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Profile: John Marenbon (Cambridge University, Trinity College)
  1. John Marenbon (ed.) (2013). Continuity and Innovation in Medieval and Modern Philosophy: Knowledge, Mind and Language. Oup/British Academy.
    The usual division of philosophy into 'medieval' and 'modern' may obscure very real continuities in the ideas of thinkers in the western and Islamic traditions. This book examines three areas where these continuities are particularly clear: knowledge, the mind, and language.
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  2. John Marenbon (2013). Divine Prescience and Contingency in Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1:9-21.
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  3. John Marenbon (2013). What Should You Know About Medieval Philosophy? Philosophers' Magazine 60 (-1):38 - 43.
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  4. John Marenbon (2012). Boece, Porphyre et les variétés de l'abstractionnisme. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (1):9-20.
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  5. John Marenbon (ed.) (2012). Oxford Handbook of Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This Handbook shows the links between medieval and contemporary philosophy.
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  6. John Marenbon (ed.) (2012). Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford.
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  7. Margaret Cameron & John Marenbon (eds.) (2011). Methods and Methodologies: Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500. Brill.
    This book examines the medieval tradition of Aristotelian logic from two perspectives.
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  8. John Marenbon (2011). Aesthetics. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 26--32.
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  9. John Marenbon (2011). Aristotelianism in the Greek, Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Hebrew Traditions. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 99--105.
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  10. John Marenbon (2011). Garlandus the Computist. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 381--382.
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  11. John Marenbon (2011). Sabina Flanagan, Doubt in an Age of Faith: Uncertainty in the Long Twelfth Century.(Disputatio, 17.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2008. Pp. Xiii, 212.€ 60. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):188-189.
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  12. John Marenbon (ed.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook to Medieval Philosophy. Oxford Up.
    This Handbook is intended to show the links between the philosophy written in the Middle Ages and that being done today.
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  13. Margaret Cameron & John Marenbon (2010). Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500: On Interpretation and Prior Analytics in Two Traditions Introduction. Vivarium 48 (1-2):1-6.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  14. John Magee & John Marenbon (2009). Appendix: Boethius's Works. In John Marenbon (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Cambridge University Press. 303.
     
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  15. John Marenbon (2009). Introduction: Reading Boethius Whole. In , The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  16. John Marenbon (2009). Medieval Metaphysics II : Things, Non-Things, God, and Time. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
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  17. John Marenbon (2009). Philosophy in the Early Latin Middle Ages (C. 700 - C. 1100). Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 76 (2):365-393.
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  18. John Marenbon (ed.) (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Cambridge University Press.
    Boethius (c.480-c.525/6), though a Christian, worked in the tradition of the Neoplatonic schools, with their strong interest in Aristotelian logic and Platonic metaphysics. He is best known for his Consolation of Philosophy, which he wrote in prison awaiting execution. His works also include a long series of logical translations, commentaries and monographs and some short but densely-argued theological treatises, all of which were enormously influential on medieval thought. But Boethius was more than a writer who passed on important ancient ideas (...)
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  19. John Marenbon (2009). The Medievals. In Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oup Oxford.
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  20. John Marenbon, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21. John Marenbon (2007). Abelard's Changing Thoughts on Sameness and Difference in Logic and Theology. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):229-250.
    The discussion of sameness and difference in the three versions of the Theologia has been analyzed by a number of recent writers (for example, Ian Wilks, JeffBrower, and Peter King). Despite some disagreements, they concur that Abelard’s views are best expressed in the Theologia christiana and that he is putting forward a theory that—perhaps adapted—can help philosophers now in considering the material constitution of objects. By contrast, I argue that his views, which should be seen as developing and reaching their (...)
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  22. John Marenbon (2007). Review of Eileen Sweeney, Logic, Theology, and Poetry in Boethius, Abelard, and Alan of Lille: Words in the Absence of Things. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (1).
  23. John Marenbon (2007). Simo Knuuttila, Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. Pp. X, 341; Diagrams. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (1):203-204.
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  24. John Marenbon (ed.) (2007). The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). [REVIEW] Brill.
    The specialized essays in this collection study whether non-Aristotelian traditions of ancient logic had a role for medieval logicians. Special attention is given to Stoic logic and semantics, and to Neoplatonism.
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  25. John Marenbon (2006). Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    Introduction to Medieval Philosophy combines and updates the scholarship of the two highly successful volumes Early Medieval Philosophy (1983) and Late Medieval Philosoph y (1986) in a single, reliable, and comprehensive text on the history of medieval philosophy. John Marenbon discusses the main philosophers and ideas within the social and intellectual contexts of the time, and the most important concepts in medieval philosophy. Straightforward in arrangement, wide in scope, and clear in style, this is the ideal starting point for students (...)
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  26. John Marenbon (2006). The Rediscovery of Peter Abelard's Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):331-351.
    : My article surveys philosophical discussions of Abelard over the last twenty years. Although Abelard has been a well-known figure for centuries, his most important logical works were published only in the twentieth century and, so I argue, the rediscovery of him as an important philosopher is recent and continuing. I concentrate especially on work that shows Abelard as the re-discoverer of propositional logic (Chris Martin); as a subtle explorer of problems about modality (Simo Knuuttila, Herbert Weidemann) and semantics (Klaus (...)
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  27. John Marenbon (2005). Aquinas. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):495-496.
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  28. John Marenbon (2005). Le Temps, l'Éternité Et la Prescience de Boèce à Thomas D'Aquin. Libr. Philosophique J. Vrin.
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  29. John Marenbon (2004). Boethius and the Problem of Paganism. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):329-348.
    “Problem of paganism” is my name for the set of questions raised for medieval thinkers and writers, and discussed by some of them (Abelard, Dante, and Langland are eminent examples), by the fact that many people—especially philosophers—from antiquity were, they believed, monotheists, wise and virtuous and yet pagans. In this paper, I argue that Boethius, though a Christian, was himself too much part of the world of classical antiquity to pose the problem of paganism, but that his Consolation of Philosophy (...)
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  30. John Marenbon (2003). Boethius. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of Boethius. After a survey of Boethius's life and work, Marenbon explicates his theological method, and devotes separate chapters to his arguments about good and evil, fortune, fate and free will, and the problem of divine foreknowledge. Marenbon also traces Boethius's influence on the work of such thinkers as Aquinas and Duns Scotus.
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  31. John Marenbon (2003). Philosophy (Ca. 525). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 105.
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  32. John Marenbon (2002). Questioning …. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):179-192.
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  33. John Marenbon (2000). Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West. Ashgate/Variorum.
  34. John Marenbon (2000). Jean Jolivet, La Théologie d'Abélard. (Initiations au Moyen Age.) Paris: Cerf, 1997. Paper. Pp. 137. F 105. Speculum 75 (3):704-705.
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  35. John Marenbon (2000). Katherin A. Rogers the Anselmian Approach to God and Creation (Lewiston/Queenston/Lampeter: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1997) Studies in History of Philosophy, 44. Pp. VII + 261. Katherin A. Rogers the Neoplatonic Metaphysics and Epistemology of Anselm of Canterbury. (Lewiston/Queenston/Lampeter: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1997). Studies in History of Philosophy, 45. Pp. 268. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (4):489-504.
  36. John Marenbon (1998). C. F. J. Martin, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1996. Paper. Pp. Vii, 148. $25. Distributed by Columbia University Press, 562 W. 113th St., New York, NY 10027. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (3):868-869.
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  37. John Marenbon (ed.) (1998). Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
    Combining the latest scholarship with fresh perspectives on this complex and rapidly changing area of research, this work considers the rich traditions of medieval Arab, Jewish and Latin philosophy. Experts in the field provide comprehensive analyses of the key areas of medieval philosophy and its most influential figures, including: Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Grosseteste, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, William of Ockham, Wyclif, Suarez, and the enormous and enduring influence of Boethius on the medieval Latin (...)
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  38. John Marenbon (ed.) (1998). Routledge History of Philosophy Volume Iii: Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
    The philosophy discussed in this volume constitutes the intellectual and philosophical ideas of the medieval era, from Aquinas and Anselm, the intellectual philosophy of the Judaic and Arabic traditions, the Twelfth Century Renaissance and the philosophical ideas associated with the emergence of the universities. This volume provides a broad and scholarly introduction to the major authors and issues involved in the philosophical discourse of the medieval era, as well as some original interpretations of the philosophical writings addressed. It includes a (...)
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  39. John Marenbon (1997). The Philosophy of Peter Abelard. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a major reassessment of the philosophy of Peter Abelard (1079-1142) which argues that he was not, as usually presented, a predominantly critical thinker but a constructive one. By way of evidence the author offers new analyses of frequently discussed topics in Abelard's philosophy, and examines other areas such as the nature of substances and accidents, cognition, the definition of 'good' and 'evil', virtues and merit, and practical ethics in detail for the first time. The book also includes (...)
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  40. John Marenbon (1995). BB Price, Medieval Thought: An Introduction. Oxford and Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell, 1992. Pp. Ix, 261. $49.95 (Cloth); $21.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):193-195.
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  41. John Marenbon (1992). Abelard, Ens and Unity. Topoi 11 (2):149-158.
    Although Abelard arrived at a view ofens nearer to Aristotle''s than his sources would suggest, unlike thirteenth-century thinkers he did not work out a view of transcendentals in terms ofens, its attributes and their convertibility. He did, however, regard unity (though not goodness or truth) as an attribute of every thing. At first, Abelard suggested that unity, being inseparable, could not be an accident according to Porphyry''s definition (that which can come and leave a subject without the subject being corrupted): (...)
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  42. John Marenbon (1992). Abelard's Ethical Theory: Two Definitions From the Collationes. In Édouard Jeauneau & Haijo Jan Westra (eds.), From Athens to Chartres: Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought: Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau. E.J. Brill. 301--314.
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  43. John Marenbon (1992). Vocalism, Nominalism and the Commentaries on the Categories From the Earlier Twelfth Century. Vivarium 30 (1):51-61.
  44. John Marenbon (1991). Later Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
    First published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  45. John Marenbon (1988). Disowning Knowledge: In Six Plays of Shakespeare By Stanley Cavell Cambridge University Press, 1987, X + 226 Pp, £25.00, £8.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy 63 (246):546-.
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  46. John Marenbon (1988). Early Medieval Philosophy (480-1150): An Introduction. Routledge.
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  47. John Marenbon (1988). Early Medieval Philosophy 480-1150: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Compact but singularly well thought out material of a theological, logical, poetic as well as philosophical nature.
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  48. John Marenbon (1987). Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350): An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350) provides an introduction to philosophy in the Latin West between 1150 and 1350. Part I describes the medieval thinker's intellectual and historical context, by examining the structure of courses in the medieval universities, the methods of teaching, the forms of written work, and the translation and availability of ancient Greek, Arab, and Jewish philosophical texts. Part II examines the nature of intellectual knowledge by explaining the arguments given by Aristotle, his antique commentators, and the Arab philosophers, (...)
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  49. John Marenbon (1986). Peter Abelard. Mediaeval Studies 48:182-189.
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