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Profile: John Michael McGuire (Hanyang University)
  1. John Michael McGuire (2008). The Logical Form of Ascriptions of Intention-in-Action. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 33:31-36.
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  2. John Michael McGuire (2007). Actions, Reasons, and Intentions: Overcoming Davidson's Ontological Prejudice. Dialogue 46 (3):459-479.
    This article defends the idea that causal relations between reasons and actions are wholly irrelevant to the explanatory efficacy of reason-explanations. The analysis of reason-explanations provided in this article shows that the so-called “problem of explanatory force” is solved, not by putative causal relations between the reasons for which agents act and their actions, but rather by the intentions that agents necessarily have when they act for a reason. Additionally, the article provides a critique of the principal source of support (...)
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  3. John Michael McGuire (2007). Malapropisms and Davidson's Theories of Literal Meaning. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:93-97.
    In this paper I show that two conflicting theories of literal meaning can be found in Donald Davidson's philosophy of language. In his earlier writings, Davidson espoused the common sense idea that words have literal meanings independently of particular contexts of use. In his later writings, however, Davidson insisted that the literal meaning of a word is a function of the speaker's intentions in using it, from which it follows that words do not have literal meanings independently of particular contexts. (...)
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  4. John Michael Mcguire (2004). Davidson on Meaning and Metaphor: Reply to Rahat. Philosophia 31 (3-4):543-556.
    In 1978 Donald Davidson published an article entitled “What Metaphors Mean” (WMM), in which he championed the idea that “metaphors mean what the words, in their most literal interpretation, mean, and nothing more.” In 1986 Davidson published a somewhat related article entitled “ A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs” (NDE), in which he defended a unique and controversial theory of literal meaning according to which the literal meaning of an expression is determined by the speaker’s first intention in uttering it. Both (...)
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  5. John Michael McGuire (2003). Davidson on Metaphorical Meaning: A Reply to Stainton. Dialogue 42 (02):355-.
    That the central thesis of Donald Davidson’s classic article on metaphor “What Metaphor Means” (WMM) is ambiguous between a weak and a strong interpretation is the primary claim that I sought to establish in my article “Sentence Meaning, Speaker Meaning, and Davidson’s Denial of Metaphorical Meaning.” In addition to this, I argued that the weak claim is trivially true and the strong claim is obviously false. Therefore, I concluded that when the central thesis of WMM is disambiguated, it is insignificant. (...)
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  6. John Michael McGuire (2001). Sentence Meaning, Speaker Meaning, and Davidson's Denial of Metaphorical Meaning. Dialogue 40 (03):443-.
  7. John Michael McGuire (1999). Pictorial Metaphors: A Reply to Sedivy. Metaphor and Symbol 14 (4):293-302.
    This article is concerned with the question of whether, and to what extent, the concept of metaphor properly applies to pictures (e.g., paintings or photographs). The question is approached dialectically through an examination of the views of Sonia Sedivy, who advances the following 4 claims: (a) that pictures possess propositional content, (b) that there are metaphoric pictures, (c) that metaphoric pictures do not possess metaphoric content, and (d) that there can be no theory of pictorial metaphor. Although the first of (...)
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  8. John Michael McGuire (1997). Philippe Descola and Gísli Pálsson, Eds., Nature and Society: Anthropological Perspectives Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (6):398-400.
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