Search results for 'John Poinsot' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Poinsot (2013). Tractatus de Signis: The Semiotic of John Poinsot. St. Augustines Press.score: 1740.0
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  2. John Of St Thomas & John Poinsot (2004). Intro Summa Theologiae Thomas Aquinas: John of St. Thomas. St. Augustines Press.score: 540.0
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  3. Raul Corazzon, The Rediscovery of John Poinsot (John of St. Thomas).score: 180.0
    Language and Ontology: Linguistic Relativism (Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis) vs. Universal Grammar Universal Ontology vs. Ontological Relativity Semiotics and Ontology: The Rediscovery of John Poinsot (John of St. Thomas) Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. First part: 1965-1998 Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. Second part: 1999-2010..
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  4. H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.score: 180.0
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  5. Joseph D. John (2007). Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.score: 180.0
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  6. Mauricio Beuchot & John Deely (1995). Common Sources for the Semiotic of Charles Peirce and John Poinsot. Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):539 - 566.score: 156.0
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  7. Daniel Heider (2012). John Poinsot (1589–1644) on the Universale Materialiter Sumptum. Modern Schoolman 89 (1-2):47-63.score: 156.0
    The paper deals with Poinsot’s ontology of universals presented not only in the Material Logic but also in the volume devoted to the Natural Philosophy of his Thomistic Philosophical Course. Currently, it takes into account also the often neglected Theological Course. The author states that there are two different positions as far as the issue of the ontology of universals is concerned, which prima facie lead to the doctrinal tension in Poinsot’s corpus. On one hand, in the Ars (...)
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  8. John Deely (1988). The Semiotic of John Poinsot: Yesterday and Tomorrow. Semiotica 69 (1-2):31-128.score: 156.0
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  9. John of St Thomas (1985). Tractatus De Signis: The Semiotic of John Poinsot. University of California Press.score: 156.0
  10. Desmond J. FitzGerald (1988). Tractatus de Signis. The Semiotic of John Poinsot. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (1):146-149.score: 150.0
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  11. Norman J. Wells (1994). John Poinsot on Created Eternal Truths Vs. Vasquez, Suárez and Descartes. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):425-446.score: 150.0
  12. Douglas B. Rasmussen (1994). The Significance for Cognitive Realism of the Thought of John Poinsot. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):409-424.score: 150.0
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  13. Mauricio Beuchot (1994). Intentionality in John Poinsot. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):279-296.score: 150.0
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  14. Jeffrey Coombs (1994). John Poinsot On How to Be, Know, and Love a Nonexistent Possible. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):321-335.score: 150.0
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  15. Desmond FitzGerald (1986). The Semiotic of John Poinsot. Semiotics:430-433.score: 150.0
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  16. E. Jennifer Ashworth (1988). The Historical Origins of John Poinsot's Treatise on Signs. Semiotica 69 (1/2):129-147.score: 150.0
  17. Martin Irvine (1988). John Poinsot, Tractatus de Signis: The Semiotic of John Poinsot. Interpretive Arrangement by John N. Deely, in Consultation with Ralph Austin Powell, From the 1930 Reiser Edition of the Ars Logica, Itself Comprising the First Two Parts of the Five-Part Cursus Philosophicus of 1631–1635. Bilingual Format. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1985. Pp. X, 607; Facsimile Illustrations and Fold-Out Table. $70. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (3):704-707.score: 150.0
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  18. Jd Kronen (1994). The Substantial Unity of Material Substances According to John Poinsot. The Thomist 58 (4):599-615.score: 150.0
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  19. Richard L. Lanigan (forthcoming). Why Investigate the Common Sources for The Semiotic of Charles Peirce and John Poinsot? Semiotics.score: 150.0
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  20. Hélène Leblanc (2014). Intention Et Signe Dans le Tractatus de Signis de Jean PoinsotIntention and Sign in the Tractatus de Signis of John Poinsot. Methodos 14.score: 150.0
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  21. James Bernard Murphy (1994). Language, Communication, and Representation in the Semiotic of John Poinsot. The Thomist 58 (4):569-598.score: 150.0
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  22. James Bernard Murphy (1991). Nature, Custom, and Stipulation in the Semiotic of John Poinsot. Semiotica 83 (1-2):33-68.score: 150.0
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  23. Tobin Nellhaus (2010). Paul Cobley (Ed.), Realism for the Twenty-First Century: A John Deely Reader. Scranton, Penn. Scranton University Press, 2009. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 10 (1):136-138.score: 120.0
    Reviews a collection of John Deely's articles. Deely is interested in the relationship between semiotics on the one hand, and the realism of Thomas Aquinas and John Poinsot on the other.
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  24. M. Beuchot & J. Deely (1995). Common Sources for the Semiotic of Peirce, Charles and Poinsot, John. Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):539-566.score: 120.0
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  25. Hélène Leblanc (2014). Intention et signe dans le Tractatus de signis de Jean Poinsot. Methodos 14.score: 84.0
    Parmi les différentes approches possibles de la matière historique, on observe souvent, dans la littérature, une tension entre les deux options suivantes : faire d’un auteur le précurseur d'une révolution dont notre modernité serait l'héritière directe, ou au contraire, et par réaction, se livrer à un travail de remise en contexte détaillé qui prend parfois le risque de gommer l'originalité possible de ce même auteur. Le Traité sur les signes de Jean Poinsot (appelé également Jean de Saint Thomas), dominicain (...)
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  26. John Deely (2008). How to Go Nowhere with Language: Remarks on John O'Callaghan, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):337-359.score: 66.0
    Jacques Maritain tells us that, apart from St. Thomas himself, his “principal teacher” in Thomism was John Poinsot. Poinsot, like Maritain and Thomas, expressly teaches that the basis of “Thomist realism” lies in the distinction between sentire, which makes no use of concepts, and phantasiari and intelligere, which together depend essentially on concepts. O’Callaghan makes no discussion of this point, resting his notion of realism rather on the widespread quo/quod fallacy, that is, the misinterpretation of concepts as (...)
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  27. John N. Deely (2008). Descartes & Poinsot: The Crossroad of Signs and Ideas. University of Scranton Press.score: 42.0
    Cenoscopy and ideoscopy -- The turn to ideoscopy -- Nothing is certain -- The way of ideas -- Nominalism versus realism -- The interplay of objects in thought and things in the world -- Sensation cenoscopically considered -- The semiotics of sensation -- The semiosic structure of the sensory manifold -- Semiopsis beyond perception -- Descartes and Poinsot : retrospect and prospect.
     
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  28. John N. Deely (2010). Medieval Philosophy Redefined: The Development of Cenoscopic Science, Ad 354 to 1644 (From the Birth of Augustine to the Death of Poinsot). [REVIEW] University of Scranton Press.score: 42.0
    Medieval philosophy redefined: the Latin age, c. 400-1635 -- The geography of the Latin age -- The fading light of antiquity: Neoplatonism and the tree of Porphyry, c. 3rd-5th cent. AD -- Founding fathers of the Latin Age: Augustine ([d.] 430) and Boethius ([d.] c. 525) -- The five centuries of darkness, c. 525-1025 -- Dawning of the main development : Anselm ([d.] 1109), Abaelard ([d.] 1142), Lombard ([d.] 1160) -- Enter Aristotle, c. 1150 -- Albert ([d.] 1280) and Aquinas (...)
     
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  29. John C. Cahalan (1994). If Wittgenstein Had Read Poinsot. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):297-319.score: 36.0
  30. John Deely (1995). Um Novo Começo da Filosofia: A Filosofia Moderna E o Pensamento Pós-Moderno Vistos Através Do Pensamento de João Poinsot (Joannes a Sancto Thoma Ou Frei João de S. Tomás). Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 51 (3/4):615 - 676.score: 36.0
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  31. John P. Doyle (1994). Poinsot on the Knowability of Beings of Reason. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3):337-362.score: 36.0
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  32. John N. Deely (1974). The Two Approaches to Language: Philosophical and Historical Reflections on the Point of Departure of Jean Poinsot's Semiotic. The Thomist 39 (4):856-907.score: 36.0
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  33. Raul Corazzon, Linguistic Relativism (Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis) Vs. Universal Grammar.score: 30.0
    Language and Ontology: Linguistic Relativism (Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis) vs. Universal Grammar Universal Ontology vs. Ontological Relativity Semiotics and Ontology: Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. First part: 1965-1998 Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. Second part: 1999-2010 The Rediscovery of John Poinsot (John of St. Thomas).
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  34. Raul Corazzon, Existence and Predication: The Frege-Russell 'Is' Ambiguity Thesis.score: 30.0
    Language and Ontology: Linguistic Relativism (Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis) vs. Universal Grammar Universal Ontology vs. Ontological Relativity Semiotics and Ontology: Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. First part: 1965-1998 Annotated Bibliography of John Deely. Second part: 1999-2010 The Rediscovery of John Poinsot (John of St. Thomas).
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  35. Paul Bains (2006). The Primacy of Semiosis: An Ontology of Relations. University of Toronto Press.score: 30.0
    How do things come to stand for something other than themselves? An understanding of the ontology of relations allows for a compelling account of the action of signs. The Primacy of Semiosis is concerned with the ontology of relations and semiosis, the action of signs. Drawing upon the work of Gilles Deleuze, John Deely, and John Poinsot, Paul Bains focuses on the claim that relations are 'external' to their terms, and seeks to give an ontological account of (...)
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  36. John Deely (2013). Analytic Philosophy and The Doctrine of Signs. American Journal of Semiotics 28 (3/4):325 - 363.score: 30.0
    Thomas A. Sebeok (†2001) considered Charles Peirce as “our lodestar” in the contemporary semiotic development, and what he called “the Dominican tradition” (the Thomistic works of Aquinas, Poinsot, and Maritain in particular) as ‘a vein of pure gold’ yet to be mined in the contemporary semiotic development. By contrast, many contemporary authors look to what is called “Analytic philosophy” (as if there were such a thing as “non-analytic philosophy”) for their interpretation both of Peirce and of Sebeok’s “Dominican tradition”. (...)
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  37. John Dewey & John J. McDermott (1973). The Philosophy of John Dewey. University of Chicago Press.score: 27.0
    This is an extensive anthology of the writings of John Dewey, edited by John J. McDermott.
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  38. John C. Nugent (2011). The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.score: 27.0
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
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  39. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.score: 24.0
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  40. Basil Smith (2006). John Locke, Personal Identity and Memento. In Mark T. Conard (ed.), The Philosophy of Neo-Noir. University of Kentucky Press.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I compare John Locke’s “memory theory” of personal identity and Memento (directed by Christopher Nolan). I argue that the plot of Memento is ambiguous, in that the main character (Leonard Shelby, played by Guy Pearce) seems to have two histories. As such, Memento is but a series of puzzle cases that intend to illustrate that, although our memories may not be chronologically related to one another, and may even be fused with the memories of other persons, (...)
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  41. Mohan P. Matthen (2006). On Visual Experience of Objects: Comments on John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):195-220.score: 24.0
    John Campbell argues that visual attention to objects is the means by which we can refer to objects, and that this is so because conscious visual attention enables us to retrieve information about a location. It is argued here that while Campbell is right to think that we visually attend to objects, he does not give us sufficient ground for thinking that consciousness is involved, and is wrong to assign an intermediary role to location. Campbell’s view on sortals is (...)
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  42. Matthew J. Brown (2012). John Dewey's Logic of Science. Hopos 2 (2):258-306.score: 24.0
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
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  43. Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.score: 24.0
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  44. Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy&Quot;.score: 24.0
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would (or (...)
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  45. H. G. Callaway (1994). Review of John Dewey, The Later Works, Vol. 13, (1938-1939). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (3):485-488..score: 24.0
    Vol. 13 of John Dewey, The Later Works, brings this edition of Dewey's Collected Works to the fateful years 1938-1939. It contains three main texts Experience and Education, Freedom and Culture, and Theory of Valuation, plus essays and miscellany. The editors, Jo Ann Boydston and Barabara Levine, provide twenty-five pages of Appendices, and Steven M. Cahn has written and excellent Introduction. The hardback version includes a scholarly apparatus featured in each of the volumes of the series.
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  46. Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 24.0
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
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  47. John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.score: 24.0
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  48. Douglas R. Anderson (2005). The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal: John Dewey and the Transcendent (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (3):280-283.score: 24.0
    In The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal, Victor Kestenbaum swims against the current of Dewey scholarship. He declares for and gives close articulation to the importance of transcendence in the philosophy of John Dewey. The guiding thread of the book is "the proposal that Dewey never outgrew his idealistic period. His philosophical achievement is not to be located in his naturalism but in the frontiers along which the natural and the transcendental touch" (137). Kestenbaum does not argue (...)
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  49. Dan Miller (2010). Review of Slavoj Žižek and John Milbank's, the Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? Edited by Creston Davis. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (1):165-167.score: 24.0
    The Monstrosity of Christ provides an exchange between the Slovenian theorist Slavoj Žižek and the British theologian John Milbank. Both authors argue that Christianity is the religion of ‘absolute truth,’ but provide very different accounts of this. Milbank argues that Christianity is true insofar as only the incarnation of Christ mediates the paradoxical metaphysical participation of the finite within the infinite. Žižek argues that the crucifixion of Christ constitutes the death of God, demonstrating that there is no providential or (...)
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  50. H. G. Callaway (1995). Review of Sidney Hook, John Dewey, An Intellectual Portrait. [REVIEW] Canadian Philosophical Reviews (6):403-407.score: 24.0
    Newly re-printed, Sydney Hook’s classic (1939) work on Dewey appears with an Introduction by Richard Rorty. Hook may help us see how Dewey fit into his own time. That story is important. The new printing may also help us see how Dewey fits into our time. Rorty lauds more recent treatments of Dewey’s work, especially Robert Westbrook’s intellectual biography John Dewey and American Democracy (1991), and Steven Rockefeller’s John Dewey: Religious Faith and Democratic Humanism (1991) gets honorable mention. (...)
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