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  1. John R. Bowlin (2000). Comment [on Mathewes 2000]. Journal of Religious Ethics 28:473-77.
     
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  2. John R. Bowlin (2000). Comment by John R. Bowlin. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):473-477.
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  3. John R. Bowlin (2000). Sieges, Shipwrecks, and Sensible Knaves: Justice and Utility in Butler and Hume. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):253 - 280.
    By examining the theories of justice developed by Joseph Butler and David Hume, the author discloses the conceptual limits of their moral naturalism. Butler was unable to accommodate the possibility that justice is, at least to some extent, a social convention. Hume, who more presciently tried to spell out the conventional character of justice, was unable to carry through that project within the framework of his moral naturalism. These limits have gone unnoticed, largely because Butler and Hume have been misinterpreted, (...)
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  4. John R. Bowlin (1999). Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    In this study John Bowlin argues that Aquinas's moral theology receives much of its character and content from an assumption about our common lot: the good we desire is difficult to know and to will, in particular because of contingencies of various kinds - within ourselves, in the ends and objects we pursue, and in the circumstances of choice. Since contingencies are fortune's effects, Aquinas insists that it is fortune that makes good choice difficult. Bowlin then explicates Aquinas's treatment of (...)
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  5. John R. Bowlin (1998). Psychology and Theodicy in Aquinas. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (02):129-156.
    Throughout much of this century the most prominent exegetes maintained that Aquinass causal authority and the composition of the list of later works did little to unsettle their shared conviction that Aristotles insistence that the will can move itself, at least in some fashion, apart from the influence of the intellect. 1.
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