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John R. Searle [117]John Rogers Searle [4]
  1. John R. Searle, Chomsky's Revolution in Linguistics.
    Throughout the history of the study of man there has been a fundamental opposition between those who believe that progress is to be made by a rigorous observation of man's actual behavior and those who believe that such observations are interesting only in so far as they reveal to us hidden and possibly fairly mysterious underlying laws that only partially and in distorted form reveal themselves to us in behavior. Freud, for example, is in the latter class, most of American (...)
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  2. John R. Searle, Language and Society: Reply to McGinn.
    In his review of my book, Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, (Oxford University Press, 2010) in NYRB Nov 11, 2010. Colin McGinn makes a number of criticisms. I believe that without exception these criticisms are mistaken; and most, though not all, rest on misunderstandings of my position. I do not normally respond to reviews of my work, but I make an exception in this case because The New York Review is so important both to me personally (...)
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  3. John R. Searle, What is an Institution?
    When I was an undergraduate in Oxford, we were taught economics almost as though it were a natural science. The subject matter of economics might be different from physics, but only in the way that the subject matter of chemistry or biology is different from physics. The actual results were presented to us as if they were scientific theories. So when we learned that savings equals investment, it was taught in the same tone of voice as one teaches that force (...)
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  4. John R. Searle (2014). The Structure and Functions of Language. Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 36 (1):27-40.
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  5. John R. Searle (2013). Ll. Literal Meaning “. In Maite Ezcurdia & Robert J. Stainton (eds.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Boundary in Philosophy. Broadview Press. 249.
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  6. John R. Searle (2012). Perceptual Intentionality. Organon F 19 (2):9-22.
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  7. John R. Searle (2012). The Basic Reality and the Human Reality: Introductory Chapter to the Münster's Volume. Discusiones Filosóficas 13 (21):139 - 166.
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  8. John R. Searle (2011). Wittgenstein and the Background. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):119-128.
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  9. John R. Searle (2010). 8 Consciousness and the Problem of Free Will. In Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.), Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? University Press. 121.
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  10. John R. Searle (2009). Chairman's Closing Remarks. Brain and Mind 908:405.
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  11. John R. Searle (2009). Language and Social Ontology. In Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.), Theory and Society. Cambridge University Press. 443-459.
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  12. John R. Searle (2009). Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization. Oxford University Press.
    The purpose of this book -- Intentionality -- Collective intentionality and the assignment of function -- Language as biological and social -- The general theory of institutions and institutional facts: -- Language and social reality -- Free will, rationality, and institutional facts -- Power : deontic, background, political, and other -- Human rights -- Concluding remarks : the ontological foundations of the social sciences.
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  13. John R. Searle (2008). Philosophy in a New Century: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- Philosophy in a new century -- Social ontology : some basic principles (with a new addendum by the author) -- The Turing Test : years later -- Years in the C hinese Room -- Is the brain a digital computer? -- The phenomenological illusion -- The self as a problem in philosophy and neurobiology -- Why I am not a property dualist -- Fact and value, 'is' and 'ought' and reasons for action -- The unity of the (...)
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  14. John R. Searle (2008). Reply to Bo Mou. In Bo Mou (ed.), Searle's Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill. 27--431.
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  15. John R. Searle (2008). Reply to Chung-Ying Cheng. In Bo Mou (ed.), Searle's Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill. 27--57.
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  16. John R. Searle (2007). Biological Naturalism. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
    “Biological Naturalism” is a name I have given to an approach to what is traditionally called the mind-body problem. The way I arrived at it is typical of the way I work: try to forget about the philosophical history of a problem and remind yourself of what you know for a fact. Any philosophical theory has to be consistent with the facts. Of course, something we think is a fact may turn out not to be, but we have to start (...)
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  17. John R. Searle (2007). 2 Illocutionary Acts and the Concept of Truth. In Geo Siegwart & Dirk Griemann (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge. 5--31.
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  18. John R. Searle (2007). La filosofía analítica de mi tiempo: algunos comentarios. In David P. Chico & Moisés Barroso Ramos (eds.), Pluralidad de la Filosofía Analítica. Plaza y Valdés Editores. 3--17.
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  19. John R. Searle (2007). Neuroscience, Intentionality and Free Will: Reply to Habermas. Philosophical Explorations 10 (1):69 – 76.
    I agree with much of Habermas's article ?The Language Game of Responsible Agency and the Problem of Free Will,? but concentrate on disagreements. (i) He is wrong to think the language game of neuroscience is somehow at odds with the language game of rational intentionality. I argue that they give different levels of description of the same system. He also has too narrow a conception of contemporary neurobiological research. (ii) He is mistaken in thinking there is a ?performative contradiction? in (...)
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  20. John R. Searle (2007). What is Language : Some Preliminary Remarks. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    By John R. Searle Copyright John R. Searle I. Naturalizing Language I believe that the greatest achievements in philosophy over the past hundred or one hundred and twenty five years have been in the philosophy of language. Beginning with Frege, who invented the subject, and continuing through Russell, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin and their successors, right to the present day, there is no branch of philosophy with so much high quality work as the philosophy of language. In my view, the only (...)
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  21. John R. Searle (2006). What is to Be Done? Topoi 25 (1-2):101-108.
    The overriding question in contemporary philosophy is as follows: We now have a reasonably well-established conception of the basic structure of the universe. But it is not at all easy to reconcile the basic facts we have come to know with a certain conception we have of ourselves, derived in part from our cultural inheritance but mostly from our own experience. Various aspects of this question are examined, concerning consciousness, intentionality, language, rationality, free will, society and institutions, politics, and ethics.
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  22. John R. Searle (2005). Kilka uwag o metodach w filozofii. Roczniki Filozoficzne 53 (2):19-23.
    The paper argues that a good philosophical investigation employs various methods, but there exists a constant temptation in philosophy to become obsessed by one method as opposed to another. It was once supposed to be two rival methods for practicing analytical philosophy: the ordinary language method and the formal logic method. Yet, those methods were not genuinely rival, as they were usually used to answer different questions. A method supposed to be in opposition to the analytic methods was developed by (...)
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  23. John R. Searle (2005). O niektórych słabościach tradycyjnej koncepcji racjonalności. Roczniki Filozoficzne 53 (2):5-16.
    The paper aims to show that the model of rationality dominating in our culture is based on a series of misunderstandings. According to the author this model consists of the following claims: (1) all our actions are caused by beliefs and desires; (2) rationality is a matter of following rules; (3) rationality is a separate cognitive faculty or capacity; (4) the weakness of the will can arise only in cases where there is something wrong with the psychological antecedent of the (...)
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  24. John R. Searle, Biological Naturalism.
    “Biological Naturalism” is a name I have given to an approach to what is traditionally called the mind-body problem. The way I arrived at it is typical of the way I work: try to forget about the philosophical history of a problem and remind yourself of what you know for a fact. Any philosophical theory has to be consistent with the facts. Of course, something we think is a fact may turn out not to be, but we have to start (...)
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  25. John R. Searle (2004). Comments on Noe and Thompson, Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):80-82.
  26. John R. Searle (2004). Mind: A Brief Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    "The philosophy of mind is unique among contemporary philosophical subjects," writes John Searle, "in that all of the most famous and influential theories are false." In Mind, Searle dismantles these famous and influential theories as he presents a vividly written, comprehensive introduction to the mind. Here readers will find one of the world's most eminent thinkers shedding light on the central concern of modern philosophy. Searle begins with a look at the twelve problems of philosophy of mind--which he calls "Descartes (...)
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  27. John R. Searle (2004). Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):80-82.
  28. John R. Searle (2004). Realism Reconstructed: A Reply. Philosophical Forum 35 (3):275–280.
  29. John R. Searle (2003). Philosophy in a New Century. Journal of Philosophical Research 28 (Supplement):3-22.
    The central intellectual fact of the present era is that knowledge grows. This growth of knowledge is quietly transforming philosophy, making it possible to do a new kind of philosophy. With the abandonment of the epistemic bias in the subject, such a philosophy can go far beyond anything imagined by the philosophy of a half century ago. It begins, not with skepticism, but with what we know about the real world. It begins with such facts as those stated by the (...)
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  30. John R. Searle (2003). Rationality in Action. MIT Press.
    The study of rationality and practical reason, or rationality in action, has been central to Western intellectual culture. In this invigorating book, John Searle lays out six claims of what he calls the Classical Model of rationality and shows why they are false. He then presents an alternative theory of the role of rationality in thought and action. -/- A central point of Searle's theory is that only irrational actions are directly caused by beliefs and desires—for example, the actions of (...)
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  31. John R. Searle (2002). Consciousness and Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    One of the most important and influential philosophers of the last 30 years, John Searle has been concerned throughout his career with a single overarching question: how can we have a unified and theoretically satisfactory account of ourselves and of our relations to other people and to the natural world? In other words, how can we reconcile our common-sense conception of ourselves as conscious, free, mindful, rational agents in a world that we believe comprises brute, unconscious, mindless, meaningless, mute physical (...)
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  32. John R. Searle (2002). Can Computers Think? In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oup Usa.
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  33. John R. Searle (2002). Skepticism About Rules and Intentionalilty. In Consciousness and Language. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  34. John R. Searle (2002). Twenty-One Years in the Chinese Room. In John M. Preston & Michael A. Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
     
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  35. John R. Searle (2002). Why I Am Not a Property Dualist. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):57-64.
    I have argued in a number of writings[1] that the philosophical part (though not the neurobiological part) of the traditional mind-body problem has a fairly simple and obvious solution: All of our mental phenomena are caused by lower level neuronal processes in the brain and are themselves realized in the brain as higher level, or system, features. The form of causation is.
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  36. John R. Searle (2001). Free Will as a Problem in Neurobiology. Philosophy 76 (298):491-514.
    The problem of free will arises because of the conflict between two inconsistent impulses, the experience of freedom and the conviction of determinism. Perhaps we can resolve these by examining neurobiological correlates of the experience of freedom. If free will is not to be an illusion, it must have a corresponding neurobiological reality. An explanation of this issue leads us to an account of rationality and the self, as well as how consciousness can move bodies at all. I explore two (...)
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  37. John R. Searle (2001). Modals and Illocutionary Forces-Reply to Zaefferer. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 55 (216):286-290.
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  38. John R. Searle (2001). Meaning, mind and reality. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:173-179.
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  39. John R. Searle (2001). Neither Phenomenological Description nor Rational Reconstruction: Reply to Dreyfus. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 217.
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  40. John R. Searle (2001). 13 Rationality and Action. In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 197.
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  41. John R. Searle (2001). The Failures of Computationalism. Http.
    Harnad and I agree that the Chinese Room Argument deals a knockout blow to Strong AI, but beyond that point we do not agree on much at all. So let's begin by pondering the implications of the Chinese Room. The Chinese Room shows that a system, me for example, could pass the Turing Test for understanding Chinese, for example, and could implement any program you like and still not understand a word of Chinese. Now, why? What does the genuine Chinese (...)
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  42. John R. Searle (2001). Unstable Meanings, Stable Communication-Reply to Recanati. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 55 (216):284-286.
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  43. John R. Searle, Barry Smith, Leo Zaibert & Josef Moural (2001). Rationality in Action: A Symposium. Philosophical Explorations 4 (2):66 – 94.
    John Searle's forthcoming book 'Rationality in Action' presents a sophisticated and innovative account of the rationality of action. In the book Searle argues against what he calls the classical model of rationality. In the debate that follows Barry Smith challenges some implications of Searle's account. In particular, Smith suggests that Searle's distinction between observer-relative and observer-independent facts of the world is ill suited to accommodate moral concepts. Leo Zaibert takes on Searle's notion of the gap. The gap exists between the (...)
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  44. John R. Searle (2000). Consciousness. Intellectica 31:85-110.
  45. John R. Searle (2000). Consciousness, Free Action and the Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (10):3-22.
  46. John R. Searle (2000). Limits of Phenomenology. In Mark A. Wrathall & Jeff E. Malpas (eds.), Heidegger Coping and Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
  47. John R. Searle (2000). Mental Causation, Conscious and Unconscious: A Reply to Anthonie Meijers. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (2):171-177.
  48. John R. Searle (1999). El trasfondo de la intencionalidad. Teorema 18 (1):7-18.
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  49. John R. Searle (1999). ** Racionalidade E Realismo: O Que Está Em Causa? Disputatio.
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  50. John Rogers Searle (1999). Racionalidade E Realismo: O Quem Esta En Jogo? Disputatio 7:1-25.
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