Search results for 'John Robert Gareth Williams' (try it on Scholar)

988 found
Sort by:
  1. J. Robert & G. Williams (2012). Counterfactual Triviality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):648-670.score: 2700.0
    I formulate a counterfactual version of the notorious 'Ramsey Test'. Whereas the Ramsey Test for indicative conditionals links credence in indicatives to conditional credences, the counterfactual version links credence in counterfactuals to expected conditional chance. I outline two forms: a Ramsey Identity on which the probability of the conditional should be identical to the corresponding conditional probabihty/expectation of chance; and a Ramsey Bound on which credence in the conditional should never exceed the latter.Even in the weaker, bound, form, the counterfactual (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Robert Gareth Williams (2008). Gavagai Again. Synthese 164 (2):235 - 259.score: 2130.0
    Quine (1960, Word and object. Cambridge, Mass.:MIT Press, ch. 2) claims that there are a variety of equally good schemes for translating or interpreting ordinary talk. ‘Rabbit’ might be taken to divide its reference over rabbits, over temporal slices of rabbits, or undetached parts of rabbits, without significantly affecting which sentences get classified as true and which as false. This is the basis of his famous ‘argument from below’ to the conclusion that there can be no fact of the matter (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Cohen Ga, If You’re an Egalitarian, Crocker Robert, Reason Religion, Crockett Clayton, DUPRÉ John & Human Nature (2002). CHARLES David and William Child (Eds): Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):325-330.score: 2100.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Patricia J. Williams (1998). Seeing a Cohr-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (New York: Farrar, Straus and GiroUX, 1997); Robert Gooding-Williams," Race. Multiculturalism, and Democracy,". Constellations 5:i8 - 41.score: 870.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Timothy E. O'Connor, John W. Murphy, John Riser, Thomas Nemeth & Robert C. Williams (1995). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):93-95.score: 855.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John D. Sommer, Ed Casey, Mary C. Rawlinson, Eva Kittay, Michael A. Simon, Patrick Grim, Clyde Lee Miller, Rita Nolan, Marshall Spector, Don Ihde, Peter Williams, Anthony Weston, Donn Welton, Dick Howard, David A. Dilworth, Tom Foster Digby 3d, Anthony Appiah, David Auerbach, Annette Baier, Seyla Benhabib, Akeel Bilgrami, Richard Boyd, Robert Brandon, Joshua Cohen, Arnold Davidson, Owen Flanagan, Nancy Fraser, Marcia Lind, Alexander Nehamas, Linda Nicholson, Adrian Piper, Lynne Tirrell, Lawrence Blum, Lawrence Foster, Roma Farion, Mitchel Silver, Jenifer Radden, Jack Bayne, Robert K. Shope, Jane Roland Martin, Arthur B. Millman, Beebe Nelson, Robert Rosenfeld, Janet Farrell-Smith, David E. Flesche, Daniel E. Anderson, J. R. Brown, F. Cunningham, D. Goldstick, I. Hacking, C. Normore, A. Ripstein, W. Sumner, Alison M. Jaggar, Harry Deutsch, Irving Stein, John Hund, George Englebretsen, Fred Strohm, D. L. Ouren, P. Bilimoria, F. B. D. & Nora Nevin (1993). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 66 (5):97 - 112.score: 810.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. C. Stephen Evans, Mark C. E. Peterson, Paul G. Muscari, Robert R. Williams, M. Jamie Ferreira, James C. Edwards & John Macquarrie (1990). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 28 (1):47-61.score: 810.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kurt Marko, R. C. Elwood, Fred Seddon, John D. Windhausen, Timothy E. O'Connor & Robert C. Williams (1989). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 37 (4):227-229.score: 810.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Timothy E. O'Connor, R. M. Davison, John Riser, Robert C. Williams, N. G. O. Pereira, John W. Murphy & Irving H. Anellis (1993). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 45 (3):59-67.score: 810.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John Casciotti, Cynthia Ryan, Dean Gerald Sienko & Robert C. Williams (2007). Law at the Intersection of Civilian and Military Public Health Practice. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:83-91.score: 810.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Williams & Robert Aitken (2011). The Service-Dominant Logic of Marketing and Marketing Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):439-454.score: 810.0
    Abela and Murphy (J Acad Mark Sci 36(1):39–53, 2007 ) examined Service-Dominant (S-D) logic (Vargo and Lusch, J Mark 68(1):1–17, 2004 ) from the viewpoint of Marketing Ethics and concluded that whilst S-D logic does not have explicit ethical content, the Foundational Premises (FPs) of S-D logic do have implicit ethical content. They also conclude that what may be needed to make the implicit more explicit is the addition of another FP. The aim of this article is to explore whether (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Peter Albersheim, Curtis Givan, Abraham Flexer, Lefevre, Robert S. Loomis, Charles W. Philpott, Keith R. Porter, John G. Torrey, John H. Welsh, Ralph H. Wetmore, Carroll M. Williams & Paul J. Kramer (1964). Comments From Harvard Biologists. Bioscience 14 (6):16-17.score: 810.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 810.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John E. Merryman, Sister Mary Olga Mckenna, George I. Brown, Robert O. Hahn, George Male, Donald P. Sanders, John W. Holland, John Buttrick, Erma F. Muckenhirn, Richard E. Schultz, Richard Elardo, Donald R. Warren, Alfred H. Moore, John Follman, Helen I. Snyder & Chester S. Williams (2009). Book Reviews Section 1. Educational Studies 3 (3):145-155.score: 810.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.score: 780.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John R. Williams (2010). In Defense of Human Dignity: Essays for Our Times (Loyola Topics in Political Philosophy). Edited by Robert P. Kraynak and Glenn Tinder. Heythrop Journal 51 (2):340-341.score: 630.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John R. Williams (2007). Globalization and Catholic Social Thought: Present Crisis, Future Hope. Edited by John A. Coleman and William F. Ryan. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):338–340.score: 600.0
  18. Robert R. Williams (2012). Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche. Oup Oxford.score: 510.0
    Robert R. Williams offers a bold new account of divergences and convergences in the work of Hegel and Nietzsche. He explores four themes - the philosophy of tragedy; recognition and community; critique of Kant; and the death of God - and explicates both thinkers' critiques of traditional theology and metaphysics.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. David M. Williams, Robert W. Scotland, Christopher J. Humphries & Darrell J. Siebert (1996). Confusion in Philosophy: A Comment on Williams (1992). Synthese 108 (1):127 - 136.score: 480.0
    Patricia Williams made a number of claims concerning the methods and practise of cladistic analysis and classification. Her argument rests upon the distinction of two kinds of hierarchy: a divisional hierarchy depicting evolutionary descent and the Linnean hierarchy describing taxonomic groups in a classification. Williams goes on to outline five problems with cladistics that lead her to the conclusion that systematists should eliminate cladism as a school of biological taxonomy and to replace it either with something that is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Robert Williams (2008). Chances, Counterfactuals, and Similarity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):385-420.score: 450.0
    John Hawthorne in a recent paper takes issue with Lewisian accounts of counterfactuals, when relevant laws of nature are chancy. I respond to his arguments on behalf of the Lewisian, and conclude that while some can be rebutted, the case against the original Lewisian account is strong.I develop a neo-Lewisian account of what makes for closeness of worlds. I argue that my revised version avoids Hawthorne’s challenges. I argue that this is closer to the spirit of Lewis’s first (non-chancy) (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert Williams (2008). Gavagai Again. Synthese 164 (2):235 - 259.score: 450.0
    Quine (1960, "Word and object". Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, ch. 2) claims that there are a variety of equally good schemes for translating or interpreting ordinary talk. 'Rabbit' might be taken to divide its reference over rabbits, over temporal slices of rabbits, or undetached parts of rabbits, without significantly affecting which sentences get classified as true and which as false. This is the basis of his famous 'argument from below' to the conclusion that there can be no fact of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. John Williams (manuscript). The Surprise Exam Paradox: Disentangling Two Reductios. :67-94.score: 450.0
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John N. Williams (2007). The Surprise Exam Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:67-94.score: 450.0
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. J. Robert G. Williams (2008). Chances, Counterfactuals, and Similarity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):385 - 420.score: 450.0
    John Hawthorne in a recent paper takes issue with Lewisian accounts of counterfactuals, when relevant laws of nature are chancy. I respond to his arguments on behalf of the Lewisian, and conclude that while some can be rebutted, the case against the original Lewisian account is strong. I develop a neo-Lewisian account of what makes for closeness of worlds. I argue that my revised version avoids Hawthorne's challenges. I argue that this is closer to the spirit of Lewis's first (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Andrew Reeve & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2003). Real Libertarianism Assessed: Political Theory After Van Parijs. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 450.0
    Philippe Van Parijs's Real Freedom for All is widely acclaimed for providing not only the most sophisticated defense of unconditional basic income, but also a rigorous examination of many central issues within contemporary political theory. This collection, including a response by Van Parijs, provides a comprehensive assessment of his "real libertarian" vision of radical social change. The contributors include Richard Arneson, Brian Barry, Thomas Christiano, John Cunliffe, Guido Erreygers, Hillel Steiner, Peter Vallentyne, Robert van der Veen, and Stuart (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Heather Roberts & John Williams, Chapter 5 Constitutional Law.score: 445.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales 77 (1):35-81.score: 420.0
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert R. Williams (2006). Review of Robert M. Wallace, Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (1).score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert R. Williams (2010). G. W. F. Hegel, Robert F. Brown (Ed., Tr.), Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).score: 420.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John R. Williams (2013). Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics (Transcending Boundaries in Philosophy and Theology). Edited by Forrest Clingerman and Mark H. Dixon . Pp. Xiv, 224, Farnham, Surrey, Ashgate, 2011, £50.00. Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, & Religion: A New Book of Nature. Edited by Charles Taliaferro and Jil Evans . Pp. Xii, 256, Oxford University Press, 2011, £30.00/$50.00. The Singing Heart of the World: Creation, Evolution and Faith. By John Feehan. Pp. 204, Dublin, Columba Press, 2010, €14.99/£12.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (4):706-708.score: 420.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John Williams, Eliminativism, Williams' Principle and Evans' Principle.score: 420.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Franklin Donnell, Robert D. Ramsdell & Puthenpeedikail M. John (1987). Robert T. Harris 1912-1987. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 61 (1):171 -.score: 420.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John Jamieson Carswell Smart & Bernard Williams (1973). Utilitarianism: For and Against. Cambridge University Press.score: 330.0
    Two essays on utilitarianism, written from opposite points of view, by J. J. C. Smart and Bernard Williams. In the first part of the book Professor Smart advocates a modern and sophisticated version of classical utilitarianism; he tries to formulate a consistent and persuasive elaboration of the doctrine that the rightness and wrongness of actions is determined solely by their consequences, and in particular their consequences for the sum total of human happiness. This is a revised version of Professor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (2011). Moore's Paradox, Truth and Accuracy. Acta Analytica 26 (3):243-255.score: 300.0
    G. E. Moore famously observed that to assert ‘I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I do not believe that I did’ would be ‘absurd’. Moore calls it a ‘paradox’ that this absurdity persists despite the fact that what I say about myself might be true. Krista Lawlor and John Perry have proposed an explanation of the absurdity that confines itself to semantic notions while eschewing pragmatic ones. We argue that this explanation faces four objections. We give a (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.) (2007). Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    G. E. Moore observed that to assert, 'I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I don't believe that I did' would be 'absurd'. Over half a century later, such sayings continue to perplex philosophers. In the definitive treatment of the famous paradox, Green and Williams explain its history and relevance and present new essays by leading thinkers in the area.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Williams, Indeterminate Survival.score: 300.0
    Most views of personal identity allow that sometimes, facts of personal identity can be borderline or indeterminate. Bernard Williams argued that regarding questions of one’s own survival as borderline “had no comprehensible representation” in one’s emotions and expectations. Whether this is the case, I will argue, depends crucially on what account of indeterminacy is presupposed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. John N. Williams (2009). Justifying Circumstances and Moore-Paradoxical Beliefs: A Response to Brueckner. Analysis 69 (3):490-496.score: 300.0
    In 2004, I explained the absurdity of Moore-paradoxical belief via the syllogism (Williams 2004): (1) All circumstances that justify me in believing that p are circumstances that tend to make me believe that p. (2) All circumstances that tend to make me believe that p are circumstances that justify me in believing that I believe that p. (3) All circumstances that justify me in believing that p are circumstances that justify me in believing that I believe that p. I (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. J. Robert G. Williams, Chancy Counterfactuals, Redux: Response to Dodd.score: 300.0
    Chancy counterfactuals are a headache. Dylan Dodd (2009) presents an interesting argument against a certain general strategy for accounting for them, instances of which are found in the appendices to Lewis (1979) and in Williams (2008). I will argue (i) that Dodd’s understates the counterintuitiveness of the conclusions he can reach; (ii) that the counterintuitiveness can be thought of as an instance of more general oddities arising when we treat vagueness and indeterminacy in a classical setting; and (iii) the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. J. Robert G. Williams (2012). Generalized Probabilism: Dutch Books and Accuracy Domination. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (5):811-840.score: 300.0
    Jeff Paris (2001) proves a generalized Dutch Book theorem. If a belief state is not a generalized probability (a kind of probability appropriate for generalized distributions of truth-values) then one faces ‘sure loss’ books of bets. In <span class='Hi'>Williams</span> (manuscript) I showed that Joyce’s (1998) accuracy-domination theorem applies to the same set of generalized probabilities. What is the relationship between these two results? This note shows that (when ‘accuracy’ is treated via the Brier Score) both results are easy corollaries (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas Williams, John Duns Scotus.score: 300.0
    John Duns Scotus (1265/66-1308) was one of the most important and influential philosophertheologians of the High Middle Ages. His brilliantly complex and nuanced thought, which earned him the nickname "the Subtle Doctor," left a mark on discussions of such disparate topics as the semantics of religious language, the problem of universals, divine illumination, and the nature of human freedom. This essay first lays out what is known about Scotus's life and the dating of his works. It then offers an (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. J. Robert G. Williams, Dutch Books and Accuracy Domination.score: 300.0
    Jeff Paris (2001) proves a generalized Dutch Book theorem. If a belief state is not a generalized probability (a kind of probability appropriate for generalized distributions of truth-values) then one faces ‘sure loss’ books of bets. In Williams (manuscript) I showed that Joyce’s (1998) accuracy-domination theorem applies to the same set of generalized probabilities. What is the relationship between these two results? This note shows that (when ‘accuracy’ is treated via the Brier Score) both results are easy corollaries of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John N. Williams (2014). Moore's Paradox in Belief and Desire. Acta Analytica 29 (1):1-23.score: 300.0
    Is there a Moore’s paradox in desire? I give a normative explanation of the epistemic irrationality, and hence absurdity, of Moorean belief that builds on Green and Williams’ normative account of absurdity. This explains why Moorean beliefs are normally irrational and thus absurd, while some Moorean beliefs are absurd without being irrational. Then I defend constructing a Moorean desire as the syntactic counterpart of a Moorean belief and distinguish it from a ‘Frankfurt’ conjunction of desires. Next I discuss putative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John N. Williams (2013). The Completeness of the Pragmatic Solution to Moore's Paradox in Belief: A Reply to Chan. Synthese 190 (12):2457-2476.score: 300.0
    Moore’s paradox in belief is the fact that beliefs of the form ‘ p and I do not believe that p ’ are ‘absurd’ yet possibly true. Writers on the paradox have nearly all taken the absurdity to be a form of irrationality. These include those who give what Timothy Chan calls the ‘pragmatic solution’ to the paradox. This solution turns on the fact that having the Moorean belief falsifies its content. Chan, who also takes the absurdity to be a (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Melissa Williams & Jeremy Waldron (eds.) (2008). Nomos XLVIII: Toleration and Its Limits. NYU Press.score: 300.0
    Toleration has a rich tradition in Western political philosophy. It is, after all, one of the defining topics of political philosophy—historically pivotal in the development of modern liberalism, prominent in the writings of such canonical figures as John Locke and John Stuart Mill, and central to our understanding of the idea of a society in which individuals have the right to live their own lives by their own values, left alone by the state so long as they respect (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. W. H. Williams (1986). Comment on John Yolton's 'is There a History of Philosophy? Some Difficulties and Suggestions'. Synthese 67 (1):23 - 32.score: 300.0
    In this comment on John Yolton's Is There a History of Philosophy? (Yolton, 1985) I review his account of the development during the 17th to 19th centuries of a common sense of the range of philosophical problems and of the canon of philosophical works. I suggest that his account may be read in light of Rorty's four genres of historiography (Rorty, 1984). I criticize his view of the place of the history of philosophy in philosophy as too timid, though (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Christopher John Fards Williams (1992). Being, Identity, and Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Philosophers have met with many problems in discussing the interconnected concepts being, identity, and truth, and have advanced many theories to deal with them. Williams argues that most of these problems and theories result from an inadequate appreciation of the ways in which the words "be," "same," and "true" work. By means of linguistic analysis he shows that being and truth are not properties, and identity is not a relation. He is thus able to demystify a number of metaphysical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeffrey Williams (ed.) (1995). Pc Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy. Routledge.score: 300.0
    PC Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy addresses the very issue of political correctness and the current skirmishes in the culture wars. It includes statements from many of our leading contemporary public intellectuals, including Joan Wallach Scott, Michael Be;rube;, Bruce Robbins, Henry Giroux, and Gerald Graff. The collection marks a watershed in the debate about "pc" in that it presents serious considerations and analyses of the factors, causes, and consequences of the culture wars. Carefully examining the construction of "pc," (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. John N. Williams (2013). Eliminativism, Dialetheism and Moore's Paradox. Theoria 80 (2).score: 300.0
    John Turri gives an example that he thinks refutes what he takes to be “G. E. Moore's view” that omissive assertions such as “It is raining but I do not believe that it is raining” are “inherently ‘absurd'”. This is that of Ellie, an eliminativist who makes such assertions. Turri thinks that these are perfectly reasonable and not even absurd. Nor does she seem irrational if the sincerity of her assertion requires her to believe its content. A commissive counterpart (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. A. N. Williams (2007). “To Observe Well … and Thence to Make Himself Rules”: John Locke's Principles and Practice of Child Healthcare. Medical Humanities 33 (1):22-34.score: 300.0
    It is often forgotten that the philosopher John Locke (1632–1704) was a highly regarded physician with a lifelong interest in medicine and was frequently consulted on medical matters, including the health of children. This child health aspect in Locke’s history has been largely ignored, with even modern commentaries on Locke and medicine giving it only a cursory mention. However, it is clear that, in child health, Locke’s influence is far more substantial than GF Still’s and George Jackson’s opinions, which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Melanie Williams (1999). ``Is Alec a Rapist?'' – Cultural Connotations of `Rape' and `Seduction' – A Reply to Professor John Sutherland. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):299-316.score: 300.0
    This article is a response to an essay written by an academic in English Literature, Professor John Sutherland. Through close textual analysis,Sutherland purports to resolve a well-known literary question: whether the sexual encounter outlined in the Victorian novel Tess of the d'Urbervilles should be classified as rape or seduction. The present article rejects his conclusion on the matter. An(equally) close analysis of the fictional text in question and of Sutherland's gloss, demonstrates the partiality of his critique, both in literary-critical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 988