Search results for 'John Robert Gareth Williams' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  47
    John Robert Gareth Williams (2008). Gavagai Again. Synthese 164 (2):235 - 259.
    Quine (1960, Word and object. Cambridge, Mass.:MIT Press, ch. 2) claims that there are a variety of equally good schemes for translating or interpreting ordinary talk. ‘Rabbit’ might be taken to divide its reference over rabbits, over temporal slices of rabbits, or undetached parts of rabbits, without significantly affecting which sentences get classified as true and which as false. This is the basis of his famous ‘argument from below’ to the conclusion that there can be no fact of the matter (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  4
    John N. Williams (1992). Belief-in and Belief in God: JOHN N. WILLIAMS. Religious Studies 28 (3):401-405.
    Of all the examples of ‘belief-in’, belief in God is both the most mysterious and the most challenging. Indeed whether and how an apologist can make a case for the intellectual respectability of theistic belief, depends upon the nature of this ‘belief-in’. I shall attempt to elucidate this matter by an analysis of the relation of ‘belief-in’ to ‘belief-that’ and by treating belief in God as a special case of ‘belief-in’.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    John R. Williams (2015). Just War: Authority, Tradition, and Practice. Edited by Anthony F. Lang Jr., Cian O'Driscoll, and John Williams. Pp. Viii, 328, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2013, $26.50. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (3):509-511.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Patricia J. Williams (1998). Seeing a Cohr-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (New York: Farrar, Straus and GiroUX, 1997); Robert Gooding-Williams," Race. Multiculturalism, and Democracy,". Constellations 5:i8 - 41.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  26
    H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  13
    Timothy E. O'Connor, John W. Murphy, John Riser, Thomas Nemeth & Robert C. Williams (1995). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 47 (1-2):93-95.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  3
    John Williams & Robert Aitken (2011). The Service-Dominant Logic of Marketing and Marketing Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):439-454.
    Abela and Murphy (J Acad Mark Sci 36(1):39–53, 2007 ) examined Service-Dominant (S-D) logic (Vargo and Lusch, J Mark 68(1):1–17, 2004 ) from the viewpoint of Marketing Ethics and concluded that whilst S-D logic does not have explicit ethical content, the Foundational Premises (FPs) of S-D logic do have implicit ethical content. They also conclude that what may be needed to make the implicit more explicit is the addition of another FP. The aim of this article is to explore whether (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  13
    Kurt Marko, R. C. Elwood, Fred Seddon, John D. Windhausen, Timothy E. O'Connor & Robert C. Williams (1989). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 37 (4):227-229.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  8
    Timothy E. O'Connor, R. M. Davison, John Riser, Robert C. Williams, N. G. O. Pereira, John W. Murphy & Irving H. Anellis (1993). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 45 (3):59-67.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  13
    C. Stephen Evans, Mark C. E. Peterson, Paul G. Muscari, Robert R. Williams, M. Jamie Ferreira, James C. Edwards & John Macquarrie (1990). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 28 (1):47-61.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    John E. Merryman, Sister Mary Olga Mckenna, George I. Brown, Robert O. Hahn, George Male, Donald P. Sanders, John W. Holland, John Buttrick, Erma F. Muckenhirn, Richard E. Schultz, Richard Elardo, Donald R. Warren, Alfred H. Moore, John Follman, Helen I. Snyder & Chester S. Williams (2009). Book Reviews Section 1. Educational Studies 3 (3):145-155.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  6
    John R. Williams (2010). In Defense of Human Dignity: Essays for Our Times (Loyola Topics in Political Philosophy). Edited by Robert P. Kraynak and Glenn Tinder. Heythrop Journal 51 (2):340-341.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    John Casciotti, Cynthia Ryan, Dean Gerald Sienko & Robert C. Williams (2007). Law at the Intersection of Civilian and Military Public Health Practice. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (s4):83-91.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. David Benatar, Margaret A. Boden, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, Bruce N. Waller & Bernard Williams (eds.) (2010). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. John Casciotti, Cynthia Ryan, Dean Gerald Sienko & Robert C. Williams (2007). Law at the Intersection of Civilian and Military Public Health Practice. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:83-91.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  66
    Thomas Williams (2013). The Franciscans. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press 167-183.
    It is somewhat misleading to think of the Franciscans as forming a “school” in ethics, since there was a fair bit of diversity among Franciscans. Nonetheless, one can identify certain characteristic tendencies of Franciscan moral thought, and certain “celebrity” Franciscans whose views in ethics and moral psychology are particularly noteworthy. I shall first offer an overview of the general character of Franciscan moral thought in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries and then turn to a more detailed examination of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. John C. Rees & G. L. Williams (1989). John Stuart Mill's on Liberty. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  19.  18
    David M. Williams, Robert W. Scotland, Christopher J. Humphries & Darrell J. Siebert (1996). Confusion in Philosophy: A Comment on Williams (1992). Synthese 108 (1):127 - 136.
    Patricia Williams made a number of claims concerning the methods and practise of cladistic analysis and classification. Her argument rests upon the distinction of two kinds of hierarchy: a divisional hierarchy depicting evolutionary descent and the Linnean hierarchy describing taxonomic groups in a classification. Williams goes on to outline five problems with cladistics that lead her to the conclusion that systematists should eliminate cladism as a school of biological taxonomy and to replace it either with something that is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  14
    Thomas Williams (2002). Review of John Hare, God's Call. [REVIEW] The Thomist 66:477-481.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. John N. Williams & Neil Sinhababu (2015). The Backward Clock, Truth-Tracking, and Safety. Journal of Philosophy 112 (1):46-55.
    We present Backward Clock, an original counterexample to Robert Nozick’s truth-tracking analysis of propositional knowledge, which works differently from other putative counterexamples and avoids objections to which they are vulnerable. We then argue that four ways of analysing knowledge in terms of safety, including Duncan Pritchard’s, cannot withstand Backward Clock either.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  35
    Thomas Williams, John Duns Scotus. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    John Duns Scotus (1265/66-1308) was one of the most important and influential philosophertheologians of the High Middle Ages. His brilliantly complex and nuanced thought, which earned him the nickname "the Subtle Doctor," left a mark on discussions of such disparate topics as the semantics of religious language, the problem of universals, divine illumination, and the nature of human freedom. This essay first lays out what is known about Scotus's life and the dating of his works. It then offers an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    John R. Williams (2015). Redeeming Philosophy: From Metaphysics to Aesthetics. Edited by John J. Conley, SJ. Pp. Xii, 342, Washington, DC, American Maritain Association and The Catholic University of America Press, 2014, $24.95. The Philosophical Question of Christ. By Caitlin Smith Gilson. Pp. Xxvi, 228, New York and London, Bloomsbury, 2014, $107.99/$29.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (6):1069-1071.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  11
    John R. Williams (2013). Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics (Transcending Boundaries in Philosophy and Theology). Edited by Forrest Clingerman and Mark H. Dixon . Pp. Xiv, 224, Farnham, Surrey, Ashgate, 2011, £50.00. Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, & Religion: A New Book of Nature. Edited by Charles Taliaferro and Jil Evans . Pp. Xii, 256, Oxford University Press, 2011, £30.00/$50.00. The Singing Heart of the World: Creation, Evolution and Faith. By John Feehan. Pp. 204, Dublin, Columba Press, 2010, €14.99/£12.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (4):706-708.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  7
    John N. Williams, Eliminativism, Williams' Principle and Evans' Principle.
  27.  10
    John R. Williams (2007). Globalization and Catholic Social Thought: Present Crisis, Future Hope. Edited by John A. Coleman and William F. Ryan. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):338–340.
  28.  9
    Robert R. Williams (2010). G. W. F. Hegel, Robert F. Brown (Ed., Tr.), Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  9
    Robert R. Williams (2006). Review of Robert M. Wallace, Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Franklin Donnell, Robert D. Ramsdell & Puthenpeedikail M. John (1987). Robert T. Harris 1912-1987. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 61 (1):171 -.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Huw Price, Simon Blackburn, Robert Brandom, Paul Horwich & Michael Williams (2013). Expressivism, Pragmatism and Representationalism. Cambridge University Press.
    Pragmatists have traditionally been enemies of representationalism but friends of naturalism, when naturalism is understood to pertain to human subjects, in the sense of Hume and Nietzsche. In this volume Huw Price presents his distinctive version of this traditional combination, as delivered in his René Descartes Lectures at Tilburg University in 2008. Price contrasts his view with other contemporary forms of philosophical naturalism, comparing it with other pragmatist and neo-pragmatist views such as those of Robert Brandom and Simon Blackburn. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  32.  20
    Robert R. Williams (2012). Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche. OUP Oxford.
    Robert R. Williams offers a bold new account of divergences and convergences in the work of Hegel and Nietzsche. He explores four themes - the philosophy of tragedy; recognition and community; critique of Kant; and the death of God - and explicates both thinkers' critiques of traditional theology and metaphysics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  10
    Robert R. Williams (2002). Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture and Agency (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):408-409.
    Robert R. Williams - Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture and Agency - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.3 408-409 Book Review Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture and Agency Elliot L. Jurist. Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture and Agency. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000. Pp. xii + 355. Cloth, $37.95. Challenging the contemporary consensus that one must choose either Hegel or Nietzsche, Elliot Jurist joins the "rapprochement thesis" (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Robert R. Williams (1997). Hegel's Ethics of Recognition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    In this significant contribution to Hegel scholarship, Robert Williams develops the most comprehensive account to date of Hegel's concept of recognition. Fichte introduced the concept of recognition as a presupposition of both Rousseau's social contract and Kant's ethics. Williams shows that Hegel appropriated the concept of recognition as the general pattern of his concept of ethical life, breaking with natural law theory yet incorporating the Aristotelian view that rights and virtues are possible only within a certain kind (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  35.  1
    Robert Wesson & Patricia A. Williams (eds.) (1995). Evolution and Human Values. Rodopi.
    Initiated by Robert Wesson, Evolution and Human Values is a collection of newly written essays designed to bring interdisciplinary insight to that area of thought where human evolution intersects with human values. The disciplines brought to bear on the subject are diverse - philosophy, psychiatry, behavioral science, biology, anthropology, psychology, biochemistry, and sociology. Yet, as organized by co-editor Patricia A. Williams, the volume falls coherently into three related sections. Entitled "Evolutionary Ethics," the first section brings contemporary research to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Robert R. Williams (1998). Hegel's Ethics of Recognition. University of California Press.
    In this significant contribution to Hegel scholarship, Robert Williams develops the most comprehensive account to date of Hegel's concept of recognition. Fichte introduced the concept of recognition as a presupposition of both Rousseau's social contract and Kant's ethics. Williams shows that Hegel appropriated the concept of recognition as the general pattern of his concept of ethical life, breaking with natural law theory yet incorporating the Aristotelian view that rights and virtues are possible only within a certain kind (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Robert R. Williams (ed.) (2007). Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit 1827-8. OUP Oxford.
    This edition of a recently discovered manuscript provides the first full look at Hegel's Philosophy of Subjective Spirit. The lectures of 1827 go far beyond Hegel's previously published Encyclopedia outline, and provide a new introduction to the Philosophy of Spirit. Robert Williams's translation will stimulate interest in a neglected area in Hegel scholarship, but one to which Hegel himself attached special importance and significance.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. R. John Williams (2014). The Buddha in the Machine: Art, Technology, and the Meeting of East and West. Yale University Press.
    The famous 1893 Chicago World’s Fair celebrated the dawn of corporate capitalism and a new Machine Age with an exhibit of the world’s largest engine. Yet the noise was so great, visitors ran out of the Machinery Hall to retreat to the peace and quiet of the Japanese pavilion’s Buddhist temples and lotus ponds. Thus began over a century of the West’s turn toward an Asian aesthetic as an antidote to modern technology. From the turn-of-the-century Columbian Exhibition to the latest (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  8
    J. Robert G. Williams (2008). Chances, Counterfactuals, and Similarity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):385 - 420.
    John Hawthorne in a recent paper takes issue with Lewisian accounts of counterfactuals, when relevant laws of nature are chancy. I respond to his arguments on behalf of the Lewisian, and conclude that while some can be rebutted, the case against the original Lewisian account is strong. I develop a neo-Lewisian account of what makes for closeness of worlds. I argue that my revised version avoids Hawthorne's challenges. I argue that this is closer to the spirit of Lewis's first (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  40.  93
    Robert Williams (2008). Chances, Counterfactuals, and Similarity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):385-420.
    John Hawthorne in a recent paper takes issue with Lewisian accounts of counterfactuals, when relevant laws of nature are chancy. I respond to his arguments on behalf of the Lewisian, and conclude that while some can be rebutted, the case against the original Lewisian account is strong.I develop a neo-Lewisian account of what makes for closeness of worlds. I argue that my revised version avoids Hawthorne’s challenges. I argue that this is closer to the spirit of Lewis’s first (non-chancy) (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  41.  37
    John N. Williams (2007). The Surprise Exam Paradox: Disentangling Two Reductios. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:67-94.
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  87
    Robert Williams (2008). Gavagai Again. Synthese 164 (2):235 - 259.
    Quine (1960, "Word and object". Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, ch. 2) claims that there are a variety of equally good schemes for translating or interpreting ordinary talk. 'Rabbit' might be taken to divide its reference over rabbits, over temporal slices of rabbits, or undetached parts of rabbits, without significantly affecting which sentences get classified as true and which as false. This is the basis of his famous 'argument from below' to the conclusion that there can be no fact of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  17
    John N. Williams (2007). The Surprise Exam Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:67-94.
    One tradition of solving the surprise exam paradox, started by Robert Binkley and continued by Doris Olin, Roy Sorensen and Jelle Gerbrandy, construes surpriseepistemically and relies upon the oddity of propositions akin to G. E. Moore’s paradoxical ‘p and I don’t believe that p.’ Here I argue for an analysis that evolves from Olin’s. My analysis is different from hers or indeed any of those in the tradition because it explicitly recognizes that there are two distinct reductios at work (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2004). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2008). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2004). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. John W. Houck & Oliver F. Williams (eds.) (1996). Is the Good Corporation Dead?: Social Responsibility in a Global Economy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Can corporations remain socially responsible in today's fiercely competitive global economy? For several decades after World War II, companies like IBM, which exemplified what journalist Robert J. Samuelson called the 'good corporation,' poured forth material comforts and technological ideas while guaranteeing full employment and adequate retirement. In the 1980s all of that changed, as corporations moved to 'downsize' and become lean, mean global competitors. In this collection, thirteen prominent scholars in business ethics, finance, management, and religion and six corporate (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Andrew Reeve & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2003). Real Libertarianism Assessed: Political Theory After Van Parijs. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Philippe Van Parijs's Real Freedom for All is widely acclaimed for providing not only the most sophisticated defense of unconditional basic income, but also a rigorous examination of many central issues within contemporary political theory. This collection, including a response by Van Parijs, provides a comprehensive assessment of his "real libertarian" vision of radical social change. The contributors include Richard Arneson, Brian Barry, Thomas Christiano, John Cunliffe, Guido Erreygers, Hillel Steiner, Peter Vallentyne, Robert van der Veen, and Stuart (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  9
    Aurélien Robert (2016). John of Jandun on Relations and Cambridge Changes†. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (3):490-511.
    The paradigmatic examples of what we call nowadays ‘mere Cambridge changes’ are relational properties. If someone is on the left of a table at t − 1 and on the right of this table at t, the table does not undergo a physical change, but it has nonetheless new relational properties. What kind of relation lies behind this kind of change? Should we abandon the definition of identity as a set of permanent properties through time? This concern with identity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  11
    Thomas Williams (2003). Introduction–The Life and Works of John Duns the Scot. In The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. Cambridge University Press 1--14.
    An overview of the life and works of John Duns Scotus (now largely out of date, thanks to the progress of various editions).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000