Search results for 'John S. Cikoski' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    P. L. S. (1937). Ethics and Epistemology in John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 34 (24):666-667.
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  2. E. E. Evans-Pritchard (1969). Mbiti, John S., African Religions and Philosophy [Book Review].
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  3.  4
    Timothy C. Potts & John F. Boler (1965). Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus. Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):361.
  4. Lesley A. Jacobs, Richard Vandewetering & John Stuart Mill (1999). John Stuart Mill's "the Subjection of Women" His Contemporary and Modern Critics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  5. Andy Clark (1995). I Am John's Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (2):144-8.
    I am John's[3] brain. In the flesh, I am just a rather undistinguished looking grey/white mass of cells. My surface is heavily convoluted and I am possessed of a fairly differentiated internal structure. John and I are on rather close and intimate terms; indeed, sometimes it is hard to tell us apart. But at times, John takes this intimacy a little too far. When that happens, he gets very confused about my role and functioning. He imagines that (...)
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  6. John J. Tilley (2015). John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):69-89.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition to (...)
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  7.  1
    Zorodzai Dube (2016). Discursive Investigation Into John's Internalised Spirit Identity and its Implication. Hts Theological Studies 72 (1):01-05.
    What does it mean to live in a society where everything good is located within one ethnicity, and geography? In reading the gospel of John, one gets the impression that faithful disciples, the Holy Spirit and morality are exclusively located within the Johannine community and can only permeate to the outside through the good work of the insiders - the disciples. Everything is asymmetric - morality, ideal disciples and good virtues - these originate from within John's community. Outside (...)
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  8.  9
    Ono Ekeh (2011). Newman's Account of Ambrose St. John's Death. Newman Studies Journal 8 (2):5-18.
    Both Ambrose St. John (1815–1875) and John Henry Newman (1801–1890), who were received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1845, became members of the Birmingham Oratory. Newman’s closest companion for over three decades, St. John’s death was extremely painful for Newman, not only because it was unexpected, but because of his devotion to Newman as well as his dedication to his spiritual duties. Along with presenting Newman’s narrative of the last few weeks of St. John’s life, (...)
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  9.  6
    Savas L. Tsohatzidis (2007). Introduction to 'John Searle's Philosophy of Language'. In John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press
    -/- This volume presents eleven original essays that critically examine aspects of John Searle's seminal contributions to the philosophy of language, and explore new ways in which some of their themes could be developed. After an opening essay by Searle in which he summarizes the essentials of his conception of language and what he currently takes its most distinctive implications to be, the critical essays are grouped into two interconnected parts – “From mind to meaning” and “From meaning to (...)
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  10. Martin Grabmann & John S. Zybura (1930). Introduction to the Theological Summa of St. Thomas by John S. Zybura. B. Herder Book Co.
     
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  11. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  12.  89
    Matthew J. Brown (2012). John Dewey's Logic of Science. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):258-306.
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
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  13.  36
    John C. Nugent (2011). The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
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  14.  21
    Matthew J. Brown (2015). John Dewey's Pragmatist Alternative to the Belief-Acceptance Dichotomy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 53:62-70.
    Defenders of value-free science appeal to cognitive attitudes as part of a wedge strategy, to mark a distinction between science proper and the uses of science for decision-making, policy, etc. Distinctions between attitudes like belief and acceptance have played an important role in defending the value-free ideal. In this paper, I will explore John Dewey's pragmatist philosophy of science as an alternative to the philosophical framework the wedge strategy rests on. Dewey does draw significant and useful distinctions between different (...)
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  15. John Corcoran, JUNE 2015 UPDATE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN's PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015.
    JUNE 2015 UPDATE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN’S PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015 By John Corcoran -/- This presentation includes a complete bibliography of John Corcoran’s publications relevant to his research on Aristotle’s logic. Sections I, II, III, and IV list 21 articles, 44 abstracts, 3 books, and 11 reviews. It starts with two watershed articles published in 1972: the Philosophy & Phenomenological Research article from Corcoran’s Philadelphia period that antedates his Aristotle studies and the Journal of Symbolic Logic (...)
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  16.  68
    David Ellerman (forthcoming). Listen Libertarians!: A Review of John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Issues.
    John Tomasi's new book, Free Market Fairness, has been well-received as "one of the very best philosophical treatments of libertarian thought, ever" and as a "long and friendly conversation between Friedrich Hayek and John Rawls—a conversation which, astonishingly, reaches agreement". The book does present an authoritative state-of-the-debate across the spectrum from right-libertarianism on the one side to high liberalism on the other side. My point is not to question where Tomasi comes down with his own version of "market (...)
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  17.  90
    Mohan P. Matthen (2006). On Visual Experience of Objects: Comments on John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):195-220.
    John Campbell argues that visual attention to objects is the means by which we can refer to objects, and that this is so because conscious visual attention enables us to retrieve information about a location. It is argued here that while Campbell is right to think that we visually attend to objects, he does not give us sufficient ground for thinking that consciousness is involved, and is wrong to assign an intermediary role to location. Campbell’s view on sortals is (...)
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  18.  14
    Thomas Williams (2002). Review of John Hare, God's Call. [REVIEW] The Thomist 66:477-481.
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  19.  29
    James Beach (2013). John Bishop's Leaps of Faith: Doxastic Ventures and the Logical Equivalence of Religious Faith and Agnosticism. Religious Studies 50 (1):1-17.
    In recent essays John Bishop proposes a model of religious faith. This author notices that a so-called doxastic venture model of theistic faith is self-defeating for the following reason: a venture suggests a process with an outcome; by definition a venture into Christian faith denies itself an outcome in virtue of the transcendent character of its claims – for what is claimed cannot be settled. Taking instruction from logical positivism, I stress the nonsensical character of religious claims while attacking (...)
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  20.  47
    Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
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  21.  60
    Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy".
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would take (...)
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  22.  22
    Jacqueline Broad (2006). A Woman's Influence? John Locke and Damaris Masham on Moral Accountability. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):489-510.
    Some scholars suggest that John Locke’s revisions to the chapter “Of Power” for the 1694 second edition of his Essay concerning Human Understanding may be indebted to the Cambridge Platonist, Ralph Cudworth. Their claims rest on evidence that Locke may have had access to Cudworth’s unpublished manuscript treatises on free will. In this paper, I examine an alternative suggestion – the claim that Cudworth’s daughter, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and not Cudworth himself, may have exerted an influence on Locke’s revisions. (...)
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  23.  20
    Luis Tomás Montilla Fernández & Johannes Schwarze (2013). John Rawls's Theory of Justice and Large-Scale Land Acquisitions: A Law and Economics Analysis of Institutional Background Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1223-1240.
    During the 2007–2008 global food crisis, the prices of primary foods, in particular, peaked. Subsequently, governments concerned about food security and investors keen to capitalize on profit-maximizing opportunities undertook large-scale land acquisitions (LASLA) in, predominantly, least developed countries (LDCs). Economically speaking, this market reaction is highly welcome, as it should (1) improve food security and lower prices through more efficient food production while (2) host countries benefit from development opportunities. However, our assessment of the debate on the issues indicates critical (...)
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  24. Sharon R. Ford (2007). An Analysis of Properties in John Heil’s "From an Ontological Point of View". In G. Romano & Malatesti (eds.), From an Ontological Point of View, Swif Philosophy of Mind Review, Symposium. Swif Philosophy of Mind Review
    In this paper I argue that the requirement for the qualitative is theory-dependent, determined by the fundamental assumptions built into the ontology. John Heil’s qualitative, in its role as individuator of objects and powers, is required only by a theory that posits a world of distinct objects or powers. Does Heil’s ‘deep’ view of the world, such that there is only one powerful object require the qualitative as individuator of objects and powers? The answer depends on whether it is (...)
     
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  25.  16
    Lukas M. Verburgt (2014). John Venn's Hypothetical Infinite Frequentism and Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (3):248-271.
    The goal of this paper is to provide a detailed reading of John Venn's Logic of Chance as a work of logic or, more specifically, as a specific portion of the general system of so-called ‘material’ logic developed in his Principles of Empirical or Inductive Logic and to discuss it against the background of his Boolean-inspired views on the connection between logic and mathematics. It is by means of this situating of Venn 1866 [The Logic of Chance. An Essay (...)
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  26.  17
    Helen Ruth McCabe (2014). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Persuasion. Informal Logic 34 (1):38-61.
    In his youth, John Stuart Mill followed his father’s philosophy of persuasion but, in 1830, Mill adopted a new philosophy of persuasion, trying to lead people incrementally towards the truth from their original stand-points rather than engage them antagonistically. Understanding this change helps us understand apparent contradictions in Mill’s cannon, as he disguises some of his more radical ideas in order to bring his audience to re-assess and authentically change their opinions. It also suggests a way of re-assessing the (...)
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  27.  15
    Hannah Tierney (2016). A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer’s Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):179-196.
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer defends Frankfurt cases as an (...)
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  28.  6
    Bojan Spaic (2008). John Dewey's Conception of Application of Law in its Philosophical and Social Context. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (2):221-249.
    John Dewey, one of the most important thinkers of pragmatism, elaborated a specific conception of law partially and gradually in the long course of his intellectual career. This part of his broader philosophical outlook is analyzed here through one of its most important segments - application of law - and interpreted in its historical, social and cultural background. The first part of the article concentrates on the 'objective' reasons for giving emphasis to the application of law in his legal (...)
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  29.  6
    Klaus Hentschel (2002). Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays. Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a modernperspective, (...)
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  30.  25
    Sallie B. King (2006). An Engaged Buddhist Response to John Rawls's "The Law of Peoples". Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):637 - 661.
    In "The Law of Peoples", John Rawls proposes a set of principles for international relations, his "Law of Peoples." He calls this Law a "realistic utopia," and invites consideration of this Law from the perspectives of non-Western cultures. This paper considers Rawls's Law from the perspective of Engaged Buddhism, the contemporary form of socially and politically activist Buddhism. We find that Engaged Buddhists would be largely in sympathy with Rawls's proposals. There are differences, however: Rawls builds his view from (...)
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  31.  3
    Jerome A. Popp (2015). John Dewey’s Theory of Growth and the Ontological View of Society. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (1):45-62.
    John Dewey’s famous early twentieth-century account of the relationship between education as growth and democratic societies, presented in Democracy and Education, was later rejected by him, because it failed to properly identify the role of societal structures in growth and experience. In the later Ethics, Dewey attempts to correct that omission, and adumbrates the argument required to reconstruct his theory, which is an appeal to the role of institutions in individual growth and experience. It is the contention of this (...)
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  32.  7
    Jeff Sugarman (2006). John Macmurray's Philosophy of the Personal and the Irreducibility of Psychological Persons. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):172-188.
    John Macmurray's philosophy of "the form of the personal" is examined with particular interest in his emphasis on persons as agents, his account of psychological development, his claim that our self-awareness as persons is acquired from the mutuality of personal relations, and his important contribution in placing personhood at the center of inquiries into the human condition. Subsequently, it is argued that the reality of psychologically capable personhood so construed is irreducible to physical, biological, or social categories frequently deemed (...)
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  33.  3
    Karen R. Zwier (2011). John Dalton's Puzzles: From Meteorology to Chemistry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):58-66.
    Historical research on John Dalton has been dominated by an attempt to reconstruct the origins of his so-called "chemical atomic theory". I show that Dalton's theory is difficult to define in any concise manner, and that there has been no consensus as to its unique content among his contemporaries, later chemists, and modern historians. I propose an approach which, instead of attempting to work backward from Dalton's theory, works forward, by identifying the research questions that Dalton posed to himself (...)
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  34. David Morris (2006). The Open Figure of Experience and Mind: Review Essay of John Russon's Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life. Dialogue 45:315-326.
    This review of John Russon's Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life focuses on Russon's position that experience is open (having a developmental, situated and dynamic, rather than fixed, structure) and figured (having a structure inseparable from forms of bodily function), and that mind is something learned in the process of working out experience as figured and open. These themes are drawn together in relation to recent scientific discussions (e.g., of bodily dynamics, mirror neurons, robotic systems (...)
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  35.  1
    Gregory Pappas (2008). John Dewey's Ethics: Democracy as Experience. Indiana University Press.
    John Dewey, widely known as "America's philosopher," provided important insights into education and political philosophy, but surprisingly never set down a complete moral or ethical philosophy. Gregory Fernando Pappas presents the first systematic and comprehensive treatment of Dewey's ethics. By providing a pluralistic account of moral life that is both unified and coherent, Pappas considers ethics to be key to an understanding of Dewey's other philosophical insights, especially his views on democracy. Pappas unfolds Dewey's ethical vision by looking carefully (...)
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  36.  62
    John Corcoran, A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN's PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015.
    This presentation includes a complete bibliography of John Corcoran’s publications devoted at least in part to Aristotle’s logic. Sections I–IV list 20 articles, 43 abstracts, 3 books, and 10 reviews. It starts with two watershed articles published in 1972: the Philosophy & Phenomenological Research article that antedates Corcoran’s Aristotle’s studies and the Journal of Symbolic Logic article first reporting his original results; it ends with works published in 2015. A few of the items are annotated with endnotes connecting them (...)
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  37.  41
    Zach VanderVeen (2011). John Dewey's Experimental Politics: Inquiry and Legitimacy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (2):158-181.
    Both during and after his long career, many political philosophies have been attributed to John Dewey. Perhaps most familiarly, Dewey is seen as a kind of communitarian or participatory democrat who provides a rich account of human nature requiring a moral state.2 Rob Talisse, for example, defines “Deweyan Democracy” as “a style of substantive democratic theory which emphasizes citizen participation in the shared cooperative undertaking of self-government at all levels of social association” (2003, 1). On this reading, Dewey’s account (...)
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  38.  20
    S. Prakash Sethi & Paul Steidlmeier (1993). Religions's Moral Compass and a Just Economic Order: Reflections on Pope John Paul II's Encyclicalcentesimus Annus. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (12):901 - 917.
    The purpose of Pope John Paul''s encyclicalCentesimus Annus (CA) is to propound the foundations of a just economic order and to sketch its essential characteristics. As such he essentially provides an orientation or moral compass for the political economy rather than a precise road map. This article first reviews the principal components of CA and then analyzes and evaluates its central contentions on both cultural and economic grounds.
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  39.  16
    S. T. Kirchin, A World Without Values: Essays on John Mackie's Moral Error Theory.
    What kind of properties are moral qualities, such as rightness, badness, etc? Some ethicists doubt that there are any such properties; they maintain that thinking that something is morally wrong (for example) is comparable to thinking that something is a unicorn or a ghost. These "moral error theorists" argue that the world simply does not contain the kind of properties or objects necessary to render our moral judgments true. This radical form of moral skepticism was championed by the philosopher (...) Mackie (1917-1981). This anthology is a collection of philosophical essays critically examining Mackie’s view. (shrink)
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  40.  52
    John Baldacchino (2008). 'The Power to Develop Dispositions': Revisiting John Dewey's Democratic Claims for Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):149-163.
    This article reviews John Dewey and Our Educational Prospect, A Critical Engagement with Dewey's Democracy and Education, edited and spearheaded by David T. Hansen, with contributions by Gert Biesta, Reba N. Page, Larry A. Hickman, Naoko Saito, Gary D. Fenstermacher, Herbert M. Kliebard, Sharon Fieman-Nemser and Elizabeth Minnich. This review will not only praise and evaluate the merits of this book, but will also attempt to frame this new study of Dewey within the challenges that continue to engage education (...)
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  41.  20
    Henry Prakken & John Horty (2012). An Appreciation of John Pollock's Work on the Computational Study of Argument. Argument and Computation 3 (1):1 - 19.
    John Pollock (1940?2009) was an influential American philosopher who made important contributions to various fields, including epistemology and cognitive science. In the last 25 years of his life, he also contributed to the computational study of defeasible reasoning and practical cognition in artificial intelligence. He developed one of the first formal systems for argumentation-based inference and he put many issues on the research agenda that are still relevant for the argumentation community today. This paper presents an appreciation of Pollock's (...)
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  42.  9
    Michael S. McKenna (1997). John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control. Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation restructures the free will debate. (...)
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  43.  15
    John D. Jones (2008). The Divine Names in John Sarracen's Translation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4):661-682.
    I draw on earlier research to develop contrasts between interpreting the conception of God in the Divine Names in terms of Neoplatonic, Latin Scholastic(specifically Albertinian and Thomistic), and Byzantine / Eastern Christian frameworks. Based on these contrasts, I then explore whether Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas were influenced, and possibly led astray, by John Sarracen’s translation of key terms and phrases in the Divine Names such as (Greek), (Greek)and its cognates, (Greek), (Greek), and (Greek). I conclude that Sarracen’s (...)
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  44.  15
    D. S. Jeffreys (2001). Euthanasia and John Paul II's "Silent Language of Profound Sharing of Affection:" Why Christians Should Care About Peter Singer. Christian Bioethics 7 (3):359-378.
    Peter Singer's recent appointment to Princeton University created considerable controversy, most of it focused on his proposal for active euthanasia of disabled infants. Singer articulates utilitarian ideas that often appear in public discussions of euthanasia. Drawing on Pope John Paul II's work on ethics and suffering, I argue that Singer's utilitarian theory of value is impoverished. After introducing the Pope's ethic based on the imago dei, I discuss love as self-gift. I show how this concept supports a theory of (...)
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  45.  7
    James Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy by Donald J. Morse (Review). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):250-257.
    Presumably, great men, including John Dewey, have great flaws. For decades, Dewey scholars assumed that the Hegelian cast of his early philosophy proved, prima facie, that it was merely derivative and hopelessly metaphysical in the worst possible sense of that term, as though nothing original or practically applicable to real life could possibly come from studying Hegel. I believe it is fair to say that, among Dewey scholars, the term “Hegelian” became an ossified pejorative that required little, if any, (...)
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  46.  3
    John R. Searle’S. Major Works (2010). List of Abbreviations of John R. Searle's Major Works. In Jan G. Michel, Dirk Franken & Attila Karakus (eds.), John R. Searle: Thinking About the Real World. Ontos 13--15.
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  47.  3
    John Searle’S. Conception (2010). Acting on Gaps? John Searle's Conception of Free Will. In Jan G. Michel, Dirk Franken & Attila Karakus (eds.), John R. Searle: Thinking About the Real World. Ontos 103.
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  48. Douglas John Casson (2011). Liberating Judgment: Fanatics, Skeptics, and John Locke's Politics of Probability. Princeton University Press.
    Examining the social and political upheavals that characterized the collapse of public judgment in early modern Europe, Liberating Judgment offers a unique account of the achievement of liberal democracy and self-government. The book argues that the work of John Locke instills a civic judgment that avoids the excesses of corrosive skepticism and dogmatic fanaticism, which lead to either political acquiescence or irresolvable conflict. Locke changes the way political power is assessed by replacing deteriorating vocabularies of legitimacy with a new (...)
     
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  49.  3
    John Dewey (1969). The Early Works of John Dewey, Volume 1, 1882 - 1898: Early Essays and Leibniz's New Essays, 1882-1888. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Volume 1 of “The Early Works of John Dewey, 1882–1898” is entitled “Early Essays andLeibniz’s New Essays Concerning the Human Understanding,1882–1888.” Included here are all Dewey’s earliest writings, from his first ...
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  50. Daniel Savage (2001). John Dewey's Liberalism: Individual, Community, and Self-Development. Southern Illinois University Press.
    John Dewey's classical pragmatism, Daniel M. Savage asserts, can be used to provide a self-development-based justification of liberal democracy that shows the current debate between liberal individualism and republican communitarianism to ...
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