Search results for 'John S. Ransom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John S. Ransom (1997). Forget Vitalism: Foucault and Lebensphilosophie. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (1):33-47.score: 960.0
    Recent interpretations of Michel Foucault's work have leaned heavily on a reading that can be traced back to the 'vital ist/mechanist' debate in the philosophy of science from earlier in this century. Friends (Gilles Deleuze) and enemies (Jürgen Habermas) both read Foucault as a kind of vitalist, championing repressed and unrealized life-forces against a burdensome facticity. This reading of Foucault, however, comes with a prohibitively high cost: the giving up of Foucault's most trenchant insights regarding the nature of power. In (...)
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  2. Mark D. Alicke & Michael R. Ransom (2012). It's a Miracle: Separating the Miraculous From the Mundane. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (2):243-275.score: 360.0
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  3. Michael R. Ransom & Mark D. Alicke (2012). It's a Miracle: Separating the Miraculous From the Mundane. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (2):243-275.score: 360.0
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  4. Montrece McNeill Ransom, Amelia Greiner, Chris Kochtitzky & Kristin S. Major (2011). Pursuing Health Equity: Zoning Codes and Public Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):94-97.score: 240.0
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  5. Gary M. Ciuba (2003). Ransom's God Without Thunder: Remythologizing Violence and Poeticizing the Sacred. Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 10 (1):40-60.score: 120.0
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  6. C. Post (2007). On Roger L. Ransom's and Richard Sutch's One Kind of Freedom: The Economic Consequences of Emancipation. Historical Materialism 14 (3):283.score: 120.0
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  7. Doris Schroeder (2006). A Child's Life or a “Little Bit of Torture”? State-Sanctioned Violence and Dignity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):188-201.score: 54.0
    On September 28, 2002, 11-year-old Jakob von Metzler, a banker's son, was abducted on the way to his parents' house in Frankfurt. A sum of one million Euro was demanded for his release. Three days after Jakob's disappearance, Magnus Gäfgen, a 32-year-old law student, collected the ransom from the arranged tram stop in Frankfurt during the night. While under observation by the police, he ordered a new Mercedes and booked a holiday abroad. Seventy-six hours after Jakob's disappearance, the police (...)
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  8. Howard Brody (1997). Edmund D. Pellegrino's Philosophy of Family Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).score: 54.0
    Family medicine has grown as a specialty from its early days of general practice. It was established as a Board Certified specialty in 1969. This growth and maturation can be traced in the philosophy of family medicine as articulated by Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D. Long before it was popular to do so, Pellegrino supported the development of family medicine. In this essay I examine the development of Pellegrino's philosophical thought about family practice, and contrast it to other thinkers like Ian (...)
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  9. Edward S. Forster (1935). Some Translations A. S. Way : Hesiod Translated; Pp. 68 ; Cloth, 5s.; the Homeric Hymns with Hero and Leander in English Verse ; Pp. 84; Cloth, 3s. 6d.; the Hymns of Callimachus with the Hymn of Cleanthes in English Verse; Pp. 36 ; Cloth, 2s. 6d.; Speeches in Thucydides and Funeral Orations Translated; Pp. 224; Cloth, 5s. London : Macmillan, 1934. Sir William Marris : The Iliad of Homer Translated. Pp. 566. Oxford : University Press, 1934. Cloth, 6s. S. O. Andrew : Hector's Ransoming, a Translation of Iliad XXIV. Pp. 34. Oxford: Blackwell. Paper, 2s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (04):129-130.score: 48.7
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  10. John W. Seaman (1988). Thomas Paine: Ransom, Civil Peace, and the Natural Right to Welfare. Political Theory 16 (1):120-142.score: 36.0
  11. J. Robert & S. Whittle (1986). The Developmental Programme - Concept or Muddle?Programmes for Development, Genes, Chromosomes and Computer Models in Developmental Biology. Edited by Alma Swan, HERBERT Macgregor and Robert Ransom.J. Embryol. Exp. Morph. Volume 83 Supplement. The Company of Biologists Ltd, Cambridge, 1984. Pp. 369. �12.00, $23.00. [REVIEW] Bioessays 5 (2):91-92.score: 36.0
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  12. Bob Brecher, Interrogation, Intelligence and Ill-Treatment: Lessons From Northern Ireland, 1971-72.score: 24.0
    In 2008, Samantha Newbery, then a PhD student, discovered a hitherto confidential document: ‘Confidential: UK Eyes Only. Annex A: Intelligence gained from interrogations in Northern Ireland’ (DEFE 13/958, The National Archives (TNA)). It details the British Army’s notorious interrogations of IRA suspects that led to the eventual banning of the ‘five techniques’ that violated the UK’s international treaty obligation prohibiting the use of torture and ‘inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’. Having decided that the document – Intelligence gained from should (...)
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  13. D. S. Hutchinson & Monte Ransome Johnson, The Antidosis of Isocrates and Aristotle's Protrepticus.score: 20.0
    Isocrates' Antidosis ("Defense against the Exchange") and Aristotle's Protrepticus ("Exhortation to Philosophy") were recovered from oblivion in the late nineteenth century. In this article we demonstrate that the two texts happen to be directly related. Aristotle's Protrepticus was a response, on behalf of the Academy, to Isocrates' criticism of the Academy and its theoretical preoccupations. -/- Contents: I. Introduction: Protrepticus, text and context II. Authentication of the Protrepticus of Aristotle III. Isocrates and philosophy in Athens in the 4th century IV. (...)
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  14. Monte Ransome Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson (2005). Authenticating Aristotle's Protrepticus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:193-294.score: 20.0
    Authenticates approximately 500 lines of Aristotle's lost work the Protrepticus (Exhortation to Philosophy) contained in the circa third century AD work by Iamblichus of Chalcis entitled Protrepticus epi philosophian. Includes a complete English translation of the authenticated material.
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  15. Monte Ransome Johnson (2012). The Medical Background of Aristotle's Theory of Nature and Spontaneity. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 27:105-152.score: 14.0
    Abstract: An appreciation of the "more philosophical" aspects of ancient medical writings casts considerable light on Aristotle's concept of nature, and how he understands nature to differ from art, on the one hand, and spontaneity or luck, on the other. The account of nature, and its comparison with art and spontaneity in Physics II is developed with continual reference to the medical art. The notion of spontaneous remission of disease (without the aid of the medical art) was a controversial subject (...)
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  16. Monte Ransome Johnson (2000). Ousia: A Fundamental Term in Plato's Ontology. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):95-101.score: 12.0
    I argue against Deborah Nails that Plato, like Aristotle, frequently used the term "ousia" to indicate what is ontologically fundamental, and that he did so throughout all periods of his writing.
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  17. Monte Ransome Johnson (2012). Colloquium 4: The Medical Background of Aristotle's Theory of Nature and Spontaneity. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):105-152.score: 12.0
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  18. John C. Shideler (1988). James William Brodman, Ransoming Captives in Crusader Spain: The Order of Merced on the Christian-Islamic Frontier.(The Middle Ages.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986. Pp. Xi, 196; Frontispiece, Map. $21.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (1):128-130.score: 12.0
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  19. Thomas Sherman S. J. (2007). Aristotle on Teleology—Monte Ransome Johnson. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):369-371.score: 12.0
  20. S. J. Thomas Sherman (2007). Aristotle on Teleology—Monte Ransome Johnson. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3).score: 12.0
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  21. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and genetics. Johnson's book (...)
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  22. Monte Ransome Johnson (2009). Spontaneity, Democritean Causality and Freedom. Elenchos 30 (1):5-52.score: 4.0
    Critics have alleged that Democritus’ ethical prescriptions (“gnomai”) are incompatible with his physics, since his atomism seems committed to necessity or chance (or an awkward combination of both) as a universal cause of everything, leaving no room for personal responsibility. I argue that Democritus’ critics, both ancient and contemporary, have misunderstood a fundamental concept of his causality: a cause called “spontaneity”, which Democritus evidently considered a necessary (not chance) cause, compatible with human freedom, of both atomic motion and human actions. (...)
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  23. Monte Ransome Johnson (2008). Sources for the Philosophy of Archytas. Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):173-199.score: 4.0
    A review essay about Carl Huffman's recent edition of the fragments of Archytas of Tarentum, along with translations of dubious material rejected by Huffman.
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  24. Monte Ransome Johnson (2009). The Aristotelian Explanation of the Halo. Apeiron 42 (4):325-357.score: 4.0
    For an Aristotelian observer, the halo is a puzzling phenomenon since it is apparently sublunary, and yet perfectly circular. This paper studies Aristotle's explanation of the halo in Meteorology III 2-3 as an optical illusion, as opposed to a substantial thing (like a cloud), as was thought by his predecessors and even many successors. Aristotle's explanation follows the method of explanation of the Posterior Analytics for "subordinate" or "mixed" mathematical-physical sciences. The accompanying diagram described by Aristotle is one of the (...)
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  25. Monte Ransome Johnson (2003). Was Gassendi an Epicurean? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):339 - 360.score: 4.0
    Pierre Gassendi was a major factor in the revival of Epicureanism in early modern philosophy, not only through his contribution to the restoration and criticism of Epicurean texts, but also by his adaptation of Epicurean ideas in his own philosophy, which was itself influential on such important figures of early modern philosophy as Hobbes, Locke, Newton, and Boyle (to name just a few). Despite his vigorous defense of certain Epicurean ideas and ancient atomism, Gassendi goes to great lengths to differentiate (...)
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  26. Monte Ransome Johnson (2001). Review of Mann, The Discovery of Things, and Wardy, Aristotle in China. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):188-198.score: 4.0
    A review and comparison of two recent and very different monographs about Aristotle's Categories: W. R. Mann "The Discovery of Things" and Robert Ward's "Aristotle in China".
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