Search results for 'John Samuel Harpham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Allen Gillespie & John Samuel Harpham (2011). Sherlock Holmes, Crime, and the Anxieties of Globalization. Critical Review 23 (4):449-474.score: 290.0
    Abstract Before the establishment in the early 1800s of France's Sûreté Nationale and England's Scotland Yard, the detection of crimes was generally regarded as supernatural work, but the rise of modern science allowed mere mortals to systematize and categorize events?and thus to solve crimes. Reducing the amount of crime, however, did not reduce the fear of crime, which actually grew in the late-nineteenth century as the result of globalization and media sensationalism. Literary detectives offered an imaginary cure for an imaginary (...)
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  2. H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.score: 120.0
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  3. Joseph D. John (2007). Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.score: 120.0
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  4. Samuel D. Gosling, Carson J. Sandy, Oliver P. John & Jeff Potter (2010). Wired but Not WEIRD: The Promise of the Internet in Reaching More Diverse Samples. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):94-95.score: 120.0
    Can the Internet reach beyond the U. S. college samples predominant in social science research? A sample of 564,502 participants completed a personality questionnaire online. We found that 19% were not from advanced economies; 20% were from non-Western societies; 35% of the Western-society sample were not from the United States; and 66% of the U. S. sample were not in the 18–22 (college) age group.
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  5. J. Bronkhorst, C. K. Chapple, L. L. Patton, Geoffrey Brian Samuel, S. R. Sarbacker & V. Wallace (2011). Contextualizing the History of Yoga in Geoffrey Samuel's The Origins of Yoga and Tantra: A Review Symposium. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 15 (3):303-357.score: 120.0
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  6. Herbert Louis Samuel Samuel (1961/1962). A Threfold Cord: Philosophy, Science, Religion; a Discussion Between Viscount Samuel and Herbert Dingle. London, G. Allen & Unwin.score: 120.0
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  7. Charles Bradford Bow (2012). Reforming Witherspoon's Legacy at Princeton: John Witherspoon, Samuel Stanhope Smith and James McCosh on Didactic Enlightenment, 1768–1888. History of European Ideas 39 (5):650-669.score: 48.0
    Summary The College of New Jersey (which later became Princeton University) provides an example of how Scottish philosophy influenced American higher education in an institutional context during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This article compares the administrations of John Witherspoon (served from 1768 to 1794), Samuel Stanhope Smith (served from 1795 to 1812) and James McCosh (served from 1868 to 1888) at Princeton and examines their use of Scottish philosophy in restructuring the curriculum and reforming its institutional (...)
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  8. Brian K. Hall (2001). John Samuel Budgett (1872–1904): In Pursuit of Polypterus. Bioscience 51 (5):399.score: 42.0
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  9. Brian K. Hall (2001). John Samuel Budgett (1872–1904): In Pursuit of Polypterus Four Arduous Expeditions Between 1898 and 1903 Finally Bore Fruit in Giving Us the First Glimpse of Polypterus Embryos, but at the Cost of the Life of Their Discoverer, John Budgett. [REVIEW] Bioscience 51 (5):399-407.score: 42.0
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  10. Henry S. Richardson (2011). Interpreting Rawls: An Essay on Audard, Freeman, and Pogge. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (3):227-251.score: 36.0
    This review essay on three recent books on John Rawls’s theory of justice, by Catherine Audard, Samuel Freeman, and Thomas Pogge, describes the great boon they offer serious students of Rawls. They form a united front in firmly and definitively rebuffing Robert Nozick’s libertarian critique, Michael Sandel’s communitarian critique, and more generally critiques of “neutralist liberalism,” as well as in affirming the basic unity of Rawls’s position. At a deeper level, however, they diverge, and in ways that, this (...)
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  11. J. B. Schneewind (2007). Review of John Rawls, Samuel Freeman (Ed.), Lectures on the History of Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (10).score: 36.0
  12. Michael Seidler (1993). Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority From Luther to Pufendorf:Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority Martin Luther, John Calvin, Harro Hopfl; The Radical Reformation Michael G. Baylor; Political Writings Francisco de Vitoria, Anthony Pagden, Jeremy Lawrance; Patriarcha and Other Writings Robert Filmer, Johann P. Sommerville; On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law Samuel Pufendorf, James Tully, Michael Silverthorne. Ethics 103 (3):551-.score: 36.0
  13. Bradley C. S. Watson (2008). Lectures on the History of Political Philosophy—John Rawls, Ed. Samuel Freeman. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):264-266.score: 36.0
  14. Bernd Warlich (1974). “State of Nature” and the “Natural History” of Bourgeois Society. The Origins of Bourgeois Social Theory as a Philosophy of History and Social Science in Samuel Pufendorf, John Locke and Adam Smith. Philosophy and History 7 (2):153-157.score: 36.0
  15. Charles Bradford Bow (2012). Reforming Witherspoon's Legacy at Princeton: John Witherspoon, Samuel Stanhope Smith and James McCosh on Didactic Enlightenment, 1768–1888. History of European Ideas:1-20.score: 36.0
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  16. Robert Browning (1987). Samuel N. C. Lieu (Ed.): The Emperor Julian: Panegyric and Polemic. Claudius Mamertinus, John Chrysostom, Ephrem the Syrian. (Translated Texts for Historians, Greek Series 1.) Pp. Vii+146. Liverpool University Press, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):303-304.score: 36.0
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  17. Maurice R. Holloway (1965). "The Christian Intellectual," Ed. Samuel Hazo, Preface by Bishop John J. Wright. The Modern Schoolman 42 (3):324-325.score: 36.0
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  18. Siep Stuurman (1989). Bright, John and Vanhouten, Samuel-Radical Liberalism and the Working-Classes in Britain and the Netherlands, 1860-1880. [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 11:593-604.score: 36.0
     
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  19. Siep Stuurman (1989). John Bright and Samuel Van Houten: Radical Liberalism and the Working Classes in Britain and The Netherlands 1860–1880. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):593-604.score: 36.0
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  20. Warner A. Wick (1949). The Pursuit of Wisdom: Reflections on Some Recent Pursuers:Man and Metaphysics. George Plimpton Adams; The City of Reason. Samuel Beer; Existence and Inquiry. Otis Lee; The Protestant Era. Paul Tillich, James Luther; La Science, La Raison, Et La Foi. S. Van Mierlo; The Philosopher's Way. Jean Wahl; Introduction to Realistic Philosophy. John Wild. [REVIEW] Ethics 59 (4):257-.score: 36.0
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  21. Richard Yeo (2010). Memory and Empirical Information: Samuel Hartlib, John Beale and Robert Boyle. In. In Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Springer. 185--210.score: 36.0
  22. Simon Cushing (1999). Rawls and "Duty-Based" Accounts of Political Obligation. APA Newsletter on Law and Philosophy 99 (1):67-71.score: 27.0
    Rawls's theory of political obligation attempts to avoid the obvious flaws of a Lockean consent model. Rawls rejects a requirement of consent for two reasons: First, the consent requirement of Locke’s theory was intended to ensure that the liberty and equality of the contractors was respected, but this end is better achieved by the principles chosen in the original position, which order the basic structure of a society into which citizens are born. Second, "basing our political ties upon a principle (...)
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  23. Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) (1997). John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity. Thoemmes Press.score: 24.0
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one fully. (...)
     
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  24. Carl Gillett (2006). Samuel Alexander's Emergentism. Synthese 153 (2):261-296.score: 21.0
    Samuel Alexander was one of the foremost philosophical figures of his day and has been argued by John Passmore to be one of ‘fathers’ of Australian philosophy as well as a novel kind of physicalist. Yet Alexander is now relatively neglected, his role in the genesis of Australian philosophy if far from widely accepted and the standard interpretation takes him to be an anti-physicalist. In this paper, I carefully examine these issues and show that Alexander has been badly, (...)
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  25. John Dewey & John J. McDermott (1973). The Philosophy of John Dewey. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    This is an extensive anthology of the writings of John Dewey, edited by John J. McDermott.
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  26. John C. Nugent (2011). The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.score: 21.0
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
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  27. Charles Bradford Bow (2010). Samuel Stanhope Smith and Common Sense Philosophy at Princeton. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):189-209.score: 21.0
    In this article, I discuss how Samuel Stanhope Smith advanced Reidian themes in his moral philosophy and examine their reception by Presbyterian revivalists Ashbel Green, Samuel Miller, and Archibald Alexander. Smith, seventh president and moral philosophy professor of the College of New Jersey (1779–1812), has received marginal scholarly attention regarding his moral philosophy and rational theology, in comparison to his predecessor John Witherspoon. As an early American philosopher who drew on the ideals of the Scottish Enlightenment including (...)
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  28. Barbara Arneil (1992). John Locke, Natural Law and Colonialism. History of Political Thought 13 (4):587-603.score: 21.0
    In John Locke's Two Treatises of Government, the state of nature, and more particularly natural man, are created within the tradition of natural law. Several commentators, such as James Tully and Karl Olivecrona, have recognized this legacy in Locke's political thought.1 While providing an analysis of Locke's thought in relation to natural law, such studies, however, have not fully examined the global context within which both the Two Treatises and seventeenth-century natural law developed. Consequently the extent to which natural (...)
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  29. Nicholas Capaldi (2004). John Stuart Mill: A Biography. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Nicholas Capaldi's biography of John Stuart Mill traces the ways in which Mill's many endeavors are related and explores the significance of his contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, the philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of education. Capaldi shows how Mill was groomed for his life by both his father James Mill and Jeremy Bentham, the two most prominent philosophical radicals of the early 19th century. Mill, however, revolted against this education and developed friendships with (...)
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  30. Antis Loizides (2012). Taking Their Cue From Plato: James and John Stuart Mill. History of European Ideas 39 (1):121-140.score: 21.0
    Summary John Stuart Mill's classic tale of disillusionment from a ?narrow creed?, an overt as much as a covert theme of his Autobiography (London, 1873), has for many years served as a guide to the search for the causes and sources of his ?enlargement-of-the-utilitarian-creed? project. As a result, in analyses of Mill's mature views, Samuel Taylor Coleridge?and friends?commonly take centre stage in terms of influence, whereas John's father?James Mill?is reduced either to a supernumerary or a villain in (...)
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  31. Noel Malcolm & Jacqueline Stedall (2004). John Pell (1611-1685) and His Correspondence with Sir Charles Cavendish: The Mental World of an Early Modern Mathematician. [REVIEW] OUP Oxford.score: 21.0
    The mathematician John Pell was a member of that golden generation of scientists Boyle, Wren, Hooke, and others which came together in the early Royal Society. Although he left a huge body of manuscript materials, he has remained an extraordinarily neglected figure, whose papers have never been properly explored. This book, the first ever full-length study of Pell, presents an in-depth account of his life and mathematical thinking, based on a detailed study of his manuscripts. It not only restores (...)
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  32. J. R. Milton & Philip Milton (eds.) (2010). John Locke: An Essay Concerning Toleration: And Other Writings on Law and Politics, 1667-1683. OUP Oxford.score: 21.0
    J. R. and Philip Milton present the first critical edition of John Locke's Essay concerning Toleration and a number of other writings on law and politics composed between 1667 and 1683. Although Locke never published any of these works himself they are of very great interest for students of his intellectual development because they are markedly different from the early works he wrote while at Oxford and show him working out ideas that were to appear in his mature political (...)
     
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  33. Basil Smith (2006). John Locke, Personal Identity and Memento. In Mark T. Conard (ed.), The Philosophy of Neo-Noir. University of Kentucky Press.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I compare John Locke’s “memory theory” of personal identity and Memento (directed by Christopher Nolan). I argue that the plot of Memento is ambiguous, in that the main character (Leonard Shelby, played by Guy Pearce) seems to have two histories. As such, Memento is but a series of puzzle cases that intend to illustrate that, although our memories may not be chronologically related to one another, and may even be fused with the memories of other persons, (...)
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  34. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales 77 (1):35-81.score: 18.0
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  35. Mohan P. Matthen (2006). On Visual Experience of Objects: Comments on John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):195-220.score: 18.0
    John Campbell argues that visual attention to objects is the means by which we can refer to objects, and that this is so because conscious visual attention enables us to retrieve information about a location. It is argued here that while Campbell is right to think that we visually attend to objects, he does not give us sufficient ground for thinking that consciousness is involved, and is wrong to assign an intermediary role to location. Campbell’s view on sortals is (...)
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  36. Matthew J. Brown (2012). John Dewey's Logic of Science. Hopos 2 (2):258-306.score: 18.0
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
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  37. Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy&Quot;.score: 18.0
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would (or (...)
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  38. H. G. Callaway (1994). Review of John Dewey, The Later Works, Vol. 13, (1938-1939). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (3):485-488..score: 18.0
    Vol. 13 of John Dewey, The Later Works, brings this edition of Dewey's Collected Works to the fateful years 1938-1939. It contains three main texts Experience and Education, Freedom and Culture, and Theory of Valuation, plus essays and miscellany. The editors, Jo Ann Boydston and Barabara Levine, provide twenty-five pages of Appendices, and Steven M. Cahn has written and excellent Introduction. The hardback version includes a scholarly apparatus featured in each of the volumes of the series.
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  39. Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.score: 18.0
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  40. Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 18.0
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
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  41. Alejandra Mancilla (2012). Samuel Pufendorf and the Right of Necessity. Aporia 3:47-64.score: 18.0
    From the end of the twelfth century until the middle of the eighteenth century, the concept of a right of necessity –i.e. the moral prerogative of an agent, given certain conditions, to use or take someone else’s property in order to get out of his plight– was common among moral and political philosophers, who took it to be a valid exception to the standard moral and legal rules. In this essay, I analyze Samuel Pufendorf’s account of such a right, (...)
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  42. H. G. Callaway (1995). Review of Sidney Hook, John Dewey, An Intellectual Portrait. [REVIEW] Canadian Philosophical Reviews (6):403-407.score: 18.0
    Newly re-printed, Sydney Hook’s classic (1939) work on Dewey appears with an Introduction by Richard Rorty. Hook may help us see how Dewey fit into his own time. That story is important. The new printing may also help us see how Dewey fits into our time. Rorty lauds more recent treatments of Dewey’s work, especially Robert Westbrook’s intellectual biography John Dewey and American Democracy (1991), and Steven Rockefeller’s John Dewey: Religious Faith and Democratic Humanism (1991) gets honorable mention. (...)
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  43. Dan Miller (2010). Review of Slavoj Žižek and John Milbank's, the Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? Edited by Creston Davis. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (1):165-167.score: 18.0
    The Monstrosity of Christ provides an exchange between the Slovenian theorist Slavoj Žižek and the British theologian John Milbank. Both authors argue that Christianity is the religion of ‘absolute truth,’ but provide very different accounts of this. Milbank argues that Christianity is true insofar as only the incarnation of Christ mediates the paradoxical metaphysical participation of the finite within the infinite. Žižek argues that the crucifixion of Christ constitutes the death of God, demonstrating that there is no providential or (...)
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  44. John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.score: 18.0
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  45. Peter Gan Chong Beng (2009). Union and Difference: A Dialectical Structuring of St. John of the Cross' Mysticism. Sophia 48 (1):43-57.score: 18.0
    This paper intends to append the frame of dialectic upon St. John of the Cross’ delineation of mysticism. Its underlying hypothesis is that the dialectical structuring of St. John’s mystical theology promises to unravel the web of relational concepts embedded within his immense writings on this unique phenomenon. It is hoped that as a consequence of this undertaking, relevant pairs of correlative opposites that figure prominently in mysticism can be elucidated and perhaps come to some form of resolution.
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  46. Alex Voorhoeve (2004). John Rawls. In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), The Great Thinkers A-Z. Continuum.score: 18.0
    The political and philosophical problems John Rawls set out to solve arise out of the identity and conflicts of interests between citizens. There is identity of interests because social cooperation makes possible for everyone a life that is much better than one outside of society. There is a conflict of interests because people all prefer a larger to a smaller share of the benefits of social cooperation, and people have ideological differences. The problem a theory of justice has to (...)
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  47. Jan-Erik Jones (2012). Review of John Locke and Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2012.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Peter Anstey's John Locke and Natural Philosophy, which is a masterful and well-argued study of Locke's philosophy of science that shall become both the standard and starting place, for scholars and students alike, for decades to come. Anstey's meticulous and thorough research, combined with his comprehensive knowledge of the history of natural philosophy, make this work a must-read for all who are interested in Locke, early modern philosophy, the history of the philosophy of science, (...)
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  48. Ernesto Perini-Santos (2008). John Buridan on the Bearer of Logical Relations. Logica Universalis 2 (1):59-70.score: 18.0
    . According to John Buridan, the time for which a statement is true is underdetermined by the grammatical form of the sentence – the intention of the speaker is required. As a consequence, truth-bearers are not sentence types, nor sentence tokens plus facts of the context of utterance, but statements. Statements are also the bearers of logical relations, since the latter can only be established among entities having determined truth-conditions. This role of the intention of the speaker in the (...)
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  49. Alan Ryan (1995). John Dewey and the High Tide of American Liberalism. W.W. Norton.score: 18.0
    "When John Dewey died in 1952, he was memorialized as America's most famous philosopher, revered by liberal educators and deplored by conservatives, but universally acknowledged as his country's intellectual voice. Many things conspired to give Dewey an extraordinary intellectual eminence: He was immensely long-lived and immensely prolific; he died in his ninety-third year, and his intellectual productivity hardly slackened until his eighties." "Professor Alan Ryan offers new insights into Dewey's many achievements, his character, and the era in which his (...)
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  50. Stephen H. Daniel (2011). Berkeley's Rejection of Divine Analogy. Science Et Esprit 63 (2):149-161.score: 18.0
    Berkeley argues that claims about divine predication (e.g., God is wise or exists) should be understood literally rather than analogically, because like all spirits (i.e., causes), God is intelligible only in terms of the extent of his effects. By focusing on the harmony and order of nature, Berkeley thus unites his view of God with his doctrines of mind, force, grace, and power, and avoids challenges to religious claims that are raised by appeals to analogy. The essay concludes by showing (...)
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