Search results for 'John Skilling' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    John Skilling (1985). Prior Probabilities. Synthese 63 (1):1 - 34.
    The theoretical construction and practical use of prior probabilities, in particular for systems having many degrees of freedom, are investigated. It becomes clear that it is operationally unsound to use mutually consistent priors if one wishes to draw sensible conclusions from practical experiments. The prior cannot usefully be identified with a state of knowledge, and indeed it is not so identified in common scientific practice. Rather, it can be identified with the question one asks. Accordingly, priors are free constructions. Their (...)
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  2.  18
    Joseph D. John (2007). Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.
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  3.  17
    H. Grundmann Christoffer & R. Eckrich John (2011). Philosophy, Science and Divine Action Edited by F. LeRon Shults, Nancey Murphy, and Robert John Russell. Zygon 46 (3):764-765.
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  4.  35
    Reijo Miettinen (2006). Epistemology of Transformative Material Activity: John Dewey's Pragmatism and Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (4):389–408.
    The paper compares John Dewey's pragmatism and cultural-historical activity theory as epistemologies and theories of transformative material activity. For both of the theories, the concept of activity, the prototype of which is work, constitutes a basis for understanding the nature of knowledge and reality. This concept also implies for both theories a methodological approach of studying human behavior in which social experimentation and intervention play a central role. They also suggest that reflection and thought, mediated by language and semiotic (...)
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  5.  9
    C. A. Bowers (2003). The Case Against John Dewey as an Environmental and Eco-Justice Philosopher. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):25-42.
    Environmentally oriented philosophers and educational theorists are now attempting to clarify how the ideas of John Dewey can be used as the basis for changing cultural practices that contribute to the ecological crisis. Although Dewey can be interpreted as a nonanthropocentric thinker and his method of experimental inquiry can be used in eco-management projects, Dewey should not be regarded as an environmental and eco-justice philosopher—and by extension, his followers should not be regarded in this light. (1) Dewey’s emphasis on (...)
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  6.  48
    Austen Clark (2006). Attention & Inscrutability: A Commentary on John Campbell, Reference and Consciousness for the Pacific APA Meeting, Pasadena, California, 2004. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):167-193.
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of "Reference and Consciousness". The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
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  7.  7
    Jill Howard (2004). 'Physics and Fashion': John Tyndall and His Audiences in Mid-Victorian Britain. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (4):729-758.
    This paper explores how the physicist John Tyndall transformed himself from humble surveyor and schoolmaster into an internationally applauded icon of science. Beginning with his appointment as Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution in 1853, I show how Tyndall’s worries about his social class and Irish origins, his painstaking attention to his lecturing performance and skilled use of the material and architectural resources of the Royal Institution were vital to his eventual success as a popular expositor and (...)
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  8.  41
    John Dewey & John J. McDermott (1973). The Philosophy of John Dewey. University of Chicago Press.
    This is an extensive anthology of the writings of John Dewey, edited by John J. McDermott.
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  9.  80
    John Dunn (1969). The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government'. London, Cambridge U.P..
    This study provides a comprehensive reinterpretation of the meaning of Locke's political thought. John Dunn restores Locke's ideas to their exact context, and so stresses the historical question of what Locke in the Two Treatises of Government was intending to claim. By adopting this approach, he reveals the predominantly theological character of all Locke's thinking about politics and provides a convincing analysis of the development of Locke's thought. In a polemical concluding section, John Dunn argues that liberal and (...)
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  10.  52
    John Marshall (1994). John Locke: Resistance, Religion, and Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.
    A major account of the development of the political, religious, social and moral thought of John Locke.
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  11.  3
    John J. Tilley (2015). John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):69-89.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition to (...)
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  12.  31
    John C. Nugent (2011). The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
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  13. Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) (1997). John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity. Thoemmes Press.
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one fully. (...)
     
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  14.  0
    Steven Fesmire (2003). John Dewey and Moral Imagination: Pragmatism in Ethics. Indiana University Press.
    While examining the important role of imagination in making moral judgments, John Dewey and Moral Imagination focuses new attention on the relationship between American pragmatism and ethics. Steven Fesmire takes up threads of Dewey's thought that have been largely unexplored and elaborates pragmatism's distinctive contribution to understandings of moral experience, inquiry, and judgment. Building on two Deweyan notions—that moral character, belief, and reasoning are part of a social and historical context and that moral deliberation is an imaginative, dramatic rehearsal (...)
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  15. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  16.  10
    Marek Piechowiak (2014). Sprawiedliwość a prawo w nauczaniu Jana Pawła II [Justice and Law in the Teaching of John Paul II]. Przegląd Tomistyczny 20:209-237.
    The contribution focuses on philosophical issues of justice of positive law in the light of the social teaching of John Paul II. The analyses start with consideration of anthropological foundations of justice as virtue, develop with the reflexion upon justice of actions realizing justice and finally arrive at examination of the criteria of justice of law. -/- It is argued that relations between a human being and goods (ends of actions) form ontological basis of natural law and justice of (...)
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  17.  73
    Matthew J. Brown (2012). John Dewey's Logic of Science. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):258-306.
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
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  18.  31
    Alan Ryan (1995). John Dewey and the High Tide of American Liberalism. W.W. Norton.
    "When John Dewey died in 1952, he was memorialized as America's most famous philosopher, revered by liberal educators and deplored by conservatives, but universally acknowledged as his country's intellectual voice. Many things conspired to give Dewey an extraordinary intellectual eminence: He was immensely long-lived and immensely prolific; he died in his ninety-third year, and his intellectual productivity hardly slackened until his eighties." "Professor Alan Ryan offers new insights into Dewey's many achievements, his character, and the era in which his (...)
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  19.  5
    Raymond D. Boisvert (1998). John Dewey : Rethinking Our Time. State University of New York Press.
    ISBN 0-7914-3529-6 (hard : alk. paper). — ISBN 0-7914-3530-X (pbk. : alk. paper ) 1. Dewey, John, 1854-1952. I. Title. II. Series: SUNY series in philosophy of education. B945.D4B65 1997 191— dc 21 96-52291 CIP 10 987654321 For Jayne ...
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  20.  63
    Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  21.  27
    David Ellerman (forthcoming). Listen Libertarians!: A Review of John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW] Conversations in Philanthropy.
    John Tomasi's new book, Free Market Fairness, has been well-received as "one of the very best philosophical treatments of libertarian thought, ever" (Tyler Cowen) and as a "long and friendly conversation between Friedrich Hayek and John Rawls—a conversation which, astonishingly, reaches agreement" (D. McCloskey). The book does present an authoritative state-of-the-debate across the spectrum from right-libertarianism on the one side to high liberalism (that shares some shades of opinion with democratic socialism) on the other side. My point is (...)
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  22. Tim Thornton (2004). John Mcdowell. Routledge.
    John McDowell's contribution to philosophy has ranged across Greek philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and ethics. His writings have drawn on the works of, amongst others, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Davidson. His contributions have made him one of the most widely read, discussed and challenging philosophers writing today. This book provides a careful account of the main claims that McDowell advances in a number of different areas of philosophy. The interconnections between the (...)
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  23. N. Fotion (2000). John Searle. Princeton University Press.
    One of the world's most important philosophers of mind and language, John Searle (b. 1932) is direct, combative, and intellectually ambitious. His philosophy has made fundamental and lasting contributions to how we think about speech, consciousness, knowledge, truth, and the nature of social reality. Here, with remarkable clarity, a leading authority introduces students and generalists to those contributions. Nick Fotion explains Searle's ideas in full, while also testing and exploring their implications. He first takes up Searle's philosophy of language, (...)
     
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  24.  21
    Trevor Pearce (2014). The Dialectical Biologist, Circa 1890: John Dewey and the Oxford Hegelians. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):747-777.
    I argue in this paper that rather than viewing John Dewey as either a historicist (inspired by Hegel) or a naturalist (inspired by biology), we should see him as strange but potentially fruitful combination of both. I will demonstrate that the notion of organism-environment interaction central to Dewey’s pragmatism stems from a Hegelian approach to adaptation; his turn to biology was not necessarily a turn away from Hegel. I argue that Dewey’s account of the organism-environment relation derives from the (...)
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  25.  12
    John Skorupski (1989/1999). John Stuart Mill. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  26. Basil Smith (2006). John Locke, Personal Identity and Memento. In Mark T. Conard (ed.), The Philosophy of Neo-Noir. University of Kentucky Press
    In this paper, I compare John Locke’s “memory theory” of personal identity and Memento (directed by Christopher Nolan). I argue that the plot of Memento is ambiguous, in that the main character (Leonard Shelby, played by Guy Pearce) seems to have two histories. As such, Memento is but a series of puzzle cases that intend to illustrate that, although our memories may not be chronologically related to one another, and may even be fused with the memories of other persons, (...)
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  27.  2
    José L. Tasset (2015). Sobre las interpretaciones de John Stuart Mill. Un comentario a Frederick Rosen: Mill , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 315 pp. [REVIEW] Télos 20 (1):127-133.
    Sobre las interpretaciones de John Stuart Mill. Un comentario a Frederick Rosen: Mill, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 315 pp.
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  28.  76
    Mohan P. Matthen (2006). On Visual Experience of Objects: Comments on John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):195-220.
    John Campbell argues that visual attention to objects is the means by which we can refer to objects, and that this is so because conscious visual attention enables us to retrieve information about a location. It is argued here that while Campbell is right to think that we visually attend to objects, he does not give us sufficient ground for thinking that consciousness is involved, and is wrong to assign an intermediary role to location. Campbell’s view on sortals is (...)
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  29.  18
    Risto Saarinen (1993). John Buridan and Donald Davidson on Akrasia. Synthese 96 (1):133-154.
    This article has two objectives. Firts, it is my aim to outline some medieval views concerning the acts that oppose one's better judgment. I will use Aristotle's term aktasia to denote the moral state of an agent behaving in this way. John Burdidan's (1285-1349) treatment of akrasia is especially relevant here. Second, it will be argued that some important philosophical ideas proposed receently by Donald Davidson, in his influential study 'How is Waekness of the Will Possible?', are anticipated in (...)
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  30. John Locke (1976/2010). The Correspondence of John Locke. Clarendon Press.
     
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  31. John Dewey & Reginald Donat Archambault (1974). John Dewey on Education Selected Writings. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  32.  40
    John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  33. John Locke & John W. Yolton (1997). The Works of John Locke.
     
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  34.  26
    John Dewey, Paul Arthur Schilpp & Lewis Edwin Hahn (eds.) (1939). The Philosophy of John Dewey. Open Court.
    This is a classic volume in the "library of Living Philosophers" and includes a collection of essays on Dewey's work by his contemporaries at the time of the volume's publication. It also includes a biographical essay on Dewey and his replies to the assembled essays.
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  35.  6
    John Colman (1984). John Locke's Moral Philosophy. Philosophical Review 93 (4):615-618.
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  36.  43
    Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
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  37.  16
    Lukas M. Verburgt (2014). John Venn's Hypothetical Infinite Frequentism and Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (3):248-271.
    The goal of this paper is to provide a detailed reading of John Venn's Logic of Chance as a work of logic or, more specifically, as a specific portion of the general system of so-called ‘material’ logic developed in his Principles of Empirical or Inductive Logic and to discuss it against the background of his Boolean-inspired views on the connection between logic and mathematics. It is by means of this situating of Venn 1866 [The Logic of Chance. An Essay (...)
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  38.  8
    Karen E. Tatum (2010). Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads (...)
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  39.  9
    Eric Gregory (2007). Before the Original Position: The Neo‐Orthodox Theology of the Young John Rawls. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):179-206.
    This paper examines a remarkable document that has escaped critical attention within the vast literature on John Rawls, religion, and liberalism: Rawls's undergraduate thesis, "A Brief Inquiry into the Meaning of Sin and Faith: An Interpretation Based on the Concept of Community" (1942). The thesis shows the extent to which a once regnant version of Protestant theology has retreated into seminaries and divinity schools where it now also meets resistance. Ironically, the young Rawls rejected social contract liberalism for reasons (...)
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  40.  9
    John W. Yolton (1968). John Locke and the Way of Ideas. Oxford, Clarendon Press.
  41. Hugh P. McDonald (2003). John Dewey and Environmental Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    A comprehensive look at how John Dewey's ethics can inform environmental issues.
     
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  42. John Locke, John R. Harrison & Peter Laslett (1965). The Library of John Locke. Published for the Oxford Bibliographical Society by the Oxford University Press.
     
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  43.  18
    Luis Tomás Montilla Fernández & Johannes Schwarze (2013). John Rawls's Theory of Justice and Large-Scale Land Acquisitions: A Law and Economics Analysis of Institutional Background Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1223-1240.
    During the 2007–2008 global food crisis, the prices of primary foods, in particular, peaked. Subsequently, governments concerned about food security and investors keen to capitalize on profit-maximizing opportunities undertook large-scale land acquisitions (LASLA) in, predominantly, least developed countries (LDCs). Economically speaking, this market reaction is highly welcome, as it should (1) improve food security and lower prices through more efficient food production while (2) host countries benefit from development opportunities. However, our assessment of the debate on the issues indicates critical (...)
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  44.  22
    Peter R. Anstey & Lawrence M. Principe (2011). John Locke and the Case of Anthony Ashley Cooper. Early Science and Medicine 16 (5):379-503.
    In June 1668 Anthony Ashley Cooper, later to become the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, underwent abdominal surgery to drain a large abscess above his liver. The case is extraordinary, not simply on account of the eminence of the patient and the danger of the procedure, but also because of the many celebrated figures involved. A trove of manuscripts relating to this famous operation survives amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives at Kew. These include case notes in the hand (...)
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  45.  50
    Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy".
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would take (...)
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  46.  2
    Bojan Spaic (2008). John Dewey's Conception of Application of Law in its Philosophical and Social Context. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (2):221-249.
    John Dewey, one of the most important thinkers of pragmatism, elaborated a specific conception of law partially and gradually in the long course of his intellectual career. This part of his broader philosophical outlook is analyzed here through one of its most important segments - application of law - and interpreted in its historical, social and cultural background. The first part of the article concentrates on the 'objective' reasons for giving emphasis to the application of law in his legal (...)
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  47.  1
    Estrella Trincado Aznar (2015). Silencios que hacen ruido: De cómo se sobrepuso John Stuart Mill de los estados melancólicos del utilitarismo. Télos 20 (1):27-50.
    John Stuart Mill based initially his conception of suicide on Hume's theory and on Bentham's moral arithmetic; nevertheless, he had a transforming experience in his youth, moment in which he longed for ending his life that he overcame reading the English romanticism. This article describes Mill's vision on the suicide, which he purposely silenced, through the conception of romanticism, of Hume and also of Adam Smith. Certainly, in the Theory of Moral Sentiments Smith was bold enough to criticize Hume's (...)
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  48.  1
    Ricardo Cueva Fernández (2015). Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill y el “Poder Esclavista. Télos 20 (1):91-123.
    Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill supported Abraham Lincoln against what they called the “Slave Power”. Both thinkers fought for the abolition of slavery, and backed the Union in the American Civil War. Marx spread out his opinions on the war and the future social and political changes in several newspapers, while Mill was active trying to persuade the English public realm to prevent England from joining the South. Both shared an historical vision of the future in which human (...)
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  49.  14
    Helen Ruth McCabe (2014). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Persuasion. Informal Logic 34 (1):38-61.
    In his youth, John Stuart Mill followed his father’s philosophy of persuasion but, in 1830, Mill adopted a new philosophy of persuasion, trying to lead people incrementally towards the truth from their original stand-points rather than engage them antagonistically. Understanding this change helps us understand apparent contradictions in Mill’s cannon, as he disguises some of his more radical ideas in order to bring his audience to re-assess and authentically change their opinions. It also suggests a way of re-assessing the (...)
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  50.  14
    Hannah Tierney (forthcoming). A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer's Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer defends Frankfurt cases as an (...)
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