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Profile: John Spackman (Middlebury College)
  1. John Spackman (2014). Between Nihilism and Anti-Essentialism: A Conceptualist Interpretation of Nāgārjuna. Philosophy East and West 64 (1):151-173.
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  2. John Spackman (2013). Conceptual Atomism, Externalism, and the Gradient Applicability of Concepts. Journal of Philosophical Research 38:419-441.
    The most prominent recent model of how concepts can have gradient applicability—that is, apply more fully to some items than to others—is that supplied by the prototype theory. Such a model, however, assumes concepts to be internally individuated and structured, and it might thus be challenged by both concept externalism and conceptual atomism. This paper argues that neither of these challenges presents an obstacle to viewing some concepts as having gradient application, and develops a different model of the conditions for (...)
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  3. John Spackman (2013). Consciousness and the Prospects for Substance Dualism. Philosophy Compass 8 (11):1054-1065.
    There has in recent years been a significant surge of interest in non-materialist accounts of the mind. Property dualists hold that all substances (concrete particulars that persist over time) are material, but mental properties are distinct from physical properties. Substance dualists maintain that the mind or person is a non-material substance. This article considers the prospects for substance dualism given the current state of the debate. The best known type of substance dualism, Cartesian dualism, has traditionally faced a number of (...)
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  4. John Spackman (2012). Contemporary Philosophy of Mind and Buddhist Thought. Philosophy Compass 7 (10):741-751.
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  5. John Spackman (2012). Expressiveness, Ineffability, and Nonconceptuality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):303-314.
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  6. John Spackman (2006). The Tiantai Roots of Dōgen's Philosophy of Language and Thought. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):428-450.
    : Many recent studies of Dōgen have rightly emphasized that for Dōgen language and thought are capable of expressing the buddha dharma. But they have not recognized that this positive assessment of language rests on an underlying critique of the prevalent commonsense view that language functions by representing an independent reality. Focusing on Dōgen's use of apparently paradoxical language, it is suggested that in order to understand this critique we need to trace it back to its roots in the interpretation (...)
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  7. John Spackman (2002). Color, Relativism, and Realism. Philosophical Studies 108 (3):251-88.
    It is plausible to think that some animals perceive the world as coloreddifferently from the way humans perceive it. I argue that the best way ofaccommodating this fact is to adopt perceiver-relativism, the view that colorpredicates express relations between objects and types of perceivers.Perceiver-relativism makes no claim as to the identity of color properties;it is compatible with both physicalism and dispositionalism. I arguehowever for a response-dependence version of it according to which an object counts as red (for a type of (...)
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  8. John Spackman (1998). Expression Theory of Art. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. 1--139.
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