Search results for 'John Swenson-Wright' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gary Fuller, Robert Stecker & John P. Wright (eds.) (2000). John Locke, an Essay Concerning Human Understanding in Focus. Routledge.
    John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding is among the most important books in philosophy ever written. It is a difficult work dealing with many themes, including the origin of ideas; the extent and limits of human knowledge; the philosophy of perception; and religion and morality. This volume focuses on the last two topics and provides a clear and insightful survey of these overlooked aspects of Locke's best-known work. Four eminent Locke scholars present authoritative discussions of Locke's view on the (...)
     
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  2.  5
    James G. Buickerood & John P. Wright (2006). John William Yolton, 1921-2005. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (5):139 - 142.
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  3. James Buickerood & John Wright (2006). John William Yolton. Locke Studies 6:23-30.
     
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  4. John P. Wright (2010). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
     
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  5. John P. Wright (2012). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
     
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  6. John P. Wright (2009). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
     
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  7. John Wright (2014). Explaining Science's Success: Understanding How Scientific Knowledge Works. Routledge.
    Paul Feyeraband famously asked, what's so great about science? One answer is that it has been surprisingly successful in getting things right about the natural world, more successful than non-scientific or pre-scientific systems, religion or philosophy. Science has been able to formulate theories that have successfully predicted novel observations. It has produced theories about parts of reality that were not observable or accessible at the time those theories were first advanced, but the claims about those inaccessible areas have since turned (...)
     
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  8.  67
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). Focus Restored: Comments on John MacFarlane. Synthese 170 (3):457 - 482.
    In “Double Vision Two Questions about the Neo-Fregean Programme”, John MacFarlane’s raises two main questions: (1) Why is it so important to neo-Fregeans to treat expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’ as a species of singular term? What would be lost, if anything, if they were analysed instead as a type of quantifier-phrase, as on Russell’s Theory of Definite Descriptions? and (2) Granting—at least for the sake of argument—that Hume’s Principle may be used as a means of (...)
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  9.  17
    David Wright, The Misplaced Role of “Utilitarianism” in John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism.
    This thesis aims to provide the appropriate historical context for interpreting John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism. The central question considered here concerns two views of Mill's intentions for Utilitarianism, and whether the work should be read as Mill arguing for his own version of utilitarianism, or as an ecumenical document expressing and defending the views of many utilitarians. The first view, labeled the orthodox view, as defended by Roger Crisp, is probably the most commonly held view as to how to (...)
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  10. David Wright (1996). John Fryer and the Shanghai Polytechnic: Making Space for Science in Nineteenth-Century China. British Journal for the History of Science 29 (1):1-16.
    The introduction of modern Western science into late imperial China naturally involved the creation of new linguistic spaces through the translation of science textbooks and the formation of a modern scientific lexicon, but it also required translation in another, physical, sense through the creation of institutions whereby the new system of practices and ideas could be transmitted. The Shanghai Polytechnic, opened in 1876 under the direction of John Fryer, was promoted as an academy for the ‘extension of learning’; this (...)
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  11. Crispin Wright (2002). (Anti-)Sceptics Simple and Subtle: G. E. Moore and John McDowell. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):330-348.
  12. Crispin Wright (2008). Comment on John McDowell's "The Disjunctive Conception of Experience as Material for a Transcendental Argument". In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action and Knowledge. Oxford University Press 390.
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  13. N. T. Wright (1994). Book Review : The Love of Enemy and Nonretaliation in the New Testament, Edited by Willard M. Swartley. Louisville, Ky, Westminster/John Knox Press, 1992. Xv + 336 Pp. US$ 29.99. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):148-151.
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  14. Christopher J. H. Wright (1995). Book Review : Old Testament Ethics: A Paradigmatic Approach, by Waldemar Janzen. Louisville, Kentucky, Westminster/John Knox, 1994. 236pp. Pb. No Price. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (2):108-112.
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  15.  95
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright, Focus Restored Comment on John MacFarlane's “Double Vision: Two Questions About the Neo-Fregean Programme”.
    Anything worth regarding as logicism about number theory holds that its fundamental laws – in effect, the Dedekind-Peano axioms – may be known on the basis of logic and definitions alone. For Frege, the logic in question was that of the Begriffschrift – effectively, full impredicative second order logic - together with the resources for dealing with the putatively “logical objects” provided by Basic Law V of Grundgesetze. With this machinery in place, and with the course-of-values operator governed by Basic (...)
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  16.  9
    Terrence C. Wright (1985). Husserl and Contemporary Thought. Edited by John Sallis. Modern Schoolman 63 (1):73-75.
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  17.  4
    M. R. Wright (1981). John Sallis, Kenneth Maly: Heraclitean Fragments. A Companion Volume to the Heidegger/Fink Seminar on Heraclitus. Pp. Xi + 173. Alabama: The University of Alabama Press, 1980. £11.10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 31 (02):297-298.
  18.  25
    Jonathan Wright (2010). After Lives: A Guide to Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory. By John Casey. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):1084-1085.
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  19.  22
    H. W. Wright (1931). Book Review:Individualism Old and New. John Dewey. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (3):362-.
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  20.  8
    Art Wright (forthcoming). Book Review: John and Empire: Initial Explorations. [REVIEW] Interpretation 63 (1):87-88.
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  21.  4
    J. Robert Wright (1980). The Accounts of John de Stratton and John Gedeney, Constables of Bordeaux 1381-90: An Edition with Particular Notes on Their Ecclesiastical and Liturgical Significance. [REVIEW] Mediaeval Studies 42 (1):238-307.
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  22.  3
    Erik Olin Wright & Harry Brighouse (2002). Marx, Karl 1973, Grundrisse, New York: Vintage. Roemer, John 1986,'" Rational Choice" Marxism: Some Issues of Method and Substance', in Analytical Marxism, Edited by John Roemer, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [REVIEW] Historical Materialism 10 (1):193-222.
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  23.  1
    Susannah Wright & Stephanie Wilde (2016). Supporting Student Transitions 14–19. Approaches to Teaching and Learning. By John Bostock and Jane Wood. [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies 64 (1):124-126.
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  24.  2
    Derek Wright (1972). Motivation and Morality: A Response to John Wilson. Journal of Moral Education 2 (1):31-34.
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  25.  1
    J. Wright (1996). John Butler. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (4).
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  26.  1
    J. Robert Wright (1996). John Butler, The Quest for Becket's Bones: The Mystery of the Relics of St Thomas Becket of Canterbury. New Haven, Conn., and London: Yale University Press, 1995. Pp. Xii, 180; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Many Color and Black-and-White Illustrations, 1 Table. $25. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (4):930-931.
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  27.  5
    James John (2009). Review of Edmond Wright (Ed.), The Case for Qualia. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  28.  3
    David F. Swenson (1930). Second Generation of "The Chicago School":Essays in Philosophy T. V. Smith, W. K. Wright. Ethics 40 (3):402-.
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  29.  1
    T. R. Wright (1991). John Henry Newman: A Biography. History of European Ideas 13 (4):483-485.
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  30. R. A. Wright (1900). Book Review:Through Nature to God. John Fiske. [REVIEW] Ethics 10 (3):405-.
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  31. David F. Swenson (1930). Second Generation of "The Chicago School"Essays in PhilosophyT. V. Smith W. K. Wright. International Journal of Ethics 40 (3):402-415.
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  32. David Wright (2004). A Law Book For The Diaspora: Revision In The Study Of The Covenant Code By John Van Seters. [REVIEW] Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (1):129-131.
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  33. G. Wright (2002). John Christian Laursen (Ed.): Religious Toleration:The Variety of Rites' From Cyrus to Defoe. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (4):665-667.
  34. Nigel Wright (1996). John Krige and Arturo Russo, Europe in Space, 1960–1973. Noordwijk: European Space Agency Publications Division, 1994. Pp. Viii + 142, Illus. ISBN 92-9092-125-0. Dfl. 70.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 29 (2):252.
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  35. C. J. Wright (1944). Matthew Spinka, John Amos Comenius. That Incomparable Moravian. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 43:82.
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  36. R. A. Wright (1899). Through Nature to God, by John Fiske. [REVIEW] Ethics 10:405.
     
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  37. J. Robert Wright (1996). The Quest for Becket's Bones: The Mystery of the Relics of St. Thomas Becket of Canterbury.John Butler. Speculum 71 (4):930-931.
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  38.  60
    John P. Wright (2013). The Understanding. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press 148-70.
    The article discusses the varying conceptions of the faculty of ‘the understanding’ in 18th-century British philosophy and logic. Topics include the distinction between the understanding and the will, the traditional division of three acts of understanding and its critics, the naturalizing of human understanding, conceiving of the limits of human understanding, British innatism and the critique of empiricist conceptions of the understanding, and reconceiving the understanding and the elimination of scepticism. Authors discussed include Richard Price, James Harris, Zachary Mayne, Edward (...)
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  39. M. A. Stewart & John P. Wright (eds.) (1995). Hume and Hume's Connexions. Penn State University Press.
    Presenting significant new research on the moral and religious philosophy of David Hume, this volume illustrates the importance of intellectual context in understanding the work and career of one of the most important thinkers of the eighteenth century. Distinctive in its reappraisal of the influence of John Locke, Francis Hutcheson, and others, it examines how Hume reacted to, and in turn affected, other thinkers whose views, like his own, were bound up with specific philosophical, theological, and scientific traditions and (...)
     
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  40. Alexander Miller & Crispin Wright (2002). Rule-Following and Meaning. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, and José Zalabardo. This debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading of the (...)
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  41. Alexander Miller, Crispin Wright & Aleander Miller (2002). Rule-Following and Meaning. Routledge.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, Crispin Wright, and Jose Zalabardo. The debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading (...)
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  42. Alexander Miller & Crispin Wright (2014). Rule-Following and Meaning. Routledge.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, Crispin Wright, and Jose Zalabardo. The debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading (...)
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  43. Ariela Gross, Clarissa Hayward, Courtney Jung, John Kane, Adolph Reed Jr, Rogers Smith, Peter Swenson & Nomi Stolzenberg (2002). Problems, Methods, and Theories in the Study of Politics, or What's Wrong with Political Science and What to Do About It. Political Theory 30 (4):588-611.
  44. John Bengson, Marc A. Moffett & Jennifer C. Wright (2009). The Folk on Knowing How. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):387–401.
    It has been claimed that the attempt to analyze know-how in terms of propositional knowledge over-intellectualizes the mind. Exploiting the methods of so-called “experimental philosophy”, we show that the charge of over-intellectualization is baseless. Contra neo-Ryleans, who analyze know-how in terms of ability, the concrete-case judgments of ordinary folk are most consistent with the view that there exists a set of correct necessary and sufficient conditions for know-how that does not invoke ability, but rather a certain sort of propositional knowledge. (...)
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  45. J. N. Wright, A. E. Taylor, John Laird, S. R., F. C. S. Schiller, H. F. Hallett, J. L. Russell, S. S., A. C. Ewing, O. de Selincourt, E. J. Thomas & R. J. (1927). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 36 (144):500-524.
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  46. Hagop Sarkissian, John Park, David Tien, Jennifer Wright & Joshua Knobe (2011). Folk Moral Relativism. Mind and Language 26 (4):482-505.
    It has often been suggested that people's ordinary understanding of morality involves a belief in objective moral truths and a rejection of moral relativism. The results of six studies call this claim into question. Participants did offer apparently objectivist moral intuitions when considering individuals from their own culture, but they offered increasingly relativist intuitions considering individuals from increasingly different cultures or ways of life. The authors hypothesize that people do not have a fixed commitment to moral objectivism but instead tend (...)
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  47. John P. Wright (1990). Metaphysics and Physiology: Mind, Body, and the Animal Economy in Eighteenth-Century Scotland. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Clarendon Press 251-301.
  48. John P. Wright (2003). Stability and Justification in Hume's Treatise (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):562-564.
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  49. Jennifer Cole Wright & John Bengson (2009). Asymmetries in Judgments of Responsibility and Intentional Action. Mind and Language 24 (1):24-50.
    Abstract: Recent experimental research on the 'Knobe effect' suggests, somewhat surprisingly, that there is a bi-directional relation between attributions of intentional action and evaluative considerations. We defend a novel account of this phenomenon that exploits two factors: (i) an intuitive asymmetry in judgments of responsibility (e.g. praise/blame) and (ii) the fact that intentionality commonly connects the evaluative status of actions to the responsibility of actors. We present the results of several new studies that provide empirical evidence in support of this (...)
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  50. John Wright (2006). Personal Identity, Fission and Time Travel. Philosophia 34 (2):129-142.
    One problem that has formed the focus of much recent discussion on personal identity is the Fission Problem. The aim of this paper is to offer a novel solution to this problem.
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