Search results for 'John T. Hale' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John T. Hale (2011). What a Rational Parser Would Do. Cognitive Science 35 (3):399-443.score: 870.0
    This article examines cognitive process models of human sentence comprehension based on the idea of informed search. These models are rational in the sense that they strive to find a good syntactic analysis quickly. Informed search derives a new account of garden pathing that handles traditional counterexamples. It supports a symbolic explanation for local coherence as well as an algorithmic account of entropy reduction. The models are expressed in a broad framework for theories of human sentence comprehension.
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  2. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). Focus Restored: Comments on John MacFarlane. Synthese 170 (3):457 - 482.score: 300.0
    In “Double Vision Two Questions about the Neo-Fregean Programme”, John MacFarlane’s raises two main questions: (1) Why is it so important to neo-Fregeans to treat expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’ as a species of singular term? What would be lost, if anything, if they were analysed instead as a type of quantifier-phrase, as on Russell’s Theory of Definite Descriptions? and (2) Granting—at least for the sake of argument—that Hume’s Principle may be used as a means of (...)
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  3. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright, Focus Restored Comment on John MacFarlane's “Double Vision: Two Questions About the Neo-Fregean Programme”.score: 240.0
    Anything worth regarding as logicism about number theory holds that its fundamental laws – in effect, the Dedekind-Peano axioms – may be known on the basis of logic and definitions alone. For Frege, the logic in question was that of the Begriffschrift – effectively, full impredicative second order logic - together with the resources for dealing with the putatively “logical objects” provided by Basic Law V of Grundgesetze. With this machinery in place, and with the course-of-values operator governed by Basic (...)
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  4. Benjamin Hale (2007). John Dewey and Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):331–333.score: 240.0
  5. John Hale & David Reitter (2013). Introduction to the Issue on Computational Models of Natural Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):388-391.score: 240.0
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  6. John Hale (2006). Uncertainty About the Rest of the Sentence. Cognitive Science 30 (4):643-672.score: 240.0
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  7. John Hale (2007). Book Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 16 (2):217-220.score: 240.0
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  8. W. G. Hale, T. D. Seymour & J. H. Wright (1897). George Martin Lane. Frederic de Forest Allen. The Classical Review 11 (08):412-414.score: 240.0
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  9. Gary Backhaus, John Murungi, Jose-Hector Abraham, Azucena Cruz, Benjamin Hale, Jessica Hayes-Conroy, John E. Jalbert, Eduardo Mendieta, Troy Paddock, Christine Petto, Dennis E. Skocz & Alex Zukas (2006). Ecoscapes: Geographical Patternings of Relations. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
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  10. John Me Hale (1972). The Timetable Project. In Peter Albertson & Margery Barnett (eds.), Managing the Planet. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.score: 240.0
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  11. Benjamin Hale (ed.) (2008). Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press.score: 120.0
    This book offers a collection of contemporary essays that explore philosophical themes at work in chess. This collection includes essays on the nature of a game, the appropriateness of chess as a metaphor for life, and even deigns to query whether Garry Kasparov might—just might—be a cyborg. In twelve unique essays, contributed by philosophers with a broad range of expertise in chess, this book poses both serious and playful questions about this centuries-old pastime. -/- Perhaps more interestingly, philosophers have often (...)
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  12. William Hale (2001). Robert Shackleton and the Shackleton Collection. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 83 (1):169-182.score: 120.0
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  13. John Crook (1965). John Bishop: Nero: The Man and the Legend. Pp. 208; 14 Photographs. London: Robert Hale, 1964. Cloth, 21s. Net. The Classical Review 15 (03):364-365.score: 78.0
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  14. J. S. Morrison (1967). Helen Goes Pop John Pollard: Helen of Troy. Pp. 192; 11 Ill. London: Robert Hale, 1965. Cloth, 21s. The Classical Review 17 (01):75-77.score: 72.0
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  15. John Burgess, Mending the Master.score: 45.0
    Fixing Frege is one of the most important investigations to date of Fregean approaches to the foundations of mathematics. In addition to providing an unrivalled survey of the technical program to which Frege’s writings have given rise, the book makes a large number of improvements and clarifications. Anyone with an interest in the philosophy of mathematics will enjoy and benefit from the careful and well informed overview provided by the first of its three chapters. Specialists will find the book an (...)
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  16. John P. Burgess (2010). Review of B. Hale and A. Hoffmann (Eds.), Modality: Metaphysics, Logic, and Epistemology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).score: 24.0
  17. Jerry Fodor & Ernie Lepore, Morphemes Matter; the Continuing Case Against Lexical Decomposition (Or: Please Don't Play That Again, Sam).score: 24.0
    The idea that quotidian, middle-level concepts typically have internal structure -- definitional, statistical, or whatever -- plays a central role in practically every current approach to cognition. Correspondingly, the idea that words that express quotidian, middle-level concepts have complex representations "at the semantic level" is recurrent in linguistics; it's the defining thesis of what is often called "lexical semantics," and it unites the generative and interpretive traditions of grammatical analysis. Recently, Hale and Keyser (1993) have provided a budget of (...)
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  18. Manfred Krifka, Manner in Dative Alternation.score: 24.0
    There are a number of well-known restrictions for the Dative Alternation (cf. Green (1974), Oehrle (1976), Gropen, Pinker, Hollander, & Goldberg (1989), Pinker (1989), Pesetsky (1992), Levin (1993). I will show that several of the low-level semantic restrictions are consequences of a more general one involving the incorporation of a manner component into the meaning of the verb. These restrictions can be explained by assuming two distinct representations of verbs participating in the Dative Alternation: The PO frame expresses movement of (...)
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  19. Howard M. Robinson (ed.) (1993). Objections to Physicalism. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Physicalism has, over the past twenty years, become almost an orthodoxy, especially in the philosophy of mind. Many philosophers, however, feel uneasy about this development, and this volume is intended as a collective response to it. Together these papers, written by philosophers from Britain, the United States, and Australasia, show that physicalism faces enormous problems in every area in which it is discussed. The contributors not only investigate the well-known difficulties that physicalism has in accommodating sensory consciousness, but also bring (...)
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  20. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2012). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law: The Criminal Law and Bioethical Conflict: Walking the Tightrope. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; (...)
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  21. Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett & Suzanne Ost (eds.) (2013). Bioethics, Medicine, and the Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction - when criminal law encounters bioethics: a case of tensions and incompatibilities or an apt forum for resolving ethical conflict? Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett and Suzanne Ost; Part I. Death, Dying, and the Criminal Law: 2. Euthanasia and assisted suicide should, when properly performed by a doctor in an appropriate case, be decriminalised John Griffiths; 3. Five flawed arguments for decriminalising euthanasia John Keown; 4. Euthanasia excused: between prohibition and permission Richard Huxtable; (...)
     
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  22. C. C. Bayley (1988). JR Hale, War and Society in Renaissance Europe, 1450–1620.(Fontana History of European War and Society.) Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. Paper. Pp. 282. $9.95. First Published in London by Fontana Paperbacks, 1985. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (2):406-407.score: 24.0
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  23. Lee W. Gibbs (2012). John Hales (1582-1656). A Tolerant Man Living in an Intolerant Age. Perichoresis 10 (2):195-205.score: 24.0
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  24. Harold T. Hodes (1992). Book Review. Abstract Objects. Bob Hale. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 24 (3):146-48.score: 24.0
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  25. Beryl Smalley (1980). The Gospels in the Paris Schools in the Late 12th and Early 13th Centuries: Peter the Chanter, Hugh of St. Cher, Alexander of Hales, John of la Rochelle. [REVIEW] Franciscan Studies 40 (1):298-369.score: 24.0
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  26. David G. Smith (2011). Identity Crisis (S.) Hales, (T.) Hodos (Edd.) Material Culture and Social Identities in the Ancient World. Pp. Xvi + 339, Figs, Ills, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Cased, £55, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-76774-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):586-589.score: 24.0
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  27. John MacFarlane (2009). Double Vision: Two Questions About the Neo-Fregean Program. Synthese 170 (3):443 - 456.score: 12.0
    Much of The Reason’s Proper Study is devoted to defending the claim that simply by stipulating an abstraction principle for the “number-of” functor, we can simultaneously fix a meaning for this functor and acquire epistemic entitlement to the stipulated principle. In this paper, I argue that the semantic and epistemological principles Hale and Wright offer in defense of this claim may be too strong for their purposes. For if these principles are correct, it is hard to see why they (...)
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  28. John O'Neill (1989). Two Problems of Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):121-125.score: 12.0
    In this paper I distinguish two problems of induction: a problem of the uniformity of nature and a problem of the variety of nature. I argue that the traditional problem of induction that Popper poses—the problem of uniformity—is not that which is relevant to science. The problem relevant to science is that of the variety of nature. *I would like to thank Bob Hale, Russell Keat and the Journal's referee for their comments on earlier drafts of this paper.
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  29. Roy T. Cook (2002). The State of the Economy: Neo-Logicism and Inflationt. Philosophia Mathematica 10 (1):43-66.score: 12.0
    In this paper I examine the prospects for a successful neo–logicist reconstruction of the real numbers, focusing on Bob Hale's use of a cut-abstraction principle. There is a serious problem plaguing Hale's project. Natural generalizations of this principle imply that there are far more objects than one would expect from a position that stresses its epistemological conservativeness. In other words, the sort of abstraction needed to obtain a theory of the reals is rampantly inflationary. I also indicate briefly (...)
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  30. John Robert Gareth Williams (2008). Gavagai Again. Synthese 164 (2):235 - 259.score: 12.0
    Quine (1960, Word and object. Cambridge, Mass.:MIT Press, ch. 2) claims that there are a variety of equally good schemes for translating or interpreting ordinary talk. ‘Rabbit’ might be taken to divide its reference over rabbits, over temporal slices of rabbits, or undetached parts of rabbits, without significantly affecting which sentences get classified as true and which as false. This is the basis of his famous ‘argument from below’ to the conclusion that there can be no fact of the matter (...)
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  31. John C. Waller (2001). Gentlemanly Men of Science: Sir Francis Galton and the Professionalization of the British Life-Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):83 - 114.score: 10.0
    Because Francis Galton (1822-1911) was a well-connected gentleman scientist with substantial private means, the importance of the role he played in the professionalization of the Victorian life-sciences has been considered anomalous. In contrast to the X-clubbers, he did not seem to have any personal need for the reforms his Darwinist colleagues were advocating. Nor for making common cause with individuals haling from social strata clearly inferior to his own. However, in this paper I argue that Galton quite realistically discerned in (...)
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  32. Roy Kenneth Hack (1931/1970). God in Greek Philosophy to the Time of Socrates. New York,B. Franklin.score: 9.3
    CHAPTER I GOD AND THE GREEK PHILOSOPHERS T HALES of Miletus, commonly known as the first philosopher in this western world, said that Water was the cause ...
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  33. Steven D. Hales (ed.) (2007). Beer & Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking. Blackwell Pub..score: 8.0
    A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption. Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages as a medical cure; to inspect Immanuel Kant’s (...)
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  34. Emilie T. Reas, Sarah I. Gimbel, Jena B. Hales & James B. Brewer (2011). Search-Related Suppression of Hippocampus and Default Network Activity During Associative Memory Retrieval. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 8.0
  35. F. N. Hales, W. H. Fairbrother, F. C. S. Schiller, S. H., A. E. Taylor, David Morrison, F. G. Nutt, B. Russell, W. R. Boyce Gibson, C. A. F. Rhys Davids, B. W. & T. Loveday (1903). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 12 (46):255-274.score: 8.0
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  36. Emilie T. Reas, Sarah I. Gimbel, Jena B. Hales & James B. Brewer (2013). Erratum: Search-Related Suppression of Hippocampus and Default Network Activity During Associative Memory Retrieval. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 8.0
  37. Steven D. Hales (2007). Mill V. Miller, or Higher and Lower Pleasures. In Steven Hales (ed.), Beer & Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 4.0
    I offer an interpretation of John Stuart Mill's theory of higher and lower pleasures in his Utilitarianism. I argue that the quality of pleasure is best understood as the density of pleasure per unit of delivery. Mill is illustrated with numerous beer examples.
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  38. Steven D. Hales (2009). A Call to the Women's Center. Think 22 (8):25-28.score: 4.0
    ‘Hello, this is the Women’s Center, may I help you?’ ‘Yeah, uh, hi. I don’t really know if I should be calling you, but a friend of mine told me to call. She thought it was a good idea.’ ‘Sure. Let me ask before we go on – are you in a safe place to talk? Are you in any immediate danger?’ ‘I think I can talk. I dunno, I guess I’m not sure. I mean, I don’t think he’s here (...)
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  39. Steven D. Hales (2004). Intuition, Revelation, and Relativism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):271 – 295.score: 4.0
    This paper defends the view that philosophical propositions are merely relatively true, i.e. true relative to a doxastic perspective defined at least in part by a non-inferential belief-acquiring method. Here is the strategy: first, the primary way that contemporary philosophers defend their views is through the use of rational intuition, and this method delivers non-inferential, basic beliefs which are then systematized and brought into reflective equilibrium. Second, Christian theologians use exactly the same methodology, only replacing intuition with revelation. Third, intuition (...)
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