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  1.  53
    John Tasioulas (2006). Punishment and Repentance. Philosophy 81 (2):279-322.
    In philosophical writings, the practice of punishment standardly features as a terrain over which comprehensive moral theories—in the main, versions of ‘consequentialism’ and ‘deontology’—have fought a prolonged and inconclusive battle. The grip of this top-down model of the relationship between philosophical theory and punitive practice is so tenacious that even the most seemingly innocent concern with the ‘consequences’ of punishment is often read, if not as an endorsement of consequentialism, then at least as the registering of a consequentialist point. But (...)
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  2.  74
    Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
    The other contributions address philosophical problems arising in specific domains of international law, such as human rights law, international economic law, ...
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  3. John Tasioulas (2002). Human Rights, Universality and the Values of Personhood: Retracing Griffin's Steps. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):79–100.
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  4. John Tasioulas (2010). Taking Rights Out of Human Rights. Ethics 120 (4):647-678.
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  5. John Tasioulas (2009). Are Human Rights Essentially Triggers for Intervention? Philosophy Compass 4 (6):938-950.
    The orthodox conception of human rights holds that human rights are moral rights possessed by all human beings simply in virtue of their humanity. In recent years, advocates of a 'political' conception of human rights have criticized this view on the grounds that it overlooks the distinctive political function performed by human rights. This article evaluates the arguments of two such critics, John Rawls and Joseph Raz, who characterize the political function of human rights as that of potential triggers for (...)
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  6. John Tasioulas (2011). Where is the Love? The Topography of Mercy. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. OUP Oxford
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  7. John Tasioulas (1998). Consequences of Ethical Relativism. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):156–171.
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  8. John Tasioulas, Allen Buchanan, Rainer Forst, James Griffin, Mikhail Valdman & Louis‐Philippe Hodgson (2010). 10. Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age (Pp. 864-869). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4).
     
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  9.  15
    John Tasioulas (2006). John Tasioulas. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):237–264.
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  10.  9
    John Tasioulas (2003). VI-Mercy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):101-132.
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  11.  69
    John Tasioulas (2013). Human Rights, Legitimacy, and International Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1):1-25.
    The article begins with reflections on the nature, and basis, of human rights considered as moral standards. It recommends an orthodox view of their nature, as moral rights possessed by all human beings simply in virtue of their humanity and discoverable through the workings of natural reason, that makes them strongly continuous with natural rights. It then offers some criticisms of recent attempts to depart from orthodoxy by explicating human rights by reference to the supposedly constitutive connection they bear to (...)
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  12.  26
    John Tasioulas (2005). Global Justice Without End? Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):3-29.
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  13. John Tasioulas (2007). The Moral Reality of Human Rights. In Thomas Pogge (ed.), Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Co-Published with Unesco. OUP Oxford
     
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  14.  47
    John Tasioulas (2003). Mercy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):101–132.
    Mercy is a form of charity towards wrongdoers that justifies punishing them less severely than they deserve according to justice. Three main objections to mercy, or its exercise by organs of the state-that it is irrational, unjust and procedurally unfair-are addressed in the course of defending mercy as a value that has a place in deliberation about criminal punishment. The paper draws on both the communicative theory of punishment and aspects of existing legal practice in mounting this defence.
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  15.  18
    John Tasioulas & Benjamin C. Zipursky (unknown). John Finnis 45 Reasons and Abilities: Some Preliminaries John Gardner 63. American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1).
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  16.  5
    John Tasioulas (2002). From Utopia to Kazanistan: John Rawls and the Law of Peoples. Review Article. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):367-396.
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  17.  4
    Effy Vayena & John Tasioulas (2015). “We the Scientists”: A Human Right to Citizen Science. Philosophy and Technology 28 (3):479-485.
    The flourishing of citizen science is an exciting phenomenon with the potential to contribute significantly to scientific progress. However, we lack a framework for addressing in a principled and effective manner the pressing ethical questions it raises. We argue that at the core of any such framework must be the human right to science. Moreover, we stress an almost entirely neglected dimension of this right—the entitlement it confers on all human beings to participate in the scientific process in all of (...)
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  18. John Tasioulas (2010). The Legitimacy of International Law. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. OUP Oxford
     
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  19. John Tasioulas (2013). Justice, Equality, and Rights. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  20.  29
    John Tasioulas (1998). Relativism, Realism, and Reflection. Inquiry 41 (4):377 – 410.
    The paper undertakes a critical examination of three key strands- relativism, antirealism, and reflection- in Bernard Williams's sceptical interpretation of ethical thought. The anti-realist basis of Williams's 'relativism of distance' is identified and the way this threatens to render his relativism more subversive than initially appears. Focusing on Williams's anti-realism, the paper argues that it fails because it is caught on the horns of a dilemma: either it draws on a conception of reality that is metaphysically incoherent, or else it (...)
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  21.  8
    Jacqueline Tasioulas & John Tasioulas (2013). 'Lawful Mercy'in Measure for Measure. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press 219.
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  22.  1
    Thomas Hurka & John Tasioulas (2006). Games and the Good. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):237-264.
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  23.  14
    John Tasioulas (2009). Philosophy, Criticism and Community: A Response to Duff. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):259-268.
    abstract A critical discussion of R. A. Duff's account of 'internal' and 'external' criticism using two examples drawn from recent work on international justice — Pogge on global poverty and Duff on international criminal jurisdiction.
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  24. Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    International law has recently emerged as the subject-matter of an exciting new field of philosophical investigation. The Philosophy of International Law contains 29 cutting-edge essays by leading philosophers and international lawyers, all published here in English for the first time, that address the central philosophical questions about international law. The volume's overarching theme is the moral and political values that should guide the assessment and development of international law and institutions. Some of the essays tackle general topics such as the (...)
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  25. John Tasioulas (2010). Justice and Punishment. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge
     
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  26. John Tasioulas (1997). Law, Values and Social Practices. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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