65 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: John Turri (University of Waterloo)
  1. John Turri, Doomed to Fail: The Sad Epistemological Fate.
    For beings like us, no ontological argument can possibly succeed. They are doomed to fail. The point of an ontological argument is to enable nonempirical knowledge of its conclusion, namely, that God exists. But no ontological argument could possibly enable us to know its conclusion nonempirically, and so must fail in that sense.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Turri, Epistemic Situationism and Cognitive Ability.
    Leading virtue epistemologists defend the view that knowledge must proceed from intellectual virtue and they understand virtues either as refned character traits cultivated by the agent over time through deliberate effort, or as reliable cognitive abilities. Philosophical situationists argue that results from empirical psychology should make us doubt that we have either sort of epistemic virtue, thereby discrediting virtue epistemology’s empirical adequacy. I evaluate this situationist challenge and outline a successor to virtue epistemology: abilism . Abilism delivers all the main (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri, In the Thick of Moral Motivation.
    We accomplish three things in this paper. First, we expose the motivational internalism/externalism debate in moral psychology as a false dichotomy born of ambiguity. Second, we provide further evidence for a crucial distinction between two different categories of belief in folk psychology: thick belief and thin belief. Third, we demonstrate how careful attention to deep features of folk psychology can help diagnose and defuse seemingly intractable philosophical disagreement in metaethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter Klein & John Turri (eds.) (forthcoming). Ad Infinitum: New Essays on Epistemological Infinitism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter Klein & John Turri (forthcoming). Infinitism. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Clayton Littlejohn & John Turri (eds.) (forthcoming). Epistemic Norms: New Essays on Action, Belief and Assertion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  7. David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri (forthcoming). When Words Speak Louder Than Actions: Delusion, Belief and the Power of Assertion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    People suffering from severe monothematic delusions, such as Capgras and Cotard patients, regularly assert extraordinary and unlikely things. For example, some say that their loved ones have been replaced by impostors. A popular view in philosophy and cognitive science is that such monothematic delusions aren’t beliefs because they don’t guide behavior and affect in the way that beliefs do. Or, if they are beliefs, they are somehow anomalous, atypical, or marginal beliefs. We present evidence from four studies that folk psychology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John Turri (forthcoming). Epistemology. In Byron Kaldis (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John Turri (forthcoming). From Virtue Epistemology to Abilism: Theoretical and Empirical Developments. In Tbd (ed.), TBD.
    I review several theoretical and empirical developments relevant to assessing contemporary virtue epistemology’s theory of knowledge. What emerges is a leaner theory of knowledge that is more empirically adequate, better captures the ordinary conception of knowledge, and is ripe for cross-fertilization with cognitive science. I call this view abilism. Along the way I identify several topics for future research.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John Turri (forthcoming). Knowledge. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Turri (forthcoming). Review of John Greco, Achieving Knowledge. [REVIEW] Mind.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John Turri (forthcoming). Skeptical Appeal: The Source-Content Bias. Cognitive Science.
    Radical skepticism is the view that we know nothing, or at least next to nothing. Nearly no one actually believes that skepticism is true. Yet it has remained a serious topic of discussion for millennia and it looms large in popular culture. What explains its persistent and widespread appeal? How does the skeptic get us to doubt what we ordinarily take ourselves to know? I present evidence from two experiments that classic skeptical arguments gain potency from an interaction between two (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Turri & Peter Blouw (forthcoming). Excuse Validation: A Study in Rule-Breaking. Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Can judging that an agent blamelessly broke a rule lead us to claim, paradoxically, that no rule was broken at all? Surprisingly, it can. Across seven experiments, we document and explain the phenomenon of excuse validation. We found when an agent blamelessly breaks a rule, it significantly distorts people’s description of the agent’s conduct. Roughly half of people deny that a rule was broken. The results suggest that people engage in excuse validation in order to avoid indirectly blaming others for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John Turri, Wesley Buckwalter & Peter Blouw (forthcoming). Knowledge and Luck. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review.
    Nearly all success is due to some mix of ability and luck. But some successes we attribute to the agent’s ability, whereas others we attribute to luck. To better understand the criteria distinguishing credit from luck, we conducted a series of four studies on knowledge attributions. Knowledge is an achievement that involves reaching the truth. But many factors affecting the truth are beyond our control and reaching the truth is often partly due to luck. Which sorts of luck are compatible (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Turri & Ori Friedman (forthcoming). Winners and Losers in the Folk Epistemology of Lotteries. In James Beebe (ed.), Advances in Experimental Epistemology.
    We conducted five experiments that reveal some main contours of the folk epistemology of lotteries. The folk tend to think that you don't know that your lottery ticket lost, based on the long odds ("statistical cases"); by contrast, the folk tend to think that you do know that your lottery ticket lost, based on a news report ("testimonial cases"). We evaluate three previous explanations for why people deny knowledge in statistical cases: the justification account, the chance account, and the statistical (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Matthew A. Benton & John Turri (2014). Iffy Predictions and Proper Expectations. Synthese 191 (8):1857-1866.
    What individuates the speech act of prediction? The standard view is that prediction is individuated by the fact that it is the unique speech act that requires future-directed content. We argue against this view and two successor views. We then lay out several other potential strategies for individuating prediction, including the sort of view we favor. We suggest that prediction is individuated normatively and has a special connection to the epistemic standards of expectation. In the process, we advocate some constraints (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri (2014). Telling, Showing and Knowing: A Unified Theory of Pedagogical Norms. Analysis 74 (1):16-20.
    Pedagogy is a pillar of human culture and society. Telling each other information and showing each other how to do things comes naturally to us. A strong case has been made that declarative knowledge is the norm of assertion, which is our primary way of telling others information. This article presents an analogous case for the hypothesis that procedural knowledge is the norm of instructional demonstration, which is a primary way of showing others how to do things. Knowledge is the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. J. Charles Millar, John Turri & Ori Friedman (2014). For the Greater Goods? Ownership Rights and Utilitarian Moral Judgment. Cognition 133 (1):79-84.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. John Turri (2014). The Problem of ESEE Knowledge. Ergo 1 (4):101-127.
    Traditionally it has been thought that the moral valence of a proposition is, strictly speaking, irrelevant to whether someone knows that the proposition is true, and thus irrelevant to the truth-value of a knowledge ascription. On this view, it’s no easier to know, for example, that a bad thing will happen than that a good thing will happen (other things being equal). But a series of very surprising recent experiments suggest that this is actually not how we view knowledge. On (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Wesley Buckwalter, David Rose & John Turri (2013). Belief Through Thick and Thin. Noûs 47 (3).
    We distinguish between two categories of belief—thin belief and thick belief—and provide evidence that they approximate genuinely distinct categories within folk psychology. We use the distinction to make informative predictions about how laypeople view the relationship between knowledge and belief. More specifically, we show that if the distinction is genuine, then we can make sense of otherwise extremely puzzling recent experimental findings on the entailment thesis (i.e. the widely held philosophical thesis that knowledge entails belief). We also suggest that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Peter D. Klein & John Turri, Infinitism in Epistemology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Infinitism in Epistemology This article provides an overview of infinitism in epistemology. Infinitism is a family of views in epistemology about the structure of knowledge and epistemic justification. It contrasts naturally with coherentism and foundationalism. All three views agree that knowledge or justification requires an appropriately structured chain of reasons. What form may such a […].
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rachel McKinnon & John Turri (2013). Irksome Assertions. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):123-128.
    The Knowledge Account of Assertion (KAA) says that knowledge is the norm of assertion: you may assert a proposition only if you know that it’s true. The primary support for KAA is an explanatory inference from a broad range of linguistic data. The more data that KAA well explains, the stronger the case for it, and the more difficult it is for the competition to keep pace. In this paper we critically assess a purported new linguistic datum, which, it has (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Matthias Steup & John Turri (eds.) (2013). Contemporary Debates in Epistemology. Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John Turri (2013). A Conspicuous Art: Putting Gettier to the Test. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (10).
    Professional philosophers say it’s obvious that a Gettier subject does not know. But experimental philosophers and psychologists have argued that laypeople and non-Westerners view Gettier subjects very differently, based on experiments where laypeople tend to ascribe knowledge to Gettier subjects. I argue that when effectively probed, laypeople and non-Westerners unambiguously agree that Gettier subjects do not know.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. John Turri (2013). Bi-Level Virtue Epistemology. In , Virtuous Thoughts: The Philosophy of Ernest Sosa. Springer. 147--164.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Turri (2013). Epistemology: A Guide. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Designed to accompany Epistemology: An Anthology or stand alone as a concise primer, this is a straightforward and accessible introduction to contemporary epistemology for those studying the topic for the first time.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John Turri (2013). Infinitism, Finitude and Normativity. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):791-795.
    I evaluate two new objections to an infinitist account of epistemic justification, and conclude that they fail to raise any new problems for infinitism. The new objections are a refined version of the finite-mind objection, which says infinitism demands more than finite minds can muster, and the normativity objection, which says infinitism entails that we are epistemically blameless in holding all our beliefs. I show how resources deployed in response to the most popular objection to infinitism, the original finite-mind objection, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Turri (2013). Knowledge and Suberogatory Assertion. Philosophical Studies (3):1-11.
    I accomplish two things in this paper. First I expose some important limitations of the contemporary literature on the norms of assertion and in the process illuminate a host of new directions and forms that an account of assertional norms might take. Second I leverage those insights to suggest a new account of the relationship between knowledge and assertion, which arguably outperforms the standard knowledge account.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John Turri (2013). Knowledge Guaranteed. Noûs 47 (3):602-612.
    What is the relationship between saying ‘I know that Q’ and guaranteeing that Q? John Austin, Roderick Chisholm and Wilfrid Sellars all agreed that there is some important connection, but disagreed over what exactly it was. In this paper I discuss each of their accounts and present a new one of my own. Drawing on speech-act theory and recent research on the epistemic norms of speech acts, I suggest that the relationship is this: by saying ‘I know that Q’, you (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Turri (2013). Liberal Thinking. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):515-533.
    When you think about a particular object, what makes your thought about that object? Roderick Chisholm, Ernest Sosa and Michael McKinsey have defended ?latitudinarian?, ?descriptivist?, or what I call ?liberal? answers to that question. In this paper I carefully consider the motivation for these liberal views and show how it extends in unanticipated ways to motivate views that are considerably more liberal.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John Turri (2013). Pyrrhonian Skepticism Meets Speech-Act Theory. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):83-98.
    This paper applies speech-act theory to craft a new response to Pyrrhonian skepticism and diagnose its appeal. Carefully distinguishing between different levels of language-use and noting their interrelations can help us identify a subtle mistake in a key Pyrrhonian argument.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John Turri (2013). That's Outrageous. Theoria 79 (2):167-171.
    I show how non-presentists ought to respond to a popular objection originally due to Arthur Prior and lately updated by Dean Zimmerman. Prior and Zimmerman say that non-presentism cannot account for the fittingness of certain emotional responses to things past. But presentism gains no advantage here, because it is equally incapable of accounting for the fittingness of certain other emotional responses to things past, in particular moral outrage.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John Turri (2013). The Test of Truth: An Experimental Investigation of the Norm of Assertion. Cognition 129 (2):279-291.
  34. John Turri (2013). Unreliable Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2).
    There is a virtual consensus in contemporary epistemology that knowledge must be reliably produced. Everyone, it seems, is a reliabilist about knowledge in that sense. I present and defend two arguments that unreliable knowledge is possible. My first argument proceeds from an observation about the nature of achievements, namely, that achievements can proceed from unreliable abilities. My second argument proceeds from an observation about the epistemic efficacy of explanatory inference, namely, that inference to the best explanation seems to produce knowledge, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Turri (ed.) (2013). Virtuous Thoughts: The Philosophy of Ernest Sosa. Springer.
    9 We should not expect any significant difference in the nature of the thoughts expressed by means of them. Now, in the case of anaphoric uses, what typically makes the individual salient is a descriptive characterization available from ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. John Turri (2012). Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity, by John Greco. Mind 121 (481):183-187.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. John Turri (2012). A Puzzle About Withholding. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):355-364.
    This paper presents a puzzle about justification and withholding. The puzzle arises in a special case where experts advise us to not withhold judgment. My main thesis is simply that the puzzle is genuinely a puzzle, and so leads us to rethink some common assumptions in epistemology, specifically assumptions about the nature of justification and doxastic attitudes. Section 1 introduces the common assumptions. Section 2 presents the puzzle case. Section 3 assesses the puzzle case. Section 4 explains the choice we're (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. John Turri (2012). Is Knowledge Justified True Belief? Synthese 184 (3):247-259.
    Is knowledge justified true belief? Most philosophers believe that the answer is clearly ‘no’, as demonstrated by Gettier cases. But Gettier cases don’t obviously refute the traditional view that knowledge is justified true belief (JTB). There are ways of resisting Gettier cases, at least one of which is partly successful. Nevertheless, when properly understood, Gettier cases point to a flaw in JTB, though it takes some work to appreciate just what it is. The nature of the flaw helps us better (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John Turri (2012). Reasons, Answers, and Goals. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):491-499.
    I discuss two arguments against the view that reasons are propositions. I consider responses to each argument, including recent responses due to Mark Schroeder, and suggest further responses of my own. In each case, the discussion proceeds by comparing reasons to answers and goals.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John Greco & John Turri (2011). Virtue Epistemology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John Turri (2011). A New And Improved Argument For A Necessary Being. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):357–359.
    I suggest two improvements to Joshua Rasmussen’s intriguing recent argument that a causally powerful being necessarily exists.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Turri (2011). Believing For a Reason. Erkenntnis 74 (3):383-397.
    This paper explains what it is to believe something for a reason. My thesis is that you believe something for a reason just in case the reason non-deviantly causes your belief. In the course of arguing for my thesis, I present a new argument that reasons are causes, and offer an informative account of causal non-deviance.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Turri (2011). Contingent A Priori Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):327-344.
    I argue that you can have a priori knowledge of propositions that neither are nor appear necessarily true. You can know a priori contingent propositions that you recognize as such. This overturns a standard view in contemporary epistemology and the traditional view of the a priori, which restrict a priori knowledge to necessary truths, or at least to truths that appear necessary.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. John Turri (2011). Intellectual Virtues. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):793-797.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. John Turri (2011). Critical Notice of Robert C Roberts and W. Jay Wood, Intellectual Virtues: An Essay in Regulative Epistemology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):793-797.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John Turri (2011). Knowledge and Skepticism. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (2):155-157.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Turri (2011). Manifest Failure: The Gettier Problem Solved. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (8).
    This paper provides a principled and elegant solution to the Gettier problem. The key move is to draw a general metaphysical distinction and conscript it for epistemological purposes. Section 1 introduces the Gettier problem. Sections 2–5 discuss instructively wrong or incomplete previous proposals. Section 6 presents my solution and explains its virtues. Section 7 answers the most common objection.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. John Turri (2011). Mythology of the Factive. Logos and Episteme 2 (1):143-152.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. John Turri (2011). Promises to Keep: Speech Acts and the Value of Reflective Knowledge. Logos and Episteme 2 (3):583-590.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. John Turri (2011). Review of Robert C. Roberts and W. Jay Wood, Intellectual Virtues. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):793–797.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 65