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John W. Cook [26]John Webber Cook [1]
  1. John W. Cook (2010). Locating Wittgenstein. Philosophy 85 (2):273-289.
    Wittgenstein wrote ‘While thinking philosophically we see problems in places where there are none. It is for philosophy to show that there are no problems’. He meant that the ‘problems’ philosophers grapple with are of their own making. In a related remark he said: ‘This is the essence of a philosophical problem. The question itself is the result of a muddle. And when the question is removed, this is not by answering it’. Even more explicitly he said: ‘All that philosophy (...)
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  2. John W. Cook (2008). Bouwsma on Wittgenstein's Philosophical Method. Philosophical Investigations 31 (4):285-317.
    It is argued that Wittgenstein was a greatly misunderstood philosopher, both as regards his own philosophical views and his ideas about philosophical method. O. K. Bouwsma's interpretation of Wittgenstein is used to illustrate the most common misunderstandings.
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  3. John W. Cook (2007). Did Wittgenstein Speak with the Vulgar or Think with the Learned? Or Did He Do Both? Philosophy 82 (2):213-233.
    Wittgenstein has often been criticized, and even dismissed, for being a patron of ordinary language, a champion of the vernacular, a defender of the status quo. One critic has written: 'When Wittgenstein set up the actual use of language as a standard, that was equivalent to accepting a certain set up of culture and belief as a standard ... It is lucky no such philosophy was thought of until recently or we should still be under the sway of witch doctors (...)
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  4. John W. Cook (2004). The Undiscovered Wittgenstein: The Twentieth Century's Most Misunderstood Philosopher. Humanity Books.
    Who was Wittgenstein? -- Wittgenstein, neutral monism, and privacy -- Common sense, skepticism, and reductionism -- An ordinary language philosopher? -- Meaning and verification -- Investigating Wittgenstein's practice -- On being fair to Wittgenstein -- Wittgenstein and conceptual relativism -- Language-games -- The wages of empiricism -- Are there objective scientific truths? -- Belief, superstition, and religion -- Wittgenstein on primitive practices -- Religious belief and reductionism -- Are there religious language-games? -- A failed defense of Wittgenstein -- Preconceptions and (...)
     
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  5. John W. Cook (2000). Wittgenstein, Empiricism, and Language. Oxford University Press.
    This provocative study exposes the ways in which Wittgenstein's philosophical views have been misunderstood, including the failure to recognize the reductionist character of Wittgenstein's work. Author John Cook provides well-documented proof that Wittgenstein did not hold views commonly attributed to him, arguing that Wittgenstein's later work was mistakenly seen as a development of G. E. Moore's philosophy--which Wittgenstein in fact vigorously attacked. He also points to an underestimation of Russell's influence on Wittgenstein's thinking. Cook goes on to show how these (...)
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  6. John W. Cook (1999). Morality and Cultural Differences. Oxford University Press.
    The scholars who defend or dispute moral relativism, the idea that a moral principle cannot be applied to people whose culture does not accept it, have concerned themselves with either the philosophical or anthropological aspects of relativism. This study, shows that in order to arrive at a definitive appraisal of moral relativism, it is necessary to understand and investigate both its anthropological and philosophical aspects. Carefully examining the arguments for and against moral relativism, Cook exposes not only that anthropologists have (...)
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  7. John W. Cook (1997). How to Read Wittgenstein. Philosophical Investigations 20 (3):224–245.
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  8. John W. Cook (1994). Wittgenstein's Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    Wittgenstein's Metaphysics offers a radical new interpretation of the fundamental ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein. It takes issue with the conventional view that after 1930 Wittgenstein rejected the philosophy of the Tractatus and developed a wholly new conception of philosophy. By tracing the evolution of Wittgenstein's ideas Cook shows that they are neither as original nor as difficult as is often supposed. Wittgenstein was essentially an empiricist, and the difference between his early views (as set forth in the Tractatus) and the (...)
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  9. John W. Cook (1988). Wittgenstein and Religious Belief. Philosophy 63 (246):427-452.
    I find myself in profound disagreement with Wittgenstein's philosophy of religion and hence in disagreement also with those philosophers who have undertaken to elaborate and defend Wittgenstein's position. My principal objection is to the idea that religion is a language-game and that because of the kind of language-game it is, religious believers are not to be thought of as necessarily harbouring beliefs about the world over and above their secular beliefs. I reject this position, not because I think that there (...)
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  10. John W. Cook (1988). Wittgenstein and Religious Belief: John W. Cook. Philosophy 63 (246):427-452.
    I find myself in profound disagreement with Wittgenstein's philosophy of religion and hence in disagreement also with those philosophers who have undertaken to elaborate and defend Wittgenstein's position. My principal objection is to the idea that religion is a language-game and that because of the kind of language-game it is, religious believers are not to be thought of as necessarily harbouring beliefs about the world over and above their secular beliefs. I reject this position, not because I think that there (...)
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  11. John W. Cook (1987). Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein. Religious Studies 23 (2):199 - 219.
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  12. John W. Cook (1987). Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein: JOHN W. COOK. Religious Studies 23 (2):199-219.
    In recent years there has been a tendency in some quarters to see an affinity between the views of Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein on the subject of religious belief. It seems to me that this is a mistake, that Kierkegaard's views were fundamentally at odds with Wittgenstein's. That this fact is not generally recognized is, I suspect, owing to the obscurity of Kierkegaard's most fundamental assumptions. My aim here is to make those assumptions explicit and to show how they differ from (...)
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  13. John W. Cook (1985). Discussion:Hanfling on Moore. Philosophical Investigations 8 (4):287-294.
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  14. John W. Cook (1985). The Metaphysics of Wittgenstein's On Certainty. Philosophical Investigations 8 (2):81-119.
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  15. John W. Cook (1983). Magic, Witchcraft, and Science. Philosophical Investigations 6 (1):2-36.
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  16. John W. Cook (1982). The Illusion of Aberrant Speakers. Philosophical Investigations 5 (3):215-266.
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  17. John W. Cook (1981). Malcolm's Misunderstandings. Philosophical Investigations 4 (2):72-90.
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  18. John W. Cook (1981). Reply to Henry le Roy Finch. Philosophical Investigations 4 (3):78-81.
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  19. John W. Cook (1980). Notes on Wittgenstein's on Certainty. Philosophical Investigations 3 (4):15-37.
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  20. John W. Cook (1980). The Fate of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Philosophical Investigations 3 (2):1-72.
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  21. John W. Cook (1979). A Reappraisal of Leibniz's Views on Space, Time, and Motion. Philosophical Investigations 2 (2):22-63.
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  22. John W. Cook (1978). Whorf's Linguistic Relativism. Philosophical Investigations 1 (1):1-30.
  23. John W. Cook (1972). Solipsism and Language. In Alice Ambrose & Morris Lazerowitz (eds.), Ludwig Wittgenstein: Philosophy and Language. George Allen and Unwin (London), Humanities Press (New York)
     
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  24. John W. Cook (1968). Hume's Scepticism with Regard to the Senses. American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (1):1 - 17.
  25. John W. Cook (1965). Wittgenstein on Privacy. Philosophical Review 74 (3):281-314.
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