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  1. John Wall (forthcoming). Book Review: Seeing Children, Seeing God: A Practical Theology of Children and Poverty. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (2):222-222.
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  2. John Wall (forthcoming). Book Review: When Children Became People: The Birth of Childhood in Early Christianity. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (3):338-340.
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  3. John Wall (2013). 2 All the World'sa Stage. In Emily Ryall (ed.), The Philosophy of Play. Routledge. 32.
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  4. John Wall (2010). Ethics in Light of Childhood. Georgetown University Press.
    Three enduring models -- What constitutes human being? -- What is the ethical aim? -- What is owed each other? -- Human rights in light of childhood -- The generative family -- The art of ethical thinking.
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  5. John Wall (ed.) (2007). Music, Metamorphosis and Capitalism: Self, Poetics and Politics. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
     
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  6. John Wall (2005). The Creative Imperative: Religious Ethics and the Formation of Life in Common. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):45 - 64.
    Challenging a long-standing assumption of the separation of ethical from poetic activity, this essay develops the basis for a theory of moral life as inherently and radically creative. A range of contemporary post-Kantian ethicists--including Ricoeur, Nussbaum, Kearney, and Gutiérrez--are employed to make the argument that moral practice requires a fundamental capability for creative transformation, imagination, and social renewal. In addition, this poetic moral capability can finally be understood only from the primordial religious point of view of the mystery of Creation (...)
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  7. John Wall (2005). Moral Creativity: Paul Ricoeur and the Poetics of Possibility. Oxford University Press.
    In Moral Creativity, John Wall argues that moral life and thought are inherently and radically creative. Human beings are called by their own primordially created depths to exceed historical evil and tragedy through the ongoing creative transformation of their world. This thesis challenges ancient Greek and biblical separations of ethics and poetic image-making, as well as contemporary conceptions of moral life as grounded in abstract principles or preconstituted traditions. Taking as his point of departure the poetics of the will of (...)
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  8. John Wall (2005). Phronesis as Poetic. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):313 - 331.
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  9. John Wall (2003). Phronesis, Poetics, and Moral Creativity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (3):317-341.
    At least since Aristotle, phronesis (practical wisdom) and poetics (making or creating) have been understood as essentially different activities, one moral the other (in itself) non-moral. Today, if anything, this distinction is sharpened by a Romantic association of poetics with inner subjective expression. Recent revivals of Aristotelian ethics sometimes allow for poetic dimensions of ethics, but these are still separated from practical wisdom per se. Through a fresh reading of phronesis in the French hermeneutical phenomenologist Paul Ricoeur, I argue that (...)
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  10. John Wall, William Schweiker & W. David Hall (eds.) (2002). Paul Ricoeur and Contemporary Moral Thought. Routledge.
    Here, some of the most influential thinkers in theological and philosophical ethics develop new directions for research in contemporary moral thought. Taking as their starting point Ricoeur's recent work on moral anthropology, the contributors set a vital agenda for future conversations about ethics and just community.
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  11. John Wall (2001). The Economy of the Gift: Paul Ricoeur's Significance for Theological Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):235 - 260.
    Paul Ricoeur's understanding of the relations of faith, love, and hope suggests a unique approach to theological ethics, one that holds fresh promise for bringing together considerations of the good (teleology) and the right (deontology) around the notion of an "economy of the gift." The economy of the gift articulates Ricoeur's distinctively dialectical understanding of the relation of the human and the divine, and the resulting dialectical moral relation of the self and the other. Despite our fallen condition, Ricoeur suggests, (...)
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