Search results for 'John William Burgess' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  3
    Glenn Burgess, Paul J. Cornish, Kate Langdon Forhan, E. J. Furcha, Stephen Lahey, John Christian Laursen, Cary J. Nederman, Gary Remer, William Walker & Simone Zurbuchen (eds.) (1996). Difference and Dissent: Theories of Toleration in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This innovative collection points to the need for a reevaluation of the origins of toleration theory. Philosophers, intellectual historians, and political theorists have assumed that the development of the theory of toleration has been a product of the modern world, and John Locke is usually regarded as the first theorist of toleration. The contributors to Difference and Dissent, however, discuss a range of conceptual positions that were employed by medieval and early modern thinkers to support a theory of toleration, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. John William Burgess (1978). Selections From Political Science and Comparative Constitutional Law. Distributed by Dabor Social Science Publications.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  10
    John William Burgess (1933). The Foundations of Political Science. New York, Columbia University Press.
    It has become, however, one of the commonest catchwords of modern political science. Especially is it so used and abused by French, English and American ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    John P. Burgess (2013). Kripke. Polity.
    In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained guide to all of Kripke’s published books and his most important philosophical papers, old and new.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. John P. Burgess (2013). Kripke. Polity.
    Saul Kripke has been a major influence on analytic philosophy and allied fields for a half-century and more. His early masterpiece, _Naming and Necessity_, reversed the pattern of two centuries of philosophizing about the necessary and the contingent. Although much of his work remains unpublished, several major essays have now appeared in print, most recently in his long-awaited collection _Philosophical Troubles_. In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. John P. Burgess (2012). Kripke. Polity.
    Saul Kripke has been a major influence on analytic philosophy and allied fields for a half-century and more. His early masterpiece, _Naming and Necessity_, reversed the pattern of two centuries of philosophizing about the necessary and the contingent. Although much of his work remains unpublished, several major essays have now appeared in print, most recently in his long-awaited collection _Philosophical Troubles_. In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. John P. Burgess (2012). Kripke. Polity.
    Saul Kripke has been a major influence on analytic philosophy and allied fields for a half-century and more. His early masterpiece, _Naming and Necessity_, reversed the pattern of two centuries of philosophizing about the necessary and the contingent. Although much of his work remains unpublished, several major essays have now appeared in print, most recently in his long-awaited collection _Philosophical Troubles_. In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. John P. Burgess (2013). Kripke. Polity.
    Saul Kripke has been a major influence on analytic philosophy and allied fields for a half-century and more. His early masterpiece, _Naming and Necessity_, reversed the pattern of two centuries of philosophizing about the necessary and the contingent. Although much of his work remains unpublished, several major essays have now appeared in print, most recently in his long-awaited collection _Philosophical Troubles_. In this book Kripke’s long-time colleague, the logician and philosopher John P. Burgess, offers a thorough and self-contained (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. John P. Burgess (2015). Rigor and Structure. OUP Oxford.
    John P. Burgess presents an illuminating study of the nature of mathematical rigor and of mathematical structure, and above all of the relation between them. He considers recent developments in the field including experimental mathematics and computerized formal proofs, and surveys many historical developments in mathematics, philosophy, and logic.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. John P. Burgess (2015). Rigor and Structure. Oxford University Press Uk.
    While we are commonly told that the distinctive method of mathematics is rigorous proof, and that the special topic of mathematics is abstract structure, there has been no agreement among mathematicians, logicians, or philosophers as to just what either of these assertions means. John P. Burgess clarifies the nature of mathematical rigor and of mathematical structure, and above all of the relation between the two, taking into account some of the latest developments in mathematics, including the rise of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. John P. Burgess (2008). Mathematics, Models, and Modality: Selected Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    John Burgess is the author of a rich and creative body of work which seeks to defend classical logic and mathematics through counter-criticism of their nominalist, intuitionist, relevantist, and other critics. This selection of his essays, which spans twenty-five years, addresses key topics including nominalism, neo-logicism, intuitionism, modal logic, analyticity, and translation. An introduction sets the essays in context and offers a retrospective appraisal of their aims. The volume will be of interest to a wide range of readers (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12. George S. Boolos, John P. Burgess & Richard C. Jeffrey (2005). Computability and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    This fourth edition of one of the classic logic textbooks has been thoroughly revised by John Burgess. The aim is to increase the pedagogical value of the book for the core market of students of philosophy and for students of mathematics and computer science as well. This book has become a classic because of its accessibility to students without a mathematical background, and because it covers not simply the staple topics of an intermediate logic course such as Godel's (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. George S. Boolos, John P. Burgess & Richard C. Jeffrey (2008). Computability and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Computability and Logic has become a classic because of its accessibility to students without a mathematical background and because it covers not simply the staple topics of an intermediate logic course, such as Godel's incompleteness theorems, but also a large number of optional topics, from Turing's theory of computability to Ramsey's theorem. This 2007 fifth edition has been thoroughly revised by John Burgess. Including a selection of exercises, adjusted for this edition, at the end of each chapter, it (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. George S. Boolos, John P. Burgess & Richard C. Jeffrey (2012). Computability and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Computability and Logic has become a classic because of its accessibility to students without a mathematical background and because it covers not simply the staple topics of an intermediate logic course, such as Godel's incompleteness theorems, but also a large number of optional topics, from Turing's theory of computability to Ramsey's theorem. This 2007 fifth edition has been thoroughly revised by John Burgess. Including a selection of exercises, adjusted for this edition, at the end of each chapter, it (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. George S. Boolos, John P. Burgess & Richard C. Jeffrey (2007). Computability and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    Computability and Logic has become a classic because of its accessibility to students without a mathematical background and because it covers not simply the staple topics of an intermediate logic course, such as Godel's incompleteness theorems, but also a large number of optional topics, from Turing's theory of computability to Ramsey's theorem. This 2007 fifth edition has been thoroughly revised by John Burgess. Including a selection of exercises, adjusted for this edition, at the end of each chapter, it (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. John P. Burgess (2009). Mathematics, Models, and Modality: Selected Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    John Burgess is the author of a rich and creative body of work which seeks to defend classical logic and mathematics through counter-criticism of their nominalist, intuitionist, relevantist, and other critics. This selection of his essays, which spans twenty-five years, addresses key topics including nominalism, neo-logicism, intuitionism, modal logic, analyticity, and translation. An introduction sets the essays in context and offers a retrospective appraisal of their aims. The volume will be of interest to a wide range of readers (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. John P. Burgess (2011). Mathematics, Models, and Modality: Selected Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    John Burgess is the author of a rich and creative body of work which seeks to defend classical logic and mathematics through counter-criticism of their nominalist, intuitionist, relevantist, and other critics. This selection of his essays, which spans twenty-five years, addresses key topics including nominalism, neo-logicism, intuitionism, modal logic, analyticity, and translation. An introduction sets the essays in context and offers a retrospective appraisal of their aims. The volume will be of interest to a wide range of readers (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. John P. Burgess (2012). Philosophical Logic. Princeton University Press.
    Philosophical Logic is a clear and concise critical survey of nonclassical logics of philosophical interest written by one of the world's leading authorities on the subject. After giving an overview of classical logic, John Burgess introduces five central branches of nonclassical logic, focusing on the sometimes problematic relationship between formal apparatus and intuitive motivation. Requiring minimal background and arranged to make the more technical material optional, the book offers a choice between an overview and in-depth study, and it (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Cohen Ga, If You’re an Egalitarian, Crocker Robert, Reason Religion, Crockett Clayton, DUPRÉ John & Human Nature (2002). CHARLES David and William Child (Eds): Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):325-330.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    Glyn S. Burgess (2002). John L. Grigsby, The “Gab” as a Latent Genre in Medieval French Literature: Drinking and Boasting in the Middle Ages.(Medieval Academy Books, 103.) Cambridge, Mass.: Medieval Academy of America, 2000. Pp. Ix, 255; Tables. $40 ($32 to Academy Members). [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):925-927.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  3
    Mark Colyvan Burgess, Anuj Dawar, Marcelo Fiore, Noam Greenberg & Hannes Leitgeb (2010). The Association for Symbolic Logic Publishes Analytical Reviews of Selected Books and Articles in the Field of Symbolic Logic. The Reviews Were Published in The Journal of Symbolic Logic From the Founding of the Journal in 1936 Until the End of 1999. The Association Moved the Reviews to This Bulletin, Beginning in 2000. The Reviews Section is Edited by Steve Awodey (Managing Editor), John Baldwin, John. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 16 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  8
    Alexis G. Burgess & John P. Burgess (2011). Truth. Princeton University Press.
    This is a concise, advanced introduction to current philosophical debates about truth. A blend of philosophical and technical material, the book is organized around, but not limited to, the tendency known as deflationism, according to which there is not much to say about the nature of truth. In clear language, Burgess and Burgess cover a wide range of issues, including the nature of truth, the status of truth-value gaps, the relationship between truth and meaning, relativism and pluralism about (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  23. John Burgess, Mending the Master.
    Fixing Frege is one of the most important investigations to date of Fregean approaches to the foundations of mathematics. In addition to providing an unrivalled survey of the technical program to which Frege’s writings have given rise, the book makes a large number of improvements and clarifications. Anyone with an interest in the philosophy of mathematics will enjoy and benefit from the careful and well informed overview provided by the first of its three chapters. Specialists will find the book an (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Seven. Kripke. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 102-115.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Three. Deflationism. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 33-51.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Two. Tarski. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 16-32.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Bibliography. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 143-152.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Contents. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Eight. Insolubility? In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 116-134.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Four. Indeterminacy. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 52-67.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Five. Realism. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 68-82.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter One. Introduction. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 1-15.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Chapter Six. Antirealism. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 83-101.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Further Reading. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press 135-142.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (2014). Preface. In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. John P. Burgess (2004). Mathematics and Bleak House. Philosophia Mathematica 12 (1):18-36.
    The form of nominalism known as 'mathematical fictionalism' is examined and found wanting, mainly on grounds that go back to an early antinominalist work of Rudolf Carnap that has unfortunately not been paid sufficient attention by more recent writers.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  37.  90
    John P. Burgess (2004). E Pluribus Unum: Plural Logic and Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 12 (3):193-221.
    A new axiomatization of set theory, to be called Bernays-Boolos set theory, is introduced. Its background logic is the plural logic of Boolos, and its only positive set-theoretic existence axiom is a reflection principle of Bernays. It is a very simple system of axioms sufficient to obtain the usual axioms of ZFC, plus some large cardinals, and to reduce every question of plural logic to a question of set theory.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  38.  56
    John P. Burgess (1986). The Truth is Never Simple. Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (3):663-681.
    The complexity of the set of truths of arithmetic is determined for various theories of truth deriving from Kripke and from Gupta and Herzberger.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  39. John P. Burgess (2004). Quine, Analyticity and Philosophy of Mathematics. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (214):38–55.
    Quine correctly argues that Carnap's distinction between internal and external questions rests on a distinction between analytic and synthetic, which Quine rejects. I argue that Quine needs something like Carnap's distinction to enable him to explain the obviousness of elementary mathematics, while at the same time continuing to maintain as he does that the ultimate ground for holding mathematics to be a body of truths lies in the contribution that mathematics makes to our overall scientific theory of the world. Quine's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40. John P. Burgess (2007). Against Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):427 - 439.
    This is the verbatim manuscript of a paper which has circulated underground for close to thirty years, reaching a metethical conclusion close to J. L. Mackie’s by a somewhat different route.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  46
    John P. Burgess (1979). Logic and Time. Journal of Symbolic Logic 44 (4):566-582.
  42.  87
    John Burgess (2010). Could a Zygote Be a Human Being? Bioethics 24 (2):61-70.
    This paper re-examines the question of whether quirks of early human foetal development tell against the view (conceptionism) that we are human beings at conception. A zygote is capable of splitting to give rise to identical twins. Since the zygote cannot be identical with either human being it will become, it cannot already be a human being. Parallel concerns can be raised about chimeras in which two embryos fuse. I argue first that there are just two ways of dealing with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  23
    John P. Burgess (1980). Decidability for Branching Time. Studia Logica 39 (2-3):203-218.
    The species of indeterminist tense logic called Peircean by A. N. Prior is proved to be recursively decidable.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  44.  1
    John A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia (1996). When Did You First Begin to Feel It? Locating the Beginnings of Human Consciousness? Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  45.  82
    John P. Burgess (2005). Translating Names. Analysis 65 (287):196–205.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. John Burgess (2010). On the Outside Looking in : A Caution About Conservativeness. In Kurt Gödel, Solomon Feferman, Charles Parsons & Stephen G. Simpson (eds.), Kurt Gödel: Essays for His Centennial. Association for Symbolic Logic
    My contribution to the symposium on Goedel’s philosophy of mathematics at the spring 2006 Association for Symbolic Logic meeting in Montreal. Provisional version: references remain to be added. To appear in an ASL volume of proceedings of the Goedel sessions at that meeting.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  65
    John P. Burgess (2003). Which Modal Models Are the Right Ones (for Logical Necessity)? Theoria 18 (2):145-158.
    Recently it has become almost the received wisdom in certain quarters that Kripke models are appropriate only for something like metaphysical modalities, and not for logical modalities. Here the line of thought leading to Kripke models, and reasons why they are no less appropriate for logical than for other modalities, are explained. It is also indicated where the fallacy in the argument leading to the contrary conclusion lies. The lessons learned are then applied to the question of the status of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  29
    John P. Burgess (1984). Synthetic Mechanics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 13 (4):379 - 395.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  49.  27
    John P. Burgess (2008). Thomas McKay. Plural Predication. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (1):133-140.
    This work, the first book-length study of its topic, is an important contribution to the literature of philosophical logic and philosophy of language, with implications for other branches of philosophy, including philosophy of mathematics. However, five of the book's ten chapters , including many of the author's most original contributions, are devoted to issues about natural language, and lie pretty well outside the scope of this journal, not to mention that of the reviewer's competence. For this reason I will here (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  66
    John P. Burgess (2000). Critical Studies / Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 8 (1):84-91.
1 — 50 / 1000