Search results for 'John William Burgess' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John William Burgess (1933). The Foundations of Political Science. New York, Columbia University Press.score: 870.0
    It has become, however, one of the commonest catchwords of modern political science. Especially is it so used and abused by French, English and American ...
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  2. John William Burgess (1978). Selections From Political Science and Comparative Constitutional Law. Distributed by Dabor Social Science Publications.score: 870.0
     
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  3. Glenn Burgess, Paul J. Cornish, Kate Langdon Forhan, E. J. Furcha, Stephen Lahey, John Christian Laursen, Cary J. Nederman, Gary Remer, William Walker & Simone Zurbuchen (1996). Difference and Dissent: Theories of Toleration in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 810.0
  4. Mark Nelson, Tony L. Burgess, Abigail Alling, Norberto Alvarez-Romo, William F. Dempster, Roy L. Walford & John P. Allen (1993). Using a Closed Ecological System to Study Earth's Biosphere. Bioscience 43 (4):225-236.score: 810.0
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  5. Mark Colyvan Burgess, Anuj Dawar, Marcelo Fiore, Noam Greenberg & Hannes Leitgeb (2010). The Association for Symbolic Logic Publishes Analytical Reviews of Selected Books and Articles in the Field of Symbolic Logic. The Reviews Were Published in The Journal of Symbolic Logic From the Founding of the Journal in 1936 Until the End of 1999. The Association Moved the Reviews to This Bulletin, Beginning in 2000. The Reviews Section is Edited by Steve Awodey (Managing Editor), John Baldwin, John. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 16 (1).score: 360.0
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  6. Glyn S. Burgess (2002). John L. Grigsby, The “Gab” as a Latent Genre in Medieval French Literature: Drinking and Boasting in the Middle Ages.(Medieval Academy Books, 103.) Cambridge, Mass.: Medieval Academy of America, 2000. Pp. Ix, 255; Tables. $40 ($32 to Academy Members). [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):925-927.score: 360.0
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  7. Cohen Ga, If You’re an Egalitarian, Crocker Robert, Reason Religion, Crockett Clayton, DUPRÉ John & Human Nature (2002). CHARLES David and William Child (Eds): Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):325-330.score: 360.0
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  8. John Burgess, Mending the Master.score: 300.0
    Fixing Frege is one of the most important investigations to date of Fregean approaches to the foundations of mathematics. In addition to providing an unrivalled survey of the technical program to which Frege’s writings have given rise, the book makes a large number of improvements and clarifications. Anyone with an interest in the philosophy of mathematics will enjoy and benefit from the careful and well informed overview provided by the first of its three chapters. Specialists will find the book an (...)
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  9. John P. Burgess (2007). Against Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):427 - 439.score: 240.0
    This is the verbatim manuscript of a paper which has circulated underground for close to thirty years, reaching a metethical conclusion close to J. L. Mackie’s by a somewhat different route.
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  10. John P. Burgess & Gideon A. Rosen (1997). A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Numbers and other mathematical objects are exceptional in having no locations in space or time or relations of cause and effect. This makes it difficult to account for the possibility of the knowledge of such objects, leading many philosophers to embrace nominalism, the doctrine that there are no such objects, and to embark on ambitious projects for interpreting mathematics so as to preserve the subject while eliminating its objects. This book cuts through a host of technicalities that have obscured previous (...)
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  11. John P. Burgess (2004). Mathematics and Bleak House. Philosophia Mathematica 12 (1):18-36.score: 240.0
    The form of nominalism known as 'mathematical fictionalism' is examined and found wanting, mainly on grounds that go back to an early antinominalist work of Rudolf Carnap that has unfortunately not been paid sufficient attention by more recent writers.
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  12. John P. Burgess (2004). Quine, Analyticity and Philosophy of Mathematics. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (214):38–55.score: 240.0
    Quine correctly argues that Carnap's distinction between internal and external questions rests on a distinction between analytic and synthetic, which Quine rejects. I argue that Quine needs something like Carnap's distinction to enable him to explain the obviousness of elementary mathematics, while at the same time continuing to maintain as he does that the ultimate ground for holding mathematics to be a body of truths lies in the contribution that mathematics makes to our overall scientific theory of the world. Quine's (...)
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  13. John P. Burgess (2004). E Pluribus Unum: Plural Logic and Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 12 (3):193-221.score: 240.0
    A new axiomatization of set theory, to be called Bernays-Boolos set theory, is introduced. Its background logic is the plural logic of Boolos, and its only positive set-theoretic existence axiom is a reflection principle of Bernays. It is a very simple system of axioms sufficient to obtain the usual axioms of ZFC, plus some large cardinals, and to reduce every question of plural logic to a question of set theory.
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  14. John Burgess (2010). Could a Zygote Be a Human Being? Bioethics 24 (2):61-70.score: 240.0
    This paper re-examines the question of whether quirks of early human foetal development tell against the view (conceptionism) that we are human beings at conception. A zygote is capable of splitting to give rise to identical twins. Since the zygote cannot be identical with either human being it will become, it cannot already be a human being. Parallel concerns can be raised about chimeras in which two embryos fuse. I argue first that there are just two ways of dealing with (...)
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  15. John P. Burgess (2008). Charles Parsons. Mathematical Thought and its Objects. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (3):402-409.score: 240.0
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  16. John Burgess, Tarski's Tort.score: 240.0
    A revision of a sermon on the evils of calling model theory “semantics”, preached at Notre Dame on Saint Patrick’s Day, 2005. Provisional version: references remain to be added. To appear in Mathematics, Modality, and Models: Selected Philosophical Papers, coming from Cambridge University Press.
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  17. John P. Burgess (2008). 3. Cats, Dogs, and so On. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 4--56.score: 240.0
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  18. John A. Burgess (1998). Error Theories and Values. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (4):534 – 552.score: 240.0
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  19. John P. Burgess (1986). The Truth is Never Simple. Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (3):663-681.score: 240.0
    The complexity of the set of truths of arithmetic is determined for various theories of truth deriving from Kripke and from Gupta and Herzberger.
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  20. John P. Burgess (2005). Charles S. Chihara. A Structural Account of Mathematics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Pp. XIV + 380. ISBN 0-19-926753-. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):78-90.score: 240.0
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  21. John P. Burgess (1996). Marcus, Kripke, and Names. Philosophical Studies 84 (1):1 - 47.score: 240.0
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  22. John P. Burgess (2008). Thomas McKay. Plural Predication. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (1):133-140.score: 240.0
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  23. John Burgess (2010). On the Outside Looking in : A Caution About Conservativeness. In Kurt Gödel, Solomon Feferman, Charles Parsons & Stephen G. Simpson (eds.), Kurt Gödel: Essays for His Centennial. Association for Symbolic Logic.score: 240.0
    My contribution to the symposium on Goedel’s philosophy of mathematics at the spring 2006 Association for Symbolic Logic meeting in Montreal. Provisional version: references remain to be added. To appear in an ASL volume of proceedings of the Goedel sessions at that meeting.
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  24. John P. Burgess (2005). Translating Names. Analysis 65 (287):196–205.score: 240.0
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  25. John P. Burgess (1993). Hintikka Et Sandu Versus Frege in Re Arbitrary Functions. Philosophia Mathematica 1 (1):50-65.score: 240.0
    Hintikka and Sandu have recently claimed that Frege's notion of function was substantially narrower than that prevailing in real analysis today. In the present note, their textual evidence for this claim is examined in the light of relevant historical and biographical background and judged insufficient.
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  26. John P. Burgess (1979). Logic and Time. Journal of Symbolic Logic 44 (4):566-582.score: 240.0
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  27. John A. Burgess (1990). Phenomenal Qualities and the Nontransitivity of Matching. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (2):206-220.score: 240.0
  28. John P. Burgess (1969). Probability Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 34 (2):264-274.score: 240.0
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  29. John Burgess, Logicism: A New Look.score: 240.0
    Adapated from talks at the UCLA Logic Center and the Pitt Philosophy of Science Series. Exposition of material from Fixing Frege, Chapter 2 (on predicative versions of Frege’s system) and from “Protocol Sentences for Lite Logicism” (on a form of mathematical instrumentalism), suggesting a connection. Provisional version: references remain to be added. To appear in Mathematics, Modality, and Models: Selected Philosophical Papers, coming from Cambridge University Press.
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  30. John P. Burgess (2003). Which Modal Models Are the Right Ones (for Logical Necessity)? Theoria 18 (2):145-158.score: 240.0
    Recently it has become almost the received wisdom in certain quarters that Kripke models are appropriate only for something like metaphysical modalities, and not for logical modalities. Here the line of thought leading to Kripke models, and reasons why they are no less appropriate for logical than for other modalities, are explained. It is also indicated where the fallacy in the argument leading to the contrary conclusion lies. The lessons learned are then applied to the question of the status of (...)
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  31. John P. Burgess (2006). Discussion: Soames on Empiricism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 129 (3):619 - 626.score: 240.0
    Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century by Scott Soames reminds me of nothing so much as Lectures on Literature by Vladimir Nabokov. Both are works that arose immediately out of the needs of undergraduate teaching, yet each manages to say much of significance to knowledgeable professionals. Each indirectly provides an outline of the history of its field, through a presentation of selected major works, taken in chronological order and including items that are generally recognized as marking decisive turning points. Yet (...)
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  32. John P. Burgess (1984). Synthetic Mechanics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 13 (4):379 - 395.score: 240.0
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  33. John P. Burgess (1984). Beyond Tense Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 13 (3):235-248.score: 240.0
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  34. John Burgess, Review of Charles Parsons: Mathematical Thought and its Objects. [REVIEW]score: 240.0
    This long-awaited volume is a must-read for anyone with a serious interest in\nphilosophy of mathematics. The book falls into two parts, with the primary focus of\nthe first on ontology and structuralism, and the second on intuition and\nepistemology, though with many links between them. The style throughout involves\nunhurried examination from several points of view of each issue addressed, before\nreaching a guarded conclusion. A wealth of material is set before the reader along\nthe way, but a reviewer wishing to summarize the author’s views (...)
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  35. John P. Burgess (1980). Decidability for Branching Time. Studia Logica 39 (2-3):203 - 218.score: 240.0
    The species of indeterminist tense logic called Peircean by A. N. Prior is proved to be recursively decidable.
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  36. John P. Burgess (1988). Addendum to "the Truth is Never Simple". Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (2):390-392.score: 240.0
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  37. John P. Burgess (1991). Synthetic Mechanics Revisited. Journal of Philosophical Logic 20 (2):121 - 130.score: 240.0
    Earlier results on eliminating numerical objects from physical theories are extended to results on eliminating geometrical objects.
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  38. John P. Burgess (2000). Critical Studies / Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 8 (1):84-91.score: 240.0
  39. John P. Burgess (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 1 (2):637-639.score: 240.0
  40. John P. Burgess (1978). On the Hanf Number of Souslin Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (3):568-571.score: 240.0
    We show it is consistent with ZFC that the Hanf number of Ellentuck's Souslin logic should be exactly $\beth_{\omega_2}$.
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  41. John A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia (1996). When Did You First Begin to Feel It? Locating the Beginnings of Human Consciousness? Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.score: 240.0
  42. Klaus Hentschel (2002). Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays. Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.score: 224.0
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a (...)
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  43. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2014). Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 192.0
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr. ... Vivarium 32 (1994): 62–71. te Velde, Rude A. “Natura in se ipsa recurva est: Duns Scotus and Aquinas on the Relationship between Nature and Will.” In John Duns Scotus: ... “William of Ockham's Theological Ethics .
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  44. Ari Sutinen (2013). Two Project Methods: Preliminary Observations on the Similarities and Differences Between William Heard Kilpatrick's Project Method and John Dewey's Problem-Solving Method. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):1040-1053.score: 168.0
  45. Maurice Baum (1928). A Comparative Study of the Philosophies of William James and John Dewey. Thesis: University of Chicago.score: 168.0
  46. Vincent Michael Colapietro (2003). Fateful Shapes of Human Freedom: John William Miller and the Crises of Modernity. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 168.0
    John William Miller's radical revision of the idealistic tradition anticipated some of the most important developments in contemporary thought. In this study, Vincent Colapietro situates Miller's powerful but neglected corpus not only in reference to Continental European philosophy but also to paradigmatic figures in American culture like Lincoln, Emerson, Thoreau, and James.
     
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  47. Susan Sheets-Pyenson (2006). Horse Race: John William Dawson, Charles Lyell, and the Competition Over the Edinburgh Natural History Chair in 1854–1855. Annals of Science 49 (5):461-477.score: 168.0
    (1992). Horse race: John William Dawson, Charles Lyell, and the competition over the Edinburgh natural history chair in 1854–1855. Annals of Science: Vol. 49, No. 5, pp. 461-477.
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  48. John P. Burgess (2011). The Development of Modern Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (2):187 - 191.score: 160.0
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 32, Issue 2, Page 187-191, May 2011.
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  49. John P. Burgess, Friedman and the Axiomatization of Kripke's Theory of Truth.score: 160.0
    What is the simplest and most natural axiomatic replacement for the set-theoretic definition of the minimal fixed point on the Kleene scheme in Kripke’s theory of truth? What is the simplest and most natural set of axioms and rules for truth whose adoption by a subject who had never heard the word "true" before would give that subject an understanding of truth for which the minimal fixed point on the Kleene scheme would be a good model? Several axiomatic systems, old (...)
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  50. George Boolos, John Burgess, Richard P. & C. Jeffrey (2007). Computability and Logic. Cambridge University Press.score: 160.0
    Computability and Logic has become a classic because of its accessibility to students without a mathematical background and because it covers not simply the staple topics of an intermediate logic course, such as Godel’s incompleteness theorems, but also a large number of optional topics, from Turing’s theory of computability to Ramsey’s theorem. Including a selection of exercises, adjusted for this edition, at the end of each chapter, it offers a new and simpler treatment of the representability of recursive functions, a (...)
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