Search results for 'Johnson Petta' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nicholas F. Gier & Johnson Petta (2007). Hebrew and Buddhist Selves: A Constructive Postmodern Study. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):47 – 64.score: 120.0
    Our task will be to demonstrate that there are instructive parallels between Hebrew and Buddhist concepts of self. There are at least five main constituents (skandhas in Sanskrit) of the Hebrew self: (1) nepe as living being; (2) rah as indwelling spirit; (3) lb as heart-mind; (4) bāār as flesh; and (5) dām as blood. We will compare these with the five Buddhist skandhas: disposition (samskāra), consciousness (vijñāna), feeling (vedanā), perception (samjñā), and body (rpa). Generally, what we will discover is (...)
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  2. James Turner Johnson (2000). Comment by James Turner Johnson. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):331-335.score: 120.0
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  3. Paul Johnson (2009). Paul Johnson Wonders Whether Darwin Would Have Put Atheist Slogans on Buses. The Chesterton Review 35 (1-2):284-288.score: 120.0
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  4. Samuel Johnson (2003). Samuel Johnson on Ireland. The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):254-256.score: 120.0
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  5. Alexander Bryan Johnson (1947). Alexander Bryan Johnson's a Treatise on Language, Ed. Berkeley, Univ. Of California Press.score: 120.0
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  6. Summer Johnson (2007). A Rebuttal to Dzur and Levin: Johnson on the Legitimacy and Authority of Bioethics Commissions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):143.score: 120.0
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  7. Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, Second Edition by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.score: 120.0
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  8. Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.score: 120.0
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  9. David K. Johnson (1991). Endnotes for Johnson, From Page 8. Inquiry 8 (4):27-27.score: 120.0
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  10. David M. Johnson (2013). M. Johnson, H. Tarrant (Edd.) Alcibiades and the Socratic Lover-Educator. Pp. X + 254, Figs. London: Bristol Classical Press, 2012. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-7156-4086-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):58-60.score: 120.0
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  11. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and genetics. (...)'s book shows also how Aristotle's theory has profound implications for environmental ethics and for the theory of value in general. (shrink)
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  12. Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his (...)
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  13. Thomas Johnson (ed.) (2011). Enhancing Human Capacities. [REVIEW]score: 60.0
    Review of Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen and Guy Kahane eds., Enhancing Human Capacities Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s12152-011-9148-y Authors Thomas Johnson, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia Journal Neuroethics Online ISSN 1874-5504 Print ISSN 1874-5490.
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  14. Julian Johnson (2002). Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    During the last few decades, most cultural critics have come to agree that the division between "high" and "low" art is an artificial one, that Beethoven's Ninth and "Blue Suede Shoes" are equally valuable as cultural texts. In Who Needs Classical Music?, Julian Johnson challenges these assumptions about the relativism of cultural judgements. The author maintains that music is more than just "a matter of taste": while some music provides entertainment, or serves as background noise, other music claims to (...)
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  15. Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). Focusing on Truth. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Focusing on Truth explores the question of what truth is, balancing historical with issue-orientated discussion. The book offers a comprehensive survey of all the major theories of truth. Lawrence Johnson investigates a number of closely related matters of truth in his inquiry, such as: What sorts of things are true or false? What is attributed to them when they are said to be true or false? What do facts have to do with truth? What can we learn from previous (...)
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  16. Mark Johnson (1993). Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors (...)
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  17. Allan G. Johnson (1997). The Forest and the Trees: Sociology as Life, Practice, and Promise. Temple University Press.score: 60.0
    Johnson takes us into every nook and cranny of social life, from the meaning of "I love you" to the ravages of social oppression.
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  18. David Johnson (1999). Hume, Holism, and Miracles. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
    David Johnson seeks to overthrow one of the widely accepted tenets of Anglo-American philosophy -- that of the success of the Humean case against the rational ...
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  19. George Johnson, On the Trail of the Illuminati: A Journalist's Search for the “Conspiracy That Rules the World".score: 60.0
    Many readers encounter the history and mythology of the Illuminati for the first time in the course of reading Angels & Demons. They typically wonder if the Illuminati is a real organization in history and, if so, how much of Dan Brown’s description is accurate. To help answer that question, we turned to George Johnson, the well-known New York Times science writer. Johnson shares several interests with Dan Brown and fans of Angels & Demons: He has written extensively (...)
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  20. Christopher Johnson (1993). System and Writing in the Philosophy of Jacques Derrida. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This is an important new critical analysis of Derrida's theory of writing, based on close readings of key texts. It reveals a dimension of Derrida's thinking that has been neglected in favor of those "deconstructionist" cliches favored by much recent literary criticism. Christopher Johnson highlights the special character of Derrida's philosophy that comes from his contact with contemporary natural science and with systems theory. This study casts new light on an exacting set of intellectual issues facing philosophy and critical (...)
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  21. Peter Johnson (1988). Politics, Innocence, and the Limits of Goodness. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The place of moral innocence in politics is the central theme of Peter Johnson's subtle and original book.
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  22. Mark Johnson (2014). Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding From the Perspective of Cognitive Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a pragmatist philosophical framework in Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science, Mark Johnson argues that appealing solely to absolute principles and values is not only scientifically unsound but even morally (...)
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  23. Barbara Johnson (2008). Persons and Things. Harvard University Press.score: 60.0
    Moving effortlessly between symbolist poetry and Barbie dolls, artificial intelligence and Kleist, Kant, and Winnicott, Barbara Johnson not only clarifies ...
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  24. Robert N. Johnson (2011). Self-Improvement: An Essay in Kantian Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Is there any moral obligation to improve oneself, to foster and develop various capacities in oneself? From a broadly Kantian point of view, Self-Improvement defends the view that there is such an obligation and that it is an obligation that each person owes to him or herself. The defence addresses a range of arguments philosophers have mobilized against this idea, including the argument that it is impossible to owe anything to yourself, and the view that an obligation to improve onself (...)
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  25. Ralph H. Johnson (2012). When Informal Logic Met Critical Thinking. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (3):5-14.score: 60.0
    In this reflection piece, Ralph Johnson provides an account of the development of informal logic and how it intersected with the Critical Thinking Movement. Section I is an account of the origins of what Johnson calls the “Informal Logic Initiative.” Section II discusses how the Informal Logic Initiative connected with the Critical Thinking Movement at the Sonoma State University Conferences starting in 1981. Section III discusses the relationship between logic and critical thinking. Section IV describes “The Network Problem,” (...)
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  26. Gregory R. Johnson & Chris Matthew Sciabarra (2001). Ayn Rand in the Scholarly Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 3 (1):165 - 169.score: 60.0
    Gregory R. Johnson and Chris Matthew Sciabarra discuss references to Ayn Rand in the works of Paul Feyerabend and Slovaj Žižek.
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  27. Gregory R. Johnson & David Rasmussen (2001). Rejoinder to Machan and Tabarrok: Rand on Abortion, Revisited. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (2):469 - 485.score: 60.0
    Gregory R. Johnson and David Rasmussen defend their critique of Ayn Rand's views on abortion, arguing that their critics miss its main points. Tibor Machan and Alexander Tabarrok actually depart from Rand's own position under the guise of defending it; they introduce a non-Randian distinction between being a human organism and being a moral person.
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  28. David Johnson (2004). Truth Without Paradox. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 60.0
    In Truth Without Paradox, David Johnson purports to solve several of the traditional problems of metaphysics, pertaining to truth, logic, similitude, morality, and God.
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  29. Brian M. D. Johnson (2011). Psychoanalytic Treatment of Psychological Addiction to Alcohol (Alcohol Abuse). Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 60.0
    The DSM-V Committee plans to abolish the distinction between Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence (DSM5.org). The author presents a case report as a proof of concept that this distinction should be retained. The author has asserted that Alcohol Abuse is a purely psychological addiction, while Alcohol Dependence involves capture of the ventral tegmental dopaminergic SEEKING system (Johnson 2003). In psychological addiction the brain can be assumed to function normally, and ordinary psychoanalytic technique can be followed. For the patient described, (...)
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  30. Gregory R. Johnson (1999). Liberty and Nature: The Missing Link. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 1 (1):135 - 166.score: 60.0
    GREGORY R. JOHNSON examines the link between Ayn Rand's ethics, which can be broadly characterized as Aristotelian, and her political philosophy, which can be broadly characterized as classical liberalism of the Lockean, natural rights variety. He maintains that Rand's argument for classical liberalism on the basis of the objectivity of values fails because of a reductionistic and excessively intellectualistic conception of human nature. In addition to discussing Rand's arguments, he surveys the Rand-influenced work of Douglas B. Rasmussen and Douglas (...)
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  31. Gregory R. Johnson & David Rasmussen (2000). Rand on Abortion: A Critique. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 1 (2):245 - 261.score: 60.0
    GREGORY R. JOHNSON and DAVID RASMUSSEN argue that Rand's defense of abortion on demand is inconsistent with her own fundamental metaphysical, epistemological, and moral principles, namely that everything that exists has a determinate identity, that the concept of man refers to all of man's characteristics, not just his essential characteristics, and that there is no gap between what an organism truly is and what it ought to be.
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  32. Clarence Sholé Johnson (2003). Cornel West & Philosophy: The Quest for Social Justice. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Cornel West's reputation as a public and celebrity intellectual has overshadowed his important contributions to philosophy. Professor Clarence Shole Johnson provides a rectification of this situation in this benchmark, thought-provoking book. After a brief biographical sketch, Johnson leads us through a comprehensive examination of West's philosophy from his conceptions of pragmatism, existentialism, Marxism, and Prophetic Christianity to his persuasive writings on black-Jewish relations, affirmative action, and the role of black intellectuals. Special focus is given to West's writings on (...)
     
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  33. Aaron P. Johnson (2006). Ethnicity and Argument in Eusebius' Praeparatio Evangelica. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Eusebius' magisterial Praeparatio Evangelica (written sometime between AD 313 and 324) offers an apologetic defence of Christianity in the face of Greek accusations of irrationality and impiety. Though brimming with the quotations of other (often lost) Greek authors, the work is dominated by a clear and sustained argument. Against the tendency to see the Praeparatio as merely an anthology of other sources or a defence of monotheistic religion against paganism, Aaron P. Johnson seeks to appreciate Eusebius' contribution to the (...)
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  34. Phillip E. Johnson (2005). Intelligent Design in Biology: The Current Situation and Future Prospects. Think 4 (11):17-26.score: 60.0
    Phillip Johnson introduces the debate over intelligent design.
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  35. Elizabeth A. Johnson (2007/2011). Quest for the Living God: Mapping Frontiers in the Theology of God. Continuum.score: 60.0
    'Since the middle of the twentieth century,' writes Elizabeth Johnson, 'there has been a renaissance of new insights into God in the Christian tradition. On different continents, under pressure from historical events and social conditions, people of faith have glimpsed the living God in fresh ways. It is not that a wholly different God is discovered from the One believed in by previous generations. Christian faith does not believe in a new God but, finding itself in new situations, seeks (...)
     
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  36. Gregory R. Johnson (2000). Rejoinder to Thomas and Vacker: Ayn Rand and the Mastery of Nature. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (1):229 - 240.score: 60.0
    Gregory R. Johnson argues, contra Barry Vacker, that reductionist thinking and nonlinear aesthetics are not mutually exclusive, and that the passages in The Fountainhead cited by Vacker actually support the mastery of nature thesis. Johnson also addresses some miscellaneous criticisms offered by William Thomas, who wrote a review of Johnson's "Liberty and Nature" (Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Fall 1999) that appeared in Navigator.
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  37. D. Barton Johnson (2000). Strange Bedfellows: Ayn Rand and Vladimir Nabokov. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (1):47 - 67.score: 60.0
    D. Barton Johnson traces the parallel lives and literary origins of two Russo-American writers: Ayn Rand and Vladimir Nabokov. Born in Saint Peterburg six years apart, they overlapped on the New York Times bestsellers list in the late fifties. While Nabokov's Russian cultural roots have been much explored, Rand's were little realized prior to Chris Matthew Sciabarra's investigation of her Russian philosophical context. Nabokov and Rand represent polar examples of their cultural heritage: for Nabokov, the aesthetically-oriented tradition of the (...)
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  38. W. Brad Johnson (2008). The Elements of Ethics: For Professionals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style , this handy reference concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the delicate balance of professional ethics. Johnson and Ridley reduce the wealth of published material on the topic to the seventy-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore questions of integrity, loyalty, justice, respect, and delivering one's best in the business environment. Succinct and comprehensive, this is a must-have for any professional or business (...)
     
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  39. A. G. Johnson (1983). Teaching Medical Ethics as a Practical Subject: Observations From Experience. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):5-7.score: 60.0
    The author, head of a teaching hospital surgical unit, argues that the medical curriculum must ensure that all students are exposed to a minimum of ethical discussion and decision-making. In describing his own approach he emphasises the need to show students that it is 'an intensely practical subject'. Moreover, he reminds them that moral dilemmas in medicine--perhaps a better term than medical ethics--are unavoidable in clinical practice. Professor Johnson emphasises the need for small group teaching and discussion of real (...)
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  40. Peter Johnson (1999). The Philosophy of Manners: A Study of the 'Little Virtues'. Thoemmes.score: 60.0
    In The Philosophy of Manners Peter Johnson makes a compelling case for manners as a subject for investigation by modern moral philosophy. He examines manners as 'little virtues', explaining their distinctive conceptual characteristics and charting their intricate detail and relationships with each other. In demonstrating why manners are important to our mutual expectations, Johnson reveals a terrain which modern moral philosophy has left largely unmapped. Through a critical examination of the ethics of John Rawls and Alasdair MacIntyre, (...) shows how the nature of manners constitutes a philosophical problem both for liberalism and its critics. Taking the recent revival of virtue ethics as its broad starting point, The Philosophy of Manners discusses the 'little virtues' as they are treated in the Aristotelian and Kantian traditions of writing on ethics. Original features of the book include discussions of nameless virtues, the logical intricacy of the 'little virtues' which compose manners, and the nature of their orchestration by the more substantial virtues and moral concerns. The aim throughout is to give manners a philosophically defensible place in the moral life - a place which neither inflates nor understates their importance. --an examination of why manners are essential to moral literacy and an ethical society --the first work of its kind - no other ethical investigation concentrates on manners --relevant to the recent revival of interest in virtue ethics and any course in contemporary ethics --will provoke argument and disagreement. (shrink)
     
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  41. P. A. Minkus, J. A. Blair & R. H. Johnson (1980). Arguments That Aren't Arguments. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium, Ed. Ja Blair and Rh Johnson 69:76.score: 60.0
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  42. Jeffery L. Johnson (1994). Procedure, Substance, and the Divine Command Theory. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (1):39 - 55.score: 30.0
    Natural theology is still practiced as though substantive theological conclusions can be derived by a quasi-deductive process. Perhaps relevant "evidence" may lead to interesting theological conclusions -- the fact of natural evil, or the cosmic fine-tuning we hear about in contemporary cosmology, both cry out for theological explanation. I remain a skeptic, however, about the value of "a priori" methods in natural theology. The case study in this short discussion is the well known attempt to establish the logical incoherence of (...)
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  43. George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1980). Conceptual Metaphor in Everyday Language. Journal of Philosophy 77 (8):453-486.score: 30.0
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  44. Kent Johnson (2007). An Overview of Lexical Semantics. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):119-134.score: 30.0
    This article reviews some linguistic and philosophical work in lexical semantics. In Section 1, the general methods of lexical semantics are explored, with particular attention to how semantic features of verbs are associated with grammatical patterns. In Section 2, philosophical consequences and issues arising from this sort of research is reviewed.
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  45. David Johnson & Shalom Lappin (1997). A Critique of the Minimalist Program. Linguistics and Philosophy 20 (3):273-333.score: 30.0
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  46. Robert N. Johnson (2003). Virtue and Right. Ethics 113 (4):810-834.score: 30.0
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  47. John Lincourt & Robert Johnson (2004). Ethics Training: A Genuine Dilemma for Engineering Educators. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):353-358.score: 30.0
    This is an examination of three main strategies used by engineering educators to integrate ethics into the engineering curriculum. They are: (1) the standalone course, (2) the ethics imperative mandating ethics content for all engineering courses, and (3) outsourcing ethics instruction to an external expert. The expectations from each approach are discussed and their main limitations described. These limitations include the insular status of the stand-alone course, the diffuse and uneven integration with the ethics imperative, and the orphaned status of (...)
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  48. Robert Johnson (2009). Good Will and the Moral Worth of Acting From Duty. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    The first section of the Groundwork begins “It is impossible to imagine anything at all in the world, or even beyond it, that can be called good without qualification— except a good will.”1 Kant’s explanation and defense of this claim is followed by an explanation and defense of another related claim, that only actions performed out of duty have moral worth. He explains that actions performed out of duty are those done from respect for the moral law, and then culminates (...)
     
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  49. James Johnson (1996). How Not to Criticize Rational Choice Theory: Pathologies of "Common Sense". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (1):77-91.score: 30.0
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  50. Kent Johnson (2004). On the Systematicity of the Language of Thought. Journal of Philosophy 101 (3):111-139.score: 30.0
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