Disambiguations:
Mark Johnson [65]Marcia K. Johnson [35]Mark H. Johnson [30]Monte Ransome Johnson [16]
Mark L. Johnson [15]Matthew Johnson [12]M. Johnson [10]Martin Johnson [9]

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Profile: Mark Johnson (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
Profile: Mark Johnson (East Carolina University)
Profile: Martin Johnson
Profile: Michael Knowlton Johnson
Profile: Matthew Johnson (Iowa State University)
Profile: Michael Johnson (Berea College)
Profile: Michael Johnson (University of Chicago, Concordia College)
Profile: Michael F. Johnson
Profile: Monte Ransome Johnson (University of California, San Diego)
Profile: Michael Alan Johnson (Georgia State University)
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  1. George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1999). Philosophy in the Flesh the Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought.
  2.  23
    Mark L. Johnson (1987). The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason. University of Chicago Press.
    "There are books—few and far between—which carefully, delightfully, and genuinely turn your head inside out. This is one of them. It ranges over some central issues in Western philosophy and begins the long overdue job of giving us a radically new account of meaning, rationality, and objectivity."—Yaakov Garb, _San Francisco Chronicle_.
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  3.  58
    Mark Johnson (1993). Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. University of Chicago Press.
    Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors We Live (...)
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  4.  15
    Doohwan Ahn, Sanda Badescu, Giorgio Baruchello, Raj Nath Bhat, Laura Boileau, Rosalind Carey, Camelia-Mihaela Cmeciu, Alan Goldstone, James Grieve, John Grumley, Grant Havers, Stefan Höjelid, Peter Isackson, Marguerite Johnson, Adrienne Kertzer, J.-Guy Lalande, Clinton R. Long, Joseph Mali, Ben Marsden, Peter Monteath, Michael Edward Moore, Jeff Noonan, Lynda Payne, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Brayton Polka, Lily Polliack, John Preston, Anthony Pym, Marina Ritzarev, Joseph Rouse, Peter N. Saeta, Arthur B. Shostak, Stanley Shostak, Marcia Landy, Kenneth R. Stunkel, I. I. I. Wheeler & Phillip H. Wiebe (2009). Null. The European Legacy 14 (6):731-771.
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  5.  81
    Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his pioneering (...)
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  6.  43
    Atsushi Senju & Mark H. Johnson (2009). The Eye Contact Effect: Mechanisms and Development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):127-134.
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  7. Marcia K. Johnson (1991). Reality Monitoring: Evidence From Confabulation in Organic Brain Disease Patients. In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press 176--197.
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  8. Denis Mareschal, Mark H. Johnson, Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas & Gert Westermann (2007). Neuroconstructivism - I: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? Neuroconstructivism is a pioneering 2 volume work that sets out a whole new framework for considering the complex topic of development, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging.
     
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  9.  14
    Sharon Goldwater, Thomas L. Griffiths & Mark Johnson (2009). A Bayesian Framework for Word Segmentation: Exploring the Effects of Context. Cognition 112 (1):21-54.
  10. Marcia K. Johnson & Carol L. Raye (2000). Cognitive and Brain Mechanisms of False Memories and Beliefs. In Daniel L. Schacter & Elaine Scarry (eds.), Memory, Brain, and Belief. Harvard Univ Pr 35--86.
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  11.  2
    Mark H. Johnson, Suzanne Dziurawiec, Hadyn Ellis & John Morton (1991). Newborns' Preferential Tracking of Face-Like Stimuli and its Subsequent Decline. Cognition 40 (1-2):1-19.
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  12. Marcia K. Johnson & William Hirst (1991). Processing Subsystems of Memory. In R. Lister & H. Weingartner (eds.), Perspectives on Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 197--217.
     
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  13. Karen J. Mitchell & Marcia K. Johnson (2000). Source Monitoring: Attributing Mental Experiences. In Endel Tulving (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press 179--195.
     
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  14. Keith Anderson, Katherine Woods, William Alexander, Julian Ingram & Mark Johnson, Characters of the Dialogue.
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RECORDER'S PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
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  15. Chad S. Dodson & Marcia K. Johnson (1996). Some Problems with the Process-Dissociation Approach to Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (2):181.
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  16.  9
    Victoria Southgate, Mark H. Johnson & Gergely Csibra (2008). Infants Attribute Goals Even to Biomechanically Impossible Actions. Cognition 107 (3):1059-1069.
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  17. Julie A. Higgins & Marcia K. Johnson (2013). Lost Thoughts: Implicit Semantic Interference Impairs Reflective Access to Currently Active Information. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):6.
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  18.  98
    Scott F. Nolde, Marcia K. Johnson & Carol L. Raye (1998). The Role of Prefrontal Cortex During Tests of Episodic Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):399-406.
  19. M. Johnson (1998). False Memories and Confabulation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):137-145.
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  20. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and genetics. Johnson's book (...)
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  21.  31
    Mayada Elsabbagh & Mark H. Johnson (2010). Getting Answers From Babies About Autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):81-87.
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  22. Arber Tasimi & Marcia K. Johnson (2015). A Self-Serving Bias in Children’s Memories? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (3):528-533.
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  23.  2
    Natalie C. Ebner, Yi He & Marcia K. Johnson (2011). Age and Emotion Affect How We Look at a Face: Visual Scan Patterns Differ for Own-Age Versus Other-Age Emotional Faces. Cognition and Emotion 25 (6):983-997.
  24.  33
    Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.) (2011). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford.
    In the past thirty years, face perception has become an area of major interest within psychology. The Oxford Handbook of Face Perception is the most comprehensive and commanding review of the field ever published.For anyone looking for the definitive review of this burgeoning field, this is the essential book.
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  25. Natalie C. Ebner, Marcia K. Johnson & Håkan Fischer (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Reading Facial Emotions in Young and Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  26. M. Grillon, M. Johnson, M. Krebs & C. Huron (2008). Comparing Effects of Perceptual and Reflective Repetition on Subjective Experience During Later Recognition Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):753-764.
    Using the Remember/Know procedure, we compared the impact of a reflective repetition by refreshing and a perceptual repetition on subjective experience during recognition memory. Participants read aloud words as they appeared on a screen. Critical words were presented once , immediately repeated , or followed by a dot signalling the participants to think of and say the just-previous word . In Experiments 1 and 2, Remember responses benefited from refreshing a word . In Experiment 2, this benefit disappeared when participants (...)
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  27.  8
    Atsushi Senju, Gergely Csibra & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Understanding the Referential Nature of Looking: Infants’ Preference for Object-Directed Gaze. Cognition 108 (2):303-319.
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  28.  2
    Mark Johnson (1988). Out for the Count. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):589.
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  29.  10
    Marcia K. Johnson, John D. Bransford & Susan K. Solomon (1973). Memory for Tacit Implications of Sentences. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):203.
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  30.  13
    Mark H. Johnson & Leslie A. Tucker, The Emergence of the Social Brain Network: Evidence From Typical and Atypical Development.
    Several research groups have identified a network of regions of the adult cortex that are activated during social perception and cognition tasks. In this paper we focus on the development of components of this social brain network during early childhood and test aspects of a particular viewpoint on human functional brain development: “interactive specialization.” Specifically, we apply new data analysis techniques to a previously published data set of event-related potential ~ERP! studies involving 3-, 4-, and 12-month-old infants viewing faces of (...)
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  31.  5
    Jennifer Nado & Michael Johnson, Intuitions and the Theory of Reference.
    In this paper, we will examine the role that intuitions and responses to thought experiments play in confirming or disconfirming theories of reference, using insights from both debates as our starting point. Our view is that experimental evidence of the type elicited by MMNS does play a central role in the construction of theories of reference. This, however, is not because such theory construction is accurately characterized by "the method of cases." First, experimental philosophy does not directly collect data about (...)
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  32.  85
    Mark Johnson (2011). There is No Moral Faculty. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):409 - 432.
    Dewey's ethical naturalism has provided an exemplary model for many contemporary naturalistic treatments of morality. However, in some recent work there is an unfortunate tendency to presuppose a moral faculty as the alleged source of what are claimed to be nearly universal moral judgments. Marc Hauser's Moral minds (2006) thus argues that our shared moral intuitions arise from a universal moral organ, which he analogizes to a Chomskyan language faculty. Following Dewey's challenge to the postulation of the idea of universal (...)
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  33.  32
    Wendy Austin, Gillian Lemermeyer, Lisa Goldberg, Vangie Bergum & Melissa S. Johnson (2005). Moral Distress in Healthcare Practice: The Situation of Nurses. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):33-48.
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  34. M. K. Johnson, M. A. Foley, A. G. Suengas & C. L. Raye (1988). Phenomenal Characteristics of Memories for Perceivedand Imagined Autobiographical Events. Journal of Experimental Psychology 117:371-76.
     
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  35. Denis Mareschal, Sylvain Sirois, Gert Westermann & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Neuroconstructivism - Ii: Perspectives and Prospects. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? Neuroconstructivism is a pioneering 2 volume work that sets out a whole new framework for considering the complex topic of development, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging.
     
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  36. George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1980). Conceptual Metaphor in Everyday Language. Journal of Philosophy 77 (8):453-486.
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  37.  22
    Mark H. Johnson (2012). Executive Function and Developmental Disorders: The Flip Side of the Coin. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (9):454-457.
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  38. Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2003). The “What” and “Where” of Object Representations in Infancy. Cognition 88 (3):259-276.
  39.  4
    Teresa Farroni, Stefano Massaccesi, Enrica Menon & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Direct Gaze Modulates Face Recognition in Young Infants. Cognition 102 (3):396-404.
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  40.  48
    Mark Johnson (2014). Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding From the Perspective of Cognitive Science. University of Chicago Press.
    What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a pragmatist philosophical framework in Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science, Mark Johnson argues that appealing solely to absolute principles and values is not only scientifically unsound but even morally suspect. (...)
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  41.  35
    M. H. Johnson & Y. Munakata (2005). Processes of Change in Brain and Cognitive Development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):152-158.
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  42. Matthew Johnson & Massimo Pigliucci (2004). Is Knowledge of Science Associated with Higher Skepticism of Pseudoscientific Claims? American Biology Teacher 66 (8):536-548.
    We live in a world that is increasingly shaped by and bathed in science, with most scientific progress occurring in the past century, and much of it in the past few decades. Yet, several authors have puz- zled over the observation that modern societies are also characterized by a high degree of belief in a variety of pseudoscientific claims that have been thoroughly debunked or otherwise discarded by scientists.
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  43.  33
    Kathrin Cohen Kadosh & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Developing a Cortex Specialized for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):367-369.
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  44.  4
    Natalie C. Ebner & Marcia K. Johnson (2010). Age-Group Differences in Interference From Young and Older Emotional Faces. Cognition and Emotion 24 (7):1095-1116.
  45.  76
    Diego Fernandez-Duque & Mark Johnson (1999). Attention Metaphors: How Metaphors Guide the Cognitive Psychology of Attention. Cognitive Science 23 (1):83-116.
  46. Mark Johnson (2010). Cognitive Science and Dewey's Theory of Mind, Thought, and Language. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press
     
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  47.  19
    Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Précis of Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):321-331.
    Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition proposes a unifying framework for the study of cognitive development that brings together (1) constructivism (which views development as the progressive elaboration of increasingly complex structures), (2) cognitive neuroscience (which aims to understand the neural mechanisms underlying behavior), and (3) computational modeling (which proposes formal and explicit specifications of information processing). The guiding principle of our approach is context dependence, within and (in contrast to Marr [1982]) between levels of organization. We propose that three (...)
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  48.  75
    Monte Ransome Johnson (2012). Colloquium 4: The Medical Background of Aristotle’s Theory of Nature and Spontaneity. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):105-152.
    Abstract: An appreciation of the "more philosophical" aspects of ancient medical writings casts considerable light on Aristotle's concept of nature, and how he understands nature to differ from art, on the one hand, and spontaneity or luck, on the other. The account of nature, and its comparison with art and spontaneity in Physics II is developed with continual reference to the medical art. The notion of spontaneous remission of disease (without the aid of the medical art) was a controversial subject (...)
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  49.  5
    Matt A. Johnson, Nicholas B. Turk-Browne & Adele E. Goldberg (2013). Prediction Plays a Key Role in Language Development as Well as Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):360-361.
    Although the target article emphasizes the important role of prediction in language use, prediction may well also play a key role in the initial formation of linguistic representations, that is, in language development. We outline the role of prediction in three relevant language-learning domains: transitional probabilities, statistical preemption, and construction learning.
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  50.  4
    John Dyck & Matt Johnson (forthcoming). Appreciating Bad Art. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-14.
    There are some artworks which we appreciate for their bad artistic qualities; these artworks are said to be “good because bad”. This is puzzling. How can art be good just because it is bad? In this essay, we attempt to demystify this phenomenon. We offer a two-part analysis: the artistic flaws in these works make them bizarre, and this bizarreness is aesthetically valuable. Our analysis has the consequence that some artistic flaws make for aesthetic virtues. Such works therefore present a (...)
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