Search results for 'Joint Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor (...)
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  2. Christopher Peacocke (2005). Joint Attention: Its Nature, Reflexivity, and Relation to Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 298.score: 210.0
    The openness of joint awareness between two or more subjects is a perceptual phenomenon. It involves a certain mutual awareness between the subjects, an awareness that makes reference to that very awareness itself. Properly characterized, such awareness can generate iterated awareness ‘x is aware that y is aware that x is aware...’ to whatever level the subjects can sustain. The openness should not be characterized in terms of Lewis–Schiffer common knowledge, the conditions for which are not met in many (...)
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  3. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 210.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to (...)
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  4. Johannes Roessler (2005). Joint Attention and the Problem of Other Minds. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    The question of what it means to be aware of others as subjects of mental states is often construed as the question of how we are epistemically justified in attributing mental states to others. The dominant answer to this latter question is that we are so justified in virtue of grasping the role of mental states in explaining observed behaviour. This chapter challenges this picture and formulates an alternative by reflecting on the interpretation of early joint attention interactions. (...)
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  5. John Campbell (2005). Joint Attention and Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 287--297.score: 210.0
    This chapter makes the case for a relational version of an experientialist view of joint attention. On an experientialist view of joint attention, shifting from solitary attention to joint attention involves a shift in the nature of your perceptual experience of the object attended to. A relational analysis of such a view explains the latter shift in terms of the idea that, in joint attention, it is a constituent of your experience (...)
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  6. Jane Heal (2005). Joint Attention and Understanding the Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Oxford University PressJoint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 34--44.score: 186.0
    It is plausible to think, as many developmental psychologists do, that joint attention is important in the development of getting a full grasp on psychological notions. This chapter argues that this role of joint attention is best understood in the context of the simulation theory about the nature of psychological understanding rather than in the context of the theory. Episodes of joint attention can then be seen not as good occasions for learning a theory (...)
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  7. Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (2005). Joint Reminiscing as Joint Attention to the Past. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Johannes Roessler & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 260.score: 186.0
    We identify a particular type of causal reasoning ability that we believe is required for the possession of episodic memories, as it is needed to give substance to the distinction between the past and the present. We also argue that the same causal reasoning ability is required for grasping the point that another person's appeal to particular past events can have in conversation. We connect this to claims in developmental psychology that participation in joint reminiscing plays a key role (...)
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  8. Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2013). Delighting in Natural Beauty: Joint Attention and the Phenomenology of Nature Aesthetics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):167-186.score: 180.0
    Empirical research in the psychology of nature appreciation suggests that humans across cultures tend to evaluate nature in positive aesthetic terms, including a sense of beauty and awe. They also frequently engage in joint attention with other persons, whereby they are jointly aware of sharing attention to the same event or object. This paper examines how, from a natural theological perspective, delight in natural beauty can be conceptualized as a way of joining attention to creation. Drawing (...)
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  9. Fanny Lachat, Laurent Hugeville, Jean-Didier Lemarechal, Laurence Conty & Nathalie George (2012). Oscillatory Brain Correlates of Live Joint Attention: A Dual-EEG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    Joint attention consists in following another’s gaze onto an environmental object, which leads to the alignment of both subjects' attention onto this object. It is a fundamental mechanism of non-verbal communication, and it is essential for dynamic, online, interindividual synchronization during interactions. We aimed at investigating the oscillatory brain correlates of joint attention in a face-to-face paradigm where dyads of participants dynamically oriented their attention toward objects during joint and no-joint attention (...)
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  10. Ronny Geva Yana Gavrilov, Sarit Rotem, Renana Ofek (2012). Socio-Cultural Effects on Children's Initiation of Joint Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    Exchanging gazes with a social partner in response to an event in the environment is considered an effective means to direct attention, share affective experiences and highlight a target in the environment. This behavior appears during infancy and plays an important role in children's learning and in shaping their socio-emotional development. It has been suggested that cultural values of the community affect socio-emotional development through attentional dynamics of social reference (Rogoff et al., 1993). Maturational processes of brain-circuits have been (...)
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  11. Peter Mundy Kwanguk Kim (2012). Joint Attention, Social-Cognition, and Recognition Memory in Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    The early emerging capacity for Joint Attention, or socially coordinated visual attention, is thought to be integral to the development of social-cognition in childhood. Recent studies have also begun to suggest that joint attention affects adult cognition as well, but methodological limitations hamper research on this topic. To address this issue we developed a novel virtual reality (VR) paradigm that integrates eye-tracking and virtual avatar technology to measure two types of joint attention in (...)
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  12. Kwanguk Kim & Peter Mundy (2012). Joint Attention, Social-Cognition, and Recognition Memory in Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    The early emerging capacity for Joint Attention, or socially coordinated visual attention, is thought to be integral to the development of social-cognition in childhood. Recent studies have also begun to suggest that joint attention affects adult cognition as well, but methodological limitations hamper research on this topic. To address this issue we developed a novel virtual reality (VR) paradigm that integrates eye-tracking and virtual avatar technology to measure two types of joint attention in (...)
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  13. Juan-Carlos Gómez (2005). Joint Attention and the Notion of Subject: Insights From Apes, Normal Children, and Children with Autism. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    This chapter proposes that the cognitive mechanisms of joint attention (defined as a combination of attention following skills with attention contact skills) are not metarepresentational in nature, but based upon the coordination of two different types of intentional understanding — third-person and second-person intentions — that are represented at the level of a sensorimotor notion of others as subjects. This proposal is developed and analyzed from a comparative perspective through a review of findings concerning apes, typically (...)
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  14. R. Peter Hobson (2005). What Puts the Jointness Into Joint Attention? In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 185.score: 150.0
    This chapter argues that joint attention needs to be understood in terms of one person's engagement with another person's engagement with the world. It is pivotal from a developmental perspective that we have an appropriate view of what is involved when we share experiences, or when we perceive and align with another person's ‘attention’ as a bodily-expressed and affectively toned relation with the environment. The chapter explores these theoretical issues through studies involving children with autism, who have (...)
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  15. Laura E. Thomas Hsin-Mei Sun (2013). Biased Attention Near Another's Hand Following Joint Action. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 144.0
    Previous research has shown that attention is prioritized for the space near the hand, leading to faster detection of visual targets appearing close to one’s own hand. In the present study, we examined whether observers are also facilitated in detecting targets presented near another’s hand by having participants perform a Posner cueing task while sitting next to a friend. Across blocks, either the participant or the friend placed a hand next to one of the target locations. Our results robustly (...)
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  16. Anika Fiebich & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Joint Attention in Joint Action. Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):571-87.score: 120.0
    In this paper, we investigate the role of intention and joint attention in joint actions. Depending on the shared intentions the agents have, we distinguish between joint path-goal actions and joint final-goal actions. We propose an instrumental account of basic joint action analogous to a concept of basic action and argue that intentional joint attention is a basic joint action. Furthermore, we discuss the functional role of intentional joint attention (...)
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  17. Joel Smith (2006). Review of Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (Eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1126-9.score: 120.0
    You and I are watching a spider crawl across the carpet. We are both aware of the spider, and aware that both are so aware. We are jointly attending to it. This collection of essays addresses a bewildering array of questions that arise regarding the notion of joint attention. How should joint attention be characterised in adults? In particular, how can we articulate the sense in which it is plausible to say that nothing is hidden from (...)
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  18. Axel Seemann (2007). Joint Attention, Collective Knowledge, and the "We" Perspective. Social Epistemology 21 (3):217 – 230.score: 120.0
    In this paper, I am concerned with the practical aspect of joint attention. In particular, I ask what enables us to engage in joint activities, and go on to suggest that on a representational account of joint attention, this question cannot be satisfactorily answered. I explore John Campbell's "relational" approach and suggest that if one couples it with Peter Hobson's notion of "feeling perception", one may be in a position to account for the action-enabling aspect (...)
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  19. Axel Seemann (2010). The Other Person in Joint Attention: A Relational Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):161-182.score: 120.0
    John Campbell recommends a relational view on joint attention. In this paper, I ask what his position implies for the perceptual experience of jointly engaged persons, and suggest that this experience can be accounted for by taking seriously the notion of intersubjectivity. I provide an account of what I call the 'direct acquaintance' of jointly engaged persons with one another. To be so acquainted is to enjoy an experience of feelings that are shared in a particular way. I (...)
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  20. Ingar Brink (2004). Joint Attention, Triangulation and Radical Interpretation: A Problem and its Solution. Dialectica 58 (2):179–206.score: 120.0
    By describing the aim of triangulation as locating the object of thoughts and utterances, Davidson has given it the double role of accounting for both the individuation of content and the sense in which content necessarily is public. The focus of this article is on how triangulation may contribute to the individuation of content. I maintain that triangulation may serve to break into the intentional circle of meaning and belief, yet without forcing us to renounce the claims concerning the interdependence (...)
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  21. Tom Cochrane (2009). Joint Attention to Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):59-73.score: 120.0
    This paper contrasts individual and collective listening to music, with particular regard to the expressive qualities of music. In the first half of the paper a general model of joint attention is introduced. According to this model, perceiving together modifies the intrinsic structure of the perceptual task, and encourages a convergence of responses to a greater or lesser degree. The model is then applied to music, looking first at the silent listening situation typical to the classical concert hall, (...)
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  22. Johan Modée (2000). Observation Sentences and Joint Attention. Synthese 124 (2):221-238.score: 120.0
    The aim of this paper is to examine W. V.Quine's theory of infants' early acquisition oflanguage, with a narrow focus on Quine's theory ofobservation sentences. Intersubjectivity and sensoryexperiences, the two features that characterise thenotion, receive the most attention. It is argued,following a suggestion from Donald Davidson, thatQuine favours a proximal theory of languageacquisition, i.e., a theory which is focused onprivate experiences as ultimate sources ofstimulation, contrary to a distal theory, where thestimulus source is located in externally observableobjects and (...)
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  23. Bhismadev Chakrabarti & Simon Baron-Cohen (2008). Can the Shared Circuits Model (SCM) Explain Joint Attention or Perception of Discrete Emotions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):24-25.score: 120.0
    The shared circuits model (SCM) is a bold attempt to explain how humans make sense of action, at different levels. In this commentary we single out five concerns: (1) the lack of a developmental account, (2) the absence of double-dissociation evidence, (3) the neglect of joint attention and joint action, (4) the inability to explain discrete emotion perception, and (5) the lack of predictive power or testability of the model. We conclude that Hurley's model requires further work (...)
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  24. Elizabeth Redcay, Mario Kleiner & Rebecca Saxe (2012). Look at This: The Neural Correlates of Initiating and Responding to Bids for Joint Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
    When engaging in joint attention, one person directs another person’s attention to an object (Initiating Joint Attention, IJA), and the second person’s attention follows (Responding to Joint Attention, RJA). As such, joint attention must occur within the context of a social interaction. This ability is critical to language and social development; yet the neural bases for this pivotal skill remain understudied. This paucity of research is likely due to the challenge (...)
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  25. Timothy Martell (2010). Phenomenology of Joint Attention. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (2).score: 120.0
    It is one thing for two or more persons to perceive the same object, and it is quite another for two or more persons to perceive the same object together. The latter phenomenon is called joint attention and has recently garnered considerable interest from psychologists. However, contemporary psychological research has not succeeded in clarifying how persons can share perception of an object. Joint attention thus stands in need of phenomenological clarification. Surprisingly, this has yet to be (...)
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  26. John Campbell (forthcoming). An Object-Dependent Perspective on Joint Attention. In Axel Seemann (ed.), Joint Attention: New Developments in Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience. The MIT Press.score: 120.0
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  27. Juan Carlos Gomez (2005). Joint Attention and the Notion of Subject: Insights From Apes, Normal Children, and Children with Autism. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
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  28. J. Campbell (2002). Joint Attention and Simulation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins. 241-253 (with a reply by Elisabe.score: 102.0
  29. Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.score: 90.0
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition and (...)
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  30. Joel Krueger (2011). Doing Things with Music. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.score: 90.0
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among other (...)
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  31. Christopher Mole (2005). Review of Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack, Johannes Roessler (Eds), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds -- Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (9).score: 90.0
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  32. John Campbell (1998). Joint Attention and the First Person. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Current Issues in Philosophy of Mind: Royal Institute of Philosophy Annual Supplement. Cambridge University Press. 123-136..score: 90.0
  33. P. Nuku & H. Bekkering (2008). Joint Attention: Inferring What Others Perceive (and Don't Perceive). Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):339-349.score: 90.0
  34. Jasmina Ivšac (forthcoming). The Phenomenon of Joint Attention. Mind.score: 90.0
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  35. Lawrence Cahoone (2013). Mead, Joint Attention, and the Human Difference. The Pluralist 8 (2):1-25.score: 90.0
    The struggle between the parties bent on inflating humanity's self-conception and those bent on deflating it continues. Mind, consciousness, soul, reason, free will, language, culture, tool-use—all have been invoked as the unique character of the human, some deriving from Judeo-Christian religion, others from classical philosophy and modern anthropology. Opponents, sometimes motivated by ethical concerns about the treatment of animals, and buoyed by scientific advances in animal and especially primate studies, have either deconstructed these traits or ascribed them to nonhumans. Seeking (...)
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  36. Petr Urban (2014). Joint Attention and Anthropological Difference. Environmental Philosophy 11 (1):59-70.score: 90.0
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  37. Takeshi Konno & Masayoshi Shibata (2011). Joint-Attention-Robots Aiming at Recursive Understanding of Intentions. Kagaku Tetsugaku 44 (2):2_29-2_45.score: 90.0
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  38. Henrike Moll & Andrew N. Meltzoff (2011). Foundation in Joint Attention. In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press. 286.score: 90.0
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  39. Hiroki C. Tanabe, Hirotaka Kosaka, Daisuke N. Saito, Takahiko Koike, Masamichi J. Hayashi, Keise Izuma, Hidetsugu Komeda, Makoto Ishitobi, Masao Omori, Toshio Munesue, Hidehiko Okazawa, Yuji Wada & Norihiro Sadato (2012). Hard to “Tune In”: Neural Mechanisms of Live Face-to-Face Interaction with High-Functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are known to have difficulty with eye contact. This might make it difficult for partners to communicate with them face-to-face. To elucidate the neural substrates of live inter-subject interactions of ASD patients and typically-developed (normal) subjects, we conducted hyper-scanning functional MRI with 21 subjects with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) paired with normal subjects, and with 19 pairs of normal subjects as a control. Baseline eye contact was maintained while subjects performed a real-time joint- (...) task. The task-related effects were modeled out, and inter-individual correlation analysis was performed on the residual time-course data. ASD–Normal pairs were less accurate at detecting gaze direction than Normal–Normal pairs. Performance was impaired both in ASD subjects and in their normal partners. The left occipital pole activation caused by gaze processing was reduced in ASD subjects, suggesting that deterioration of eye-cue detection in ASD is related to impairment of early visual processing of gaze. By contrast, their normal partners showed greater activity in the bilateral occipital cortex and the right prefrontal area, indicating a compensatory workload. Inter-brain coherence in the right IFG reported previously in Normal–Normal pairs during eye contact was diminished in ASD–Normal pairs. Intra-brain functional connectivity between the right IFG and right superior temporal sulcus (STS) in normal subjects paired with ASD subjects was reduced compared with in Normal–Normal pairs. This functional connectivity was positively correlated with performance of normal partners in eye-cue detection. Considering the integrative role of the right STS in gaze processing, inter-subject synchronization during eye contact might be a prerequisite for eye-cue detection by the normal partner. (shrink)
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  40. Derya Kadipasaoglu Henrike Moll (2013). The Primacy of Social Over Visual Perspective-Taking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    In this article, we argue for the developmental primacy of social over visual perspective-taking. In our terminology, social perspective-taking involves some understanding of another person’s preferences, goals, intentions etc. which can be discerned from temporally extended interactions, including dialogue. As is evidenced by their successful performance on various reference disambiguation tasks, infants in their second year of life first begin to develop such skills. They can, for example, determine which of two or more objects another is referring to based on (...)
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  41. William D. Hopkins, Maria Misiura, Lisa A. Reamer, Jennifer A. Schaeffer, Mary C. Mareno & Steven J. Schapiro (2014). Poor Receptive Joint Attention Skills Are Associated with Atypical Gray Matter Asymmetry in the Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus of Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes). Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 90.0
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  42. Frédéric Kaplan & Verena V. Hafner (2006). The Challenges of Joint Attention. Interaction Studies 7 (2):135-169.score: 90.0
  43. Clemens Knobloch (1998). Reference: Grammaticalizing Joint Attention. Pragmatics and Cognition 6 (1):245-264.score: 90.0
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  44. David Leavens & Timothy Racine (2009). Joint Attention in Apes and Humans: Are Humans Unique? Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (6-8):240-267.score: 90.0
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  45. Kai Vogeley Ulrich J. Pfeiffer, Leonhard Schilbach, Mathis Jording, Bert Timmermans, Gary Bente (2012). Eyes on the Mind: Investigating the Influence of Gaze Dynamics on the Perception of Others in Real-Time Social Interaction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    Social gaze provides a window into the interests and intentions of others and allows us to actively point out our own. It enables us to engage in triadic interactions involving human actors and physical objects and to build an indispensable basis for coordinated action and collaborative efforts. The object-related aspect of gaze in combination with the fact that any motor act of looking encompasses both input and output of the minds involved makes this non-verbal cue system particularly interesting for research (...)
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  46. Andrew P. Bayliss, Emily Murphy, Claire K. Naughtin, Ada Kritikos, Leonhard Schilbach & Stefanie I. Becker (2013). “Gaze Leading”: Initiating Simulated Joint Attention Influences Eye Movements and Choice Behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):76.score: 90.0
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  47. Charman (2004). Why is Joint Attention a Pivotal Skill in Autism? In Uta Frith & Elisabeth Hill (eds.), Autism: Mind and Brain. Oup Oxford.score: 90.0
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  48. Henrike Moll & Andrew N. Meltzoff (2011). Perspective-Taking and its Foundation in Joint Attention. In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
     
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  49. Elisabeth Pacherie (2002). Reply to Joint Attention and Simulation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 90.0
     
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  50. Ben Robins, Paul Dickerson, Penny Stribling & Kerstin Dautenhahn (2004). Robot-Mediated Joint Attention in Children with Autism: A Case Study in Robot-Human Interaction. Interaction Studies 5 (2):161-198.score: 90.0
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