1. Andreas Birnik & Jon Billsberry (2008). Reorienting the Business School Agenda: The Case for Relevance, Rigor, and Righteousness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):985 - 999.
    This article contributes to the current debate regarding management education and research. It frames the current business school critique as a paradox regarding the arguments for ‘self-interest’ versus ‘altruism’ as human motives. Based on this, a typology of management with four representative types labeled: unguided, altruistic, egoistic, and righteous is developed. It is proposed that the path to the future of management education and research might be found by relegitimizing the ‘altruistic’ spirit of the classics of the great Axial Age (...)
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  2. David A. Coldwell, Jon Billsberry, Nathalie van Meurs & Philip J. G. Marsh (2008). The Effects of Person–Organization Ethical Fit on Employee Attraction and Retention: Towards a Testable Explanatory Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):611 - 622.
    An exploratory model is presented as a heuristic to indicate how individual perceptions of corporate reputation (before joining) and corporate ethical values (after joining) generate specific individual organizational senses of fit. The paper suggests that an ethical dimension of person-organization fit may go some way in explaining superior acquisition and retention of staff by those who are attracted to specific organizations by levels of corporate social performance consonant with their ethical expectations, or who remain with them by virtue of better (...)
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