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  1.  79
    Jon Fennell (2013). Plausibility and Common Sense. Tradition and Discovery 40 (1):45-52.
    Thomas Nagel’s Mind and Cosmos, an analytic philosophical excursion into the meaning and implications of the mind-body problem, has striking parallels to Michael Polanyi’s thought, especially as it is captured in Personal Knowledge. Indeed, Nagel’s courageous and honest challenge to the evolutionary naturalistic orthodoxy that is currently ascendant in elite opinion is perhaps best understood, via Nagel’s emphasis on plausibility and common sense, in terms of the faith and commitment that Polanyi places at the center of his thought. But the (...)
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  2.  2
    Jon Fennell (2016). Polanyi’s “Illumination:” Aristotelian Induction or Peircean Abduction? Tradition and Discovery 42 (3):42-54.
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  3.  68
    Jon Fennell (2010). Polanyi's Arguments Against a Non-Judgmental Political Science. Tradition and Discovery 37 (1):6-18.
    Michael Polanyi articulates two arguments against the view that moral judgment has no proper place in the conduct of political science: Non-judgmental political science cannot understand what it studies; and non-judgmental political science cannot understand the political scientist himself. Evaluation of these arguments not only clarifies important dimensions of Polanyi’s conceptions of understanding and tacit inference, it prompts a reconsideration of the nature of both moral deliberation and moral truth. The encounter with Polanyi demonstrates that non-judgmental political science does indeed (...)
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  4.  18
    Jon Fennell (1999). Bloom and His Critics: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Aims of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):405-434.
    The central questions raised by Allan Bloom's The Closing of theAmerican Mind are often overlooked. Among the most important ofBloom's themes is the impact of nihilism upon education. Bloom condemnsnihilism. Interestingly, we find among his critics two alternativejudgments. Richard Schacht, citing Nietzsche, asserts that nihilism,while fruitless in and of itself, is a necessary prerequisite tosomething higher. Harry Neumann, affirming the accuracy of nihilism,declares that both Bloom and Nietzsche reject nihilism out of ignoranceborn of weakness. All three philosophers understand that the (...)
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  5.  5
    Jon Fennell & Rudy Liveritte (1979). Kuhn, Education, and the Grounds of Rationality. Educational Theory 29 (2):117-127.
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  6.  2
    Jon Fennell (2006). Foster McMurray's Philosophy of Public Education. Educational Studies 40 (2):152-163.
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  7.  2
    Jon Fennell (2013). Polanyi, Universals, and the Nominalism Controversy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (4):365-387.
    Among the traditional issues in philosophy that are directly affected by Michael Polanyi's revolutionary epistemology and its related ontology are nominalism and the question of universals. Polanyi's treatment of these matters is particularly fruitful, for it not only clarifies his conceptions of "tacit knowing" and "indwelling" but also illuminates his understanding of truth and reality and introduces us to his views on induction. Such inquiry will also demonstrate a deep affinity between Polanyi's position and that of Charles Sanders Peirce, while (...)
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  8.  2
    Jon Fennell (2005). Afterwords. Educational Theory 55 (2):231-233.
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  9. Shadia B. Drury, Jon Fennell, Tim McDonough, Heinrich Meier, Neil G. Robertson, Timothy L. Simpson, J. G. York, Catherine H. Zuckert & Michael Zuckert (2011). Leo Strauss, Education, and Political Thought. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This collection by some of the leading scholars of Strauss's work is the first devoted to Strauss's thought regarding education. It seeks to address his conception of education as it applies to a range of his most important concepts, such as his views on the importance of revelation, his critique of modern democracy and the importance of modern classical education.
     
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  10. Jon Fennell (2002). Afterwords. Educational Theory 52 (3):375-376.
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  11. Harriet B. Morrison, John H. Chilcott, Ezrl Atzmon, John T. Zepper, Milton K. Reimer, Gillian Elliott Smith, James E. Christensen, Albert E. Bender, Nancy R. King, W. Sherman Rush, Ann H. Hastings, Kenneth V. Lottich, J. Theodore Klein, Sally H. Wertheim, Bernard J. Kohlbrenner, William T. Lowe, Beverly Lindsay, Ronald E. Butchart, E. Dean Butler, Jon M. Fennell & Eleanor Kallman Roemer (1981). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 11 (4):403-435.
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  12. John Valentine, Jon Fennell, Stephen Leach, Greg Moses, Juha Hiedanpää & Daniel W. Bromley (2013). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (4).
     
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