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Profile: Jon Robson (Nottingham University)
  1. Sarah Adams & Jon Robson (forthcoming). Does Absence Make Atheistic Belief Grow Stronger? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-20.
    Discussion of the role which religious experience can play in warranting theistic belief has received a great deal of attention within contemporary philosophy of religion. By contrast, the relationship between experience and atheistic belief has received relatively little focus. Our aim in this paper is to begin to remedy that neglect. In particular, we focus on the hitherto under-discussed question of whether experiences of God’s absence can provide positive epistemic status for a belief in God’s nonexistence. We argue that there (...)
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  2. Benjamin L. Curtis & Jon Robson (forthcoming). A Critical Introduction to the Metaphysics of Time. Bloomsbury.
  3. Jon Robson (forthcoming). A Social Epistemology of Aesthetics: Belief Polarization, Echo Chambers and Aesthetic Judgement. Synthese.
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  4. Jon Robson (forthcoming). Comics and Ethics. In F. Bramlett, R. Cook & A. Meskin (eds.), Routledge Companion to Comics and Graphic Novels. Routledge
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  5. Jon Robson (forthcoming). Religious Fictionalism and the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies.
     
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  6. Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (2015). Taste and Acquaintance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2):127-139.
    The analogy between gustatory taste and critical or aesthetic taste plays a recurring role in the history of aesthetics. Our interest in this article is in a particular way in which gustatory judgments are frequently thought to be analogous to critical judgments. It appears obvious to many that to know how a particular object tastes we must have tasted it for ourselves; the proof of the pudding, we are all told, is in the eating. And it has seemed just as (...)
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  7. Jon Robson (2015). Norms of Belief and Norms of Assertion in Aesthetics. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (6).
    Why is it that we cannot legitimately make certain aesthetic assertions – for instance that ‘Guernica is harrowing’ or that ‘The Rite of Spring is strangely beautiful’ – on the basis of testimony alone? In this paper I consider a species of argument intended to demonstrate that the best explanation for the impermissibility of such assertions is that a particular view of the norms of aesthetic belief – pessimism concerning aesthetic testimony – is correct. I begin by outlining the strongest (...)
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  8. Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.) (2014). Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. OUP Oxford.
    How far should philosophical accounts of the value and interpretation of art be sensitive to the scientific approaches used by psychologists, sociologists, and evolutionary thinkers? A team of experts urge different answers to this question, and explore how empirical inquiry can shed light on problems traditionally regarded as philosophical.
     
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  9. Jon Robson (2014). Aesthetic Autonomy and Self-Aggrandisement. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:3-28.
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  10. Jon Robson (2014). Artworld Metaphysics, by Robert Kraut. Mind 123 (492):1201-1205.
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  11. Jon Robson (2014). A-Time to Die: A Growing Block Account of the Evil of Death. Philosophia 42 (4):911-925.
    In this paper I argue that the growing block theory of time has rather surprising, and hitherto unexplored, explanatory benefits when it comes to certain enduring philosophical puzzles concerning death. In particular, I claim the growing block theorist has readily available and convincing answers to the following questions: Why is it an evil to be dead but not an evil to be not yet born? How can death be an evil for the dead if they no longer exist to suffer (...)
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  12. Jon Robson (2014). Does Veronica Trust Anyone? In George Dunn & James South (eds.), Veronica Mars and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 109-22.
     
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  13. Jon Robson (2014). Heidegger and Analytic Philosophy: Together at Last? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (3):482-487.
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  14. Jon Robson (2013). Aesthetic Testimony and the Norms of Belief Formation. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (2).
    Unusability pessimism has recently emerged as an appealing new option for pessimists about aesthetic testimony—those who deny the legitimacy of forming aesthetic beliefs on the basis of testimony. Unusability pessimists argue that we should reject the traditional pessimistic stance that knowledge of aesthetic matters is unavailable via testimony in favour of the view that while such knowledge is available to us, it is unusable. This unusability stems from the fact that accepting such testimony would violate an important non-epistemic norm of (...)
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  15. Jon Robson (2013). The Art of Comics—A Philosophical Approach. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):ayt001.
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  16. Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (2012). Fiction and Fictional Worlds in Videogames. In J. R. Sageng, T. M. Larsen & H. Fossheim (eds.), The Philosophy of Computer Games. Springer 201-18.
     
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  17. Jon Robson (2012). Aesthetic Testimony. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):1-10.
    It is frequently claimed that we can learn very little, if anything, about the aesthetic character of an artwork on the basis of testimony. Such disparaging assessments of the epistemic value of aesthetic testimony contrast markedly with our acceptance of testimony as an important source of knowledge in many other areas. There have, however, been a number of challenges to this orthodoxy of late; from those who seek to deny that such a contrast exists as well as attempts by those (...)
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  18. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were sound (...)
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  19. Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin (2012). Videogames and the First Person. In G. Currie, P. Kotako & M. Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publishing
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  20. Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (2011). Videogames and the Moving Image. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:547-564.
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  21. Nikk Effingham & Jon Robson (2007). A Mereological Challenge to Endurantism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):633 – 640.
    In this paper, we argue that time travel is problematic for the endurantist. For it appears to be possible, given time travel, to construct a wall out of a single time travelling brick. This commits the endurantist to one of the following: (a) the wall is composed of the time travelling brick many times over; (b) the wall does not in fact exist at all; (c) the wall is identical to the brick. We argue that each of these options is (...)
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