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Profile: Jon Robson (Nottingham University)
  1. Greg Currie, Aaron Meskin, Matthew Kieran & Jon Robson (eds.) (forthcoming). Aesthetics and the Sciences of the Mind. Oxford University Press.
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  2. Jon Robson (forthcoming). A Social Epistemology of Aesthetics: Belief Polarization, Echo Chambers and Aesthetic Judgement. Synthese.
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  3. Jon Robson (forthcoming). A-Time to Die: A Growing Block Account of the Evil of Death. Philosophia:1-15.
    In this paper I argue that the growing block theory of time has rather surprising, and hitherto unexplored, explanatory benefits when it comes to certain enduring philosophical puzzles concerning death. In particular, I claim the growing block theorist has readily available and convincing answers to the following questions: (i) Why is it an evil to be dead but not an evil to be not yet born? (ii) How can death be an evil for the dead if they no longer exist (...)
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  4. Jon Robson (2014). Aesthetic Autonomy and Self-Aggrandisement. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:3-28.
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  5. Jon Robson (2014). Heidegger and Analytic Philosophy: Together at Last? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (3):482-487.
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  6. Jon Robson (2013). Aesthetic Testimony and the Norms of Belief Formation. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3).
    Unusability pessimism has recently emerged as an appealing new option for pessimists about aesthetic testimony—those who deny the legitimacy of forming aesthetic beliefs on the basis of testimony. Unusability pessimists argue that we should reject the traditional pessimistic stance that knowledge of aesthetic matters is unavailable via testimony in favour of the view that while such knowledge is available to us, it is unusable. This unusability stems from the fact that accepting such testimony would violate an important non-epistemic norm of (...)
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  7. Jon Robson (2013). The Art of Comics—A Philosophical Approach. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):ayt001.
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  8. Jon Robson (2012). Aesthetic Testimony. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):1-10.
  9. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were sound (...)
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  10. Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (2011). Videogames and the Moving Image. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:547-564.
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  11. Nikk Effingham & Jon Robson (2007). A Mereological Challenge to Endurantism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):633 – 640.
    In this paper, we argue that time travel is problematic for the endurantist. For it appears to be possible, given time travel, to construct a wall out of a single time travelling brick. This commits the endurantist to one of the following: (a) the wall is composed of the time travelling brick many times over; (b) the wall does not in fact exist at all; (c) the wall is identical to the brick. We argue that each of these options is (...)
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