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  1. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2012). Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.
    What follows when quantum theory is applied to the whole universe? This is one of the greatest puzzles of modern science. Philosophers and physicists here debate the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics, according to which this universe is one of countlessly many others, constantly branching in time, all of which are real.
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  2. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2010). Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. Oxford University Press.
    These are the questions which an illustrious team of philosophers and physicists debate in this volume.
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  3. Jonathan Barrett & Adrian Kent (2004). Non-Contextuality, Finite Precision Measurement and the Kochen–Specker Theorem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):151-176.
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  4. Jonathan Barrett (1991). Really Taking Darwin and the Naturalistic Fallacy Seriously: An Objection to Rottschaefer and Martinsen. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):433-437.
    Out of a concern to respect the naturalistic fallacy, Ruse (1986) argues for the possibility of causal, but not justificatory, explanations of morality in terms of evolutionary processes. In a discussion of Ruse's work, Rottschaefer and Martinsen (1990) claim that he erroneously limits the explanatory scope of evolutionary concepts, because he fails to see that one can have objective moral properties without committing either of two forms of the naturalistic fallacy, if one holds that moral properties supervene on non-moral properties. (...)
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