151 found
Sort by:
  1. Jonathan Bennett, Eight Questions About Spinoza.
    Perhaps the biggest radically unsolved problem about Part II of the Ethics is something that occurs in Part I, namely the definition of ‘attribute’ as ‘that which intellect perceives of substance as its essence’ (1d4). The term ‘intellect’ brings in just one of the attributes, namely thought, raising the question: A. What special privilege does thought have that entitles it to figure in the explanation of the..
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jonathan Bennett, God and Matter in Locke.
    Although we never made time to talk it out thoroughly, Margaret Wilson and I shared an interest in, and enthusiasm for, the tenth chapter in Locke’s Essay IV, entitled ‘Of Our Knowledge of the Existence of a GOD.’ In the present paper, written in sad tribute to her work and her person, I shall expound that deep, subtle, intricate, flawed chapter. While I shall evaluate its arguments as I go, I chiefly aim just to make clear what happens in those (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jonathan Bennett, Glimpses of Spinoza.
    About thirty years ago I began studying Spinoza’s philosophy, especially as expressed in his Ethics. In these pages I shall describe some aspects of his thought, in the hope of making him sound worth the intermittent labor of three decades. The best reasons for finding him so absorbingly interesting lie in hard, technical details which cannot be presented here, but I hope I can say something from which an impression may emerge.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jonathan Bennett, Leibniz's New Essays.
    In his New Essays on Human Understanding, Leibniz presents an extended critical commentary on Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Leibniz read some of Locke’s work in English and then, a few years later, the whole of it in French, a language in which he was more comfortable. Over a period of about two further years, on and off, he wrote his New Essays, which he finished at about the time Locke died and which was not published until about half a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonathan Bennett, Mind and Brain in the 17th Century.
    Descartes bequeathed to his successors what he and they thought to be a sharp, deep split between the mental and the material. He thought it was a split between things, with every thing belonging to one of the two kinds and no thing belonging to both. According to him, a human being is a pair, a duo, a mind and a body; or, more strictly, a human being is a mind that is tightly related to an animal body. The exact (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jonathan Bennett, On Maximising Happiness.
    When it is wrong to bring into existence someone who will be miserable, what makes it wrong is not the threat of misery hanging over the possible person, but rather the fact that if one does it there will be real misery for an actual person. This belongs in the same category as the wrongness of making a happy person miserable, or of failing to make a person less miserable than he is. These arc all matters of the (dis)utilities—the ill-fare (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jonathan Bennett & Peter Remnant, How Matter Might at First Be Made.
    In the fourth book of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding Locke hints that he could explain how God may have created matter ex nihilo, but refrains from doing so. Leibniz, when he came upon this passage, pricked up his ears. There ensued a sequence of personal events which are not without charm and piquancy, and a sequence of philosophical events which are of some interest. In this paper we tell the tale.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jonathan Bennett, (Excerpted From “Philosophy and Mr Stoppard”.
    Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead is primarily a display of conceptual interrelationships of the same logical kind as might occur in an academic work of analytic philosophy. Its pyrotechnic show of jokes, puns and cross-purposes consists mainly in sparks thrown off by the underlying conceptual exploration. That philosophical insights are closely connected with jokes is a fact which Carroll exploited in Through the Looking Glass, a work which is brim-full of small-scale philosophy. Stoppard, unlike Carroll, works intensively at (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jonathan Bennett, Nz $75.00.
    This thousand-page book contains one third of the text of Samuel Pepys's diary, along with maps, a chronology, a glossary of archaic words, and an unusually helpful index, The diary, written in commercial short-hand, spans the 1660s, a decade in which power passed from the Roundheads to Charles II, London was ravaged by plague and then by fire, the English repeatedly fought the Dutch, and Pepys grew to be one of the most important civil servants in the land ("the father (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jonathan Bennett, On Being Forced to a Conclusion.
    The only way to settle conclusively what any part of a language means is to discover the circumstances, both linguistic and non-linguistic, in which the speakers of the language are prepared to use it. This is not a new doctrine, but Wittgenstein gave it new life by dramatising the following question: If someone used an expression in a radically non-standard way, could anything he said about his state of mind convince us that he nevertheless meant it in a standard way? (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jonathan Bennett, Remarkable Website Descartes.
    Mickelsen’s site also has translations of the texts by Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza, and Kant, and of Leibniz’s Discourse on Metaphysics and his Monadology. These may be the best in the public domain (and thus the best available on the internet).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jonathan Bennett, Thoughtful Brutes.
    I am interested in what main differences there are between Homo sapiens and other known terrestrial species, or (for short) between man and beast. We have a sense that we differ vastly from all the rest in some respect that is mental rather than grossly physical, but we are not agreed on what respect it is. This is my topic today. I shall bring in some work done in recent years by ethologists and animal psychologists. It is relevant less because (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jonathan Bennett (2009). Commentary on Papers by Detlev Ploog and Ursula Bellugi. Brain and Mind 908:119.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jonathan Bennett (2005). Leibniz's Two Realms. In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. 135--155.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jonathan Bennett (2004). Time in Human Experience. Philosophy 79 (308):165-183.
    A set of eight mini-discourses. 1. The conceivability of the physical world's running in the opposite temporal direction. 2. Augustine's reason for thinking this is not conceivable for the world of the mind. 3. Trying to imagine being a creature that lives atemporally. 4. Memory's need for causal input. 5. Acting in the knowledge that how one acts is strictly determined. 6. The Newcomb problem. 7. The idea that all voluntary action is intended to be remedial. 8. Haunted by the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jonathan Bennett (2003). A Philosophical Guide to Conditionals. Oxford University Press.
    Conditional sentences are among the most intriguing and puzzling features of language, and analysis of their meaning and function has important implications for, and uses in, many areas of philosophy. Jonathan Bennett, one of the world's leading experts, distils many years' work and teaching into this Philosophical Guide to Conditionals, the fullest and most authoritative treatment of the subject. An ideal introduction for undergraduates with a philosophical grounding, it also offers a rich source of illumination and stimulation for graduate students (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 1. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 1: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an excellent (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers, Volume 2: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Clarendon Press.
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jonathan Bennett (2002). Empiricism About Meanings. In Peter Millican (ed.), Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. Clarendon Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jonathan Bennett (2002). What Events Are. In Richard M. Gale (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers. 43.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Conditionals and Explanations Jonathan Bennett. In Alex Byrne, Robert Stalnaker & Ralph Wedgwood (eds.), Fact and Value. Mit Press. 1.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Volume 2. Clarendon Press.
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descaretes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can be learned from its success or failure? For newcomers to the early modern scene, this clearly written work is an excellent (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jonathan Bennett (2001). On Forward and Backward Counterfactual Conditionals. In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman and Littlefield. 177--202.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jonathan Francis Bennett (2001). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 Volumes. Oxford University Press (Hardcover).
    In this illuminating, highly engaging book, Jonathan Bennett acquaints us with the ideas of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. For newcomers to the early modern scene, this lucidly written work is an excellent introduction. For those already familiar with the time period, this book offers insight into the great philosophers, treating them as colleagues, antagonists, students, and teachers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jonathan Bennett (1999). Space and Subtle Matter in Descartes's Metaphysics. In Gennaro Rocco & Huenemann Charles (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford. 1.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jonathan Bennett (1998). Descartes' Theory of Modality. In John Cottingham (ed.), Descartes. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jonathan Bennett & Samuel Gorovitz (1997). Improving Academic Writing. Teaching Philosophy 20 (2):105-120.
    When they’re offered to the world in merry guise, Unpleasant truths are swallowed with a will. For he who’d make his fellow-creatures wise Should always gild the philosophic pill. - Jack Point to Sir Richard Cholmondeley, Lieutenant of the Tower, in an employment interview in Yeomen of the Guard. W. S. Gilbert..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John P. Carriero, Peter J. Markie, Stephen Schiffer, Robert Delahunty, Frederick J. O'Toole, David M. Rosenthal, Fred Feldman, Anthony Kenny, Margaret D. Wilson, John Cottingham & Jonathan Bennett (1997). Descartes's Meditations: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jonathan Bennett (1996). Ideas and Qualities in Locke's "Essay". History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):73 - 88.
    This paper argues that Locke often used "ideas" to stand for qualities, and used the quality-word "mode" to stand for ideas, because of a substantive conflation in his thought; not because of a mere superficial ambiguity in his use of the word "idea." Suggestions are offered as to the possible sources of this conflation.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jonathan Bennett (1995). Classifying Conditionals: The Traditional Way is Right. Mind 104 (414):331-354.
  33. Jonathan Bennett (1995). Index of MIND Vol. 104 Nos. 1-4, 1995. Mind 104:4.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1995). The Act Itself. Oxford University Press.
    In this major new book, the internationally renowned thinker Jonathan Bennett offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human behavior. The Act Itself presents a conceptual analysis of descriptions of behavior on which we base our moral judgements, and shows that this analysis can be used as a means toward getting more control of our thoughts and thus of our lives.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jonathan Bennett (1994). Descartes's Theory of Modality. Philosophical Review 103 (4):639-667.
    Descartes propounded the allegedly "strange", "peculiar", "curious" and "incoherent" doctrine that necessary truths are made true by God's voluntary act. It is generally held that this doctrine must be kept out of sight while other Cartesian topics are being discussed. This paper offers an interpretation of this Cartesian doctrine under which it comes out as reasonable, consistent with the rest of his philosophy, and possible even true. According to this interpretation--which is more respectful of and close to Descartes's text than (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jonathan Bennett (1994). 4 Locke's Philosophy of Mind. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. 89.
  37. Jonathan Bennett (1994). On Translating Locke, Berkeley, and Hume Into English. Teaching Philosophy 17 (3):261-269.
    I have recently been collaborating with my colleague Stewart Thau in teaching a 200-level course on early modern philosophy. The students are given a "Guide to Reading" for each class's reading assignment, along with about six questions on the assignment, one of which is then selected as a mini-quiz in class at the start of the next lecture. Failures and no-shows in the quizzes have an effect on the final grades.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jonathan Bennett (1994). The “Namely” Analysis of the “by”-Locution. Linguistics and Philosophy 17 (1):29 - 51.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jonathan Bennett (1993). Comments on Dennett From a Cautious Ally. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):381-385.
    In these notes, unadorned page numbers under 350 refer to Dennett (1987) - The Intentional Stance, hereafter referred to as Stance - and ones over 495 refer to Dennett (1988) - mostly to material by him but occasionally to remarks of his critics. Since the notes will focus on disagreements, I should say now that I am in Dennett’s camp and am deeply in debt to his work in the philosophy of mind, which I think is wider, deeper, more various (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jonathan Bennett (1993). Negation and Abstention: Two Theories of Allowing. Ethics 104 (1):75-96.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jonathan Bennett (1993). The Necessity of Moral Judgments. Ethics 103 (3):458-472.
    The first chapter of Judith Jarvis Thomson's "The Realm of Rights" includes a defense of moral realism, in which much weight is rested on the idea that some moral judgments are necessarily true. This paper argues that the uncontroversial premise to which Thomson in entitled is that some moral judgments are necessary, which can be understood in a manner that does not bring in truth and does not support realism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Barbara Abbott, Nicholas Asher, Jay Atlas, Kent Bach, Chris Barker, Stephen Barker, Renate Bartsch, Jonathan Bennett, Steven Borr & David Braun (1992). Linguistics Managing Editor. Linguistics and Philosophy 15:679-680.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jim Stone, Ron Amundson, Jonathan Bennett, Joram Graf Haber, Lina Levit Haber, Jack Nass, Bernard H. Baumrin, Sarah W. Emery, Frank B. Dilley, Marilyn Friedman, Christina Sommers & Alan Soble (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (5):87 - 99.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jonathan Bennett (1991). Analysis Without Noise. In R. Bogdan (ed.), Mind and Common Sense. Cambridge University Press.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jonathan Bennett (1991). Folk-Psychological Explanations. In John D. Greenwood (ed.), The Future of Folk Psychology. Cambridge University Press. 176.
  46. Jonathan Bennett (1991). How Do Gestures Succeed. In Ernest LePore (ed.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell. 3--15.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jonathan Bennett (1991). Précis of Events and Their Names. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):625 - 628.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jonathan Bennett (1991). Reply to Reviewers. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):647 - 662.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jonathan Bennett (1991). The Difference Between Right and Left. In. In James Van~Cleve & Robert E. Frederick (eds.), The Philosophy of Right and Left. Kluwer. 97--130.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jonathan Bennett (1990). Spinoza and Teleology: A Reply to Curley. In E. M. Curley & Pierre-François Moreau (eds.). Brill. 53-7.
1 — 50 / 151