155 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Jonathan A. Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Profile: Jonathan Cohen (University of South Carolina)
Profile: Jonathan Cohen (University of California, San Diego)
  1.  35
    Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen (2009). Pushing Moral Buttons: The Interaction Between Personal Force and Intention in Moral Judgment. Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
  2.  43
    Jonathan Cohen (2009). The Red and the Real: An Essay on Color Ontology. Oxford.
    The space of options -- The argument from perceptual variation -- Variation revisited : objections and responses -- Relationism defended : linguistic and mental representation of color -- Relationism defended : ontology -- Relationism defended : phenomenology -- A role functionalist theory of color -- Role functionalism and its relationalist rivals.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  3.  26
    Matthew M. Botvinick, Jonathan D. Cohen & Cameron S. Carter (2004). Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex: An Update. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):539-546.
    One hypothesis concerning the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is that it functions, in part, to signal the occurrence of conflicts in information processing, thereby triggering compensatory adjustments in cognitive control. Since this idea was first proposed, a great deal of relevant empirical evidence has accrued. This evidence has largely corroborated the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, and some very recent work has provided striking new support for the theory. At the same time, other findings have posed specific challenges, especially concerning the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   69 citations  
  4.  14
    Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen (2008). Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment. Cognition 107 (3):1144-1154.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   47 citations  
  5. Robert C. Wilson, Andra Geana, John M. White, Elliot A. Ludvig & Jonathan D. Cohen (2014). Humans Use Directed and Random Exploration to Solve the Explore–Exploit Dilemma. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (6):2074-2081.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  1
    Earl K. Miller & Jonathan D. Cohen (2001). An Integrative Theory of Prefrontal Cortex Function. Annual Review of Neuroscience 24 (1):167-202.
    The prefrontal cortex has long been suspected to play an important role in cognitive control, in the ability to orchestrate thought and action in accordance with internal goals. Its neural basis, however, has remained a mystery. Here, we propose that cognitive control stems from the active maintenance of patterns of activity in the prefrontal cortex that represent goals and the means to achieve them. They provide bias signals to other brain structures whose net effect is to guide the flow of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  7.  68
    Daniel C. Burnston & Jonathan Cohen (2015). Perceptual Integration, Modularity, and Cognitive Penetration. In A. Raftopoulos & J. Zeimbekis (eds.), Cognitive Influences on Perception: Implications for Philosophy of Mind, Epistemology, and Philosophy of Action. Oxford University Press
  8. Matthew M. Botvinick, Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Cameron S. Carter & Jonathan D. Cohen (2001). Conflict Monitoring and Cognitive Control. Psychological Review 108 (3):624-652.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  9. Jonathan Cohen (2004). Color Properties and Color Ascriptions: A Relationalist Manifesto. Philosophical Review 113 (4):451-506.
    Are colors relational or non-relational properties of their bearers? Is red a property that is instantiated by all and only the objects with a certain intrinsic (/non-relational) nature? Or does an object with a particular intrinsic (/non-relational) nature count as red only in virtue of standing in certain relations - for example, only when it looks a certain way to a certain perceiver, or only in certain circumstances of observation? In this paper I shall argue for the view that color (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   36 citations  
  10. Jonathan Cohen (2013). Indexicality and the Puzzle of the Answering Machine. Journal of Philosophy 110 (1):5-32.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11. Craig Callender & Jonathan Cohen (2006). There is No Special Problem About Scientific Representation. Theoria 21 (1):67-85.
    We propose that scientific representation is a special case of a more general notion of representation, and that the relatively well worked-out and plausible theories of the latter are directly applicable to thc scientific special case. Construing scientific representation in this way makes the so-called “problem of scientific representation” look much less interesting than it has seerned to many, and suggests that some of the (hotly contested) debates in the literature are concerned with non-issues.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  12. Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender (2009). A Better Best System Account of Lawhood. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):1 - 34.
    Perhaps the most significant contemporary theory of lawhood is the Best System (/MRL) view on which laws are true generalizations that best systematize knowledge. Our question in this paper will be how best to formulate a theory of this kind. We’ll argue that an acceptable MRL should (i) avoid inter-system comparisons of simplicity, strength, and balance, (ii) make lawhood epistemically accessible, and (iii) allow for laws in the special sciences. Attention to these problems will bring into focus a useful menu (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  13.  29
    Alan G. Sanfey, George Loewenstein, Samuel M. McClure & Jonathan D. Cohen (2006). Neuroeconomics: Cross-Currents in Research on Decision-Making. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):108-116.
  14. Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender (2010). Special Sciences, Conspiracy and the Better Best System Account of Lawhood. Erkenntnis 73 (3):427 - 447.
    An important obstacle to lawhood in the special sciences is the worry that such laws would require metaphysically extravagant conspiracies among fundamental particles. How, short of conspiracy, is this possible? In this paper we'll review a number of strategies that allow for the projectibility of special science generalizations without positing outlandish conspiracies: non-Humean pluralism, classical MRL theories of laws, and Albert and Loewer's theory. After arguing that none of the above fully succeed, we consider the conspiracy problem through the lens (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  15.  78
    Jonathan Cohen & Eliot Michaelson (2013). Indexicality and The Answering Machine Paradox. Philosophy Compass 8 (6):580-592.
    Answering machines and other types of recording devices present prima facie problems for traditional theories of the meaning of indexicals. The present essay explores a range of semantic and pragmatic responses to these issues. Careful attention to the difficulties posed by recordings promises to help enlighten the boundaries between semantics and pragmatics more broadly.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  16.  97
    Jonathan Cohen (2008). Colour Constancy as Counterfactual. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (1):61 – 92.
    There is nothing in this World constant but Inconstancy. [Swift 1711: 258] In this paper I argue that two standard characterizations of colour constancy are inadequate to the phenomenon. This inadequacy matters, since, I contend, philosophical appeals to colour constancy as a way of motivating illumination-independent conceptions of colour turn crucially on the shortcomings of these characterizations. After critically reviewing the standard characterizations, I provide a novel counterfactualist understanding of colour constancy, argue that it avoids difficulties of its traditional rivals, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  17.  15
    Jonathan Cohen (2015). Ecumenicism, Comparability, and Color, Or: How to Have Your Cake and Eat It, Too. Minds and Machines 25 (2):149-175.
    Data about perceptual variation motivate the ecumenicist view that distinct color representations are mutually compatible. On the other hand, data about agreement and disagreement motivate making distinct color representations mutually incompatible. Prima facie, these desiderata appear to conflict. I’ll lay out and assess two strategies for managing the conflict—color relationalism, and the self-locating property theory of color—with the aim of deciding how best to have your cake and eat it, too.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Jonathan D. Cohen, Samuel M. McClure & Yu & J. Angela (2008). Should I Stay or Should I Go? How the Human Brain Manages the Trade-Off Between Exploitation and Exploration. In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. OUP Oxford
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  19.  78
    Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin (2006). True Colours. Analysis 66 (292):335-340.
    (Tye 2006) presents us with the following scenario: John and Jane are both stan- dard human visual perceivers (according to the Ishihara test or the Farnsworth test, for example) viewing the same surface of Munsell chip 527 in standard conditions of visual observation. The surface of the chip looks “true blue” to John (i.e., it looks blue not tinged with any other colour to John), and blue tinged with green to Jane.1 Tye then in effect poses a multiple choice question.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  20. Jonathan Cohen & Aaron Meskin (2006). An Objective Counterfactual Theory of Information. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):333 – 352.
    We offer a novel theory of information that differs from traditional accounts in two respects: (i) it explains information in terms of counterfactuals rather than conditional probabilities, and (ii) it does not make essential reference to doxastic states of subjects, and consequently allows for the sort of objective, reductive explanations of various notions in epistemology and philosophy of mind that many have wanted from an account of information.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  21. Jonathan Cohen & Mohan Matthen (2010). Introduction. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Color Ontology and Color Science. MIT Press
    The Introduction discusses determinables and similarity spaces and ties together the contributions to Color Ontology and Color Science.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  22. Jonathan Cohen (2007). A Relationalist's Guide to Error About Color Perception. Noûs 41 (2):335–353.
    Color relationalism is the view that colors are constituted in terms of relations to perceiving subjects. Among its explanatory virtues, relation- alism provides a satisfying treatment of cases of perceptual variation. But it can seem that relationalists lack resources for saying that a representa- tion of x’s color is erroneous. Surely, though, a theory of color that makes errors of color perception impossible cannot be correct. In this paper I’ll argue that, initial appearances notwithstanding, relationalism contains the resources to account (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  23. Jonathan Cohen & Aaron Meskin (2004). On the Epistemic Value of Photographs. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):197–210.
    Many have held that photographs give us a firmer epistemic connection to the world than do other depictive representations. To take just one example, Bazin famously claimed that “The objective nature of photography confers on it a quality of credibility absent from all other picture-making” ([Bazin, 1967], 14). Unfortunately, while the intuition in question is widely shared, it has remained poorly understood. In this paper we propose to explain the special epistemic status of photographs. We take as our starting place (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  24.  92
    Jonathan Cohen (2010). Color Relationalism and Color Phenomenology. In Bence Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press 13.
    Color relationalism is the view that colors are constituted in terms of relations between subjects and objects. The most historically important form of color relationalism is the classic dispositionalist view according to which, for example red is the disposition to look red to standard observers in standard conditions (mutatis mutandis for other colors).1 However, it has become increasingly apparent in recent years that a commitment to the relationality of colors bears interest that goes beyond dispositionalism (Cohen, 2004; Matthen, 1999, 2001, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  25.  8
    Matthew M. Botvinick & Jonathan D. Cohen (2014). The Computational and Neural Basis of Cognitive Control: Charted Territory and New Frontiers. Cognitive Science 38 (6):1249-1285.
    Cognitive control has long been one of the most active areas of computational modeling work in cognitive science. The focus on computational models as a medium for specifying and developing theory predates the PDP books, and cognitive control was not one of the areas on which they focused. However, the framework they provided has injected work on cognitive control with new energy and new ideas. On the occasion of the books' anniversary, we review computational modeling in the study of cognitive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26. Jonathan Cohen (2006). Color and Perceptual Variation Revisited: Unknown Facts, Alien Modalities, and Perfect Psychosemantics. Dialectica 60 (3):307-319.
    An adequate ontology of color must face the empirical facts about per- ceptual variation. In this paper I begin by reviewing a range of data about perceptual variation, and showing how they tell against color physicalism and motivate color relationalism. Next I consider a series of objections to the argument from perceptual variation, and argue that they are un- persuasive. My conclusion will be that the argument remains a powerful obstacle for color physicalism, and a powerful reason to believe in (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  27.  68
    Jonathan Cohen (2003). Color: A Functionalist Proposal. Philosophical Studies 113 (1):1-42.
    In this paper I propose and defend an account of color that I call color functionalism. I argue that functionalism is a non-traditional species of primary quality theory, and that it accommodates our intuitions about color and the facts of color science better than more widely discussed alternatives.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  28.  16
    Jonathan Cohen (2013). Indexicality and the Puzzle of the Answering Machine. Journal of Philosophy 110 (1):5-32.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29. Jonathan Cohen (2004). Objects, Places, and Perception. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):471-495.
    In Clark (2000), Austen Clark argues convincingly that a widespread view of perception as a complicated kind of feature-extraction is incomplete. He argues that perception has another crucial representational ingredient: it must also involve the representation of "sensory individuals" that exemplify sensorily extracted features. Moreover, he contends, the best way of understanding sensory individuals takes them to be places in space surrounding the perceiver. In this paper, I'll agree with Clark's case for sensory individuals (.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  30. Jonathan Cohen & Shaun Nichols (2010). Colours, Colour Relationalism and the Deliverances of Introspection. Analysis 70 (2):218 - 228.
    An important motivation for relational theories of color is that they resolve apparent conflicts about color: x can, without contradiction, be red relative to S1 and not red relative to S2. Alas, many philosophers claim that the view is incompatible with naive, phenomenally grounded introspection. However, when we presented normal adults with apparent conflicts about color (among other properties), we found that many were open to the relationalist's claim that apparently competing variants can simultaneously be correct. This suggests that, philosophers' (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  98
    Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin (2007). The Truth About 'the Truth About True Blue'. Analysis 67 (294):162–166.
    It can happen that a single surface S, viewed in normal conditions, looks pure blue (“true blue”) to observer John but looks blue tinged with green to a second observer, Jane, even though both are normal in the sense that they pass the standard psychophysical tests for color vision. Tye (2006a) finds this situation prima facie puzzling, and then offers two different “solutions” to the puzzle.1 The first is that at least one observer misrepresents S’s color because, though normal in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  32.  6
    Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Beth A. Keys, Cameron S. Carter, Jonathan D. Cohen, Jeffrey A. Kaye, Jeri S. Janowsky, Stephan F. Taylor, Jerome A. Yesavage & Martin S. Mumenthaler (2001). Context Processing in Older Adults: Evidence for a Theory Relating Cognitive Control to Neurobiology in Healthy Aging. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (4):746.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  33. Jonathan Cohen (2002). The Grand Grand Illusion Illusion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):141-157.
    In recent years, a pair of intriguing phenomena has caused researchers working on vision and visual attention to reevaluate many of their assumptions. These phenomena, which have come to be called change blindness (CB) and inattentional blindness (IB), have led many to the conclusion that ordinary perceivers labor under a ``grand illusion'' concerning perception - an illusion that is..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  34. Jonathan D. Cohen, Kevin Dunbar & James L. McClelland (1990). On the Control of Automatic Processes: A Parallel Distributed Processing Account of the Stroop Effect. Psychological Review 97 (3):332-361.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  35.  75
    Aaron Meskin & Jonathan Cohen (2008). Photographs as Evidence. In Scott Walden (ed.), Photography and Philosophy: Essays on the Pencil of Nature. Blackwell
    Photographs furnish evidence. This is true in both formal and informal contexts. The use of photographs as legal evidence goes back to the very earliest days of photography, and they have been used in American trials since around the time of the Civil War. Photographs may also serve as historical evidence (for example, about the Civil War). And they serve in informal contexts as evidence about all sorts of things, such as what we and our loved ones looked like in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  36.  38
    Jonathan Cohen (2015). Perceptual Constancy. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. 621-639.
    Students of perception have long known that perceptual constancy is an important aspect of our perceptual interaction with the world. Here is a simple example of the phenomenon concerning color perception: there is some ordinary sense in which an unpainted ceramic coffee cup made from a uniform material looks a uniform color when it is viewed under uneven illumination, even though the light reflected by the shaded regions to our eyes is quite different from the light reflected by the unshaded (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  98
    Jonathan Cohen (1950). Mr. Strawson's Analysis of Truth. Analysis 10 (6):136 - 140.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  56
    Jonathan Cohen (2003). Perceptual Variation, Realism, and Relativization, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Variations in Color Vision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):25-26.
    In many cases of variation in color vision, there is no non-arbitrary way of choosing between variants. Byrne and Hilbert insist that there is an unknown standard for choosing, while eliminativists claim that all the variants are erroneous. A better response relativizes colors to perceivers, thereby providing a color realism that avoids the need to choose between variants.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  39.  74
    Jonathan Cohen (2010). Perception and Computation. Philosophical Issues 20 (1):96-124.
    Students of perception have long puzzled over a range of cases in which perception seems to tell us distinct, and in some sense conflicting, things about the world. In the cases at issue, the perceptual system is capable of responding to a single stimulus — say, as manifested in the ways in which subjects sort that stimulus — in different ways. This paper is about these puzzling cases, and about how they should be characterized and accounted for within a general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  87
    Jonathan Cohen (2003). On the Structural Properties of the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):78-95.
    Primary quality theories of color claim that colors are intrinsic, objective, mind-independent properties of external objects — that colors, like size and shape, are examples of the sort of properties moderns such as Boyle and Locke called primary qualities of body.1 Primary quality theories have long been seen as one of the main philosophical options for understanding the nature of color.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41. Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.) (2010). Color Ontology and Color Science. MIT Press.
  42.  97
    P. D. Magnus & Jonathan Cohen (2003). Williamson on Knowledge and Psychological Explanation. Philosophical Studies 116 (1):37-52.
    According to many philosophers, psychological explanation canlegitimately be given in terms of belief and desire, but not in termsof knowledge. To explain why someone does what they do (so the common wisdom holds) you can appeal to what they think or what they want, but not what they know. Timothy Williamson has recently argued against this view. Knowledge, Williamson insists, plays an essential role in ordinary psychological explanation.Williamson's argument works on two fronts.First, he argues against the claim that, unlike knowledge, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43.  66
    Jonathan Cohen (2012). Redness, Reality, and Relationalism. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):351-378.
    In this paper I reply to two sets of criticisms—a first from Joshua Gert, and a second from Keith Allen—of the relationalist view of color developed and defended in my book, The Red and the Real: An Essay on Color Ontology.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  83
    Jonathan Cohen (2010). Sounds and Temporality. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:303-320.
    What is the relationship between sounds and time? More specifically, is there something essentially or distinctively temporal about sounds that distinguishes them from, say, colors, shapes, odors, tastes, or other sensible qualities? And just what might this distinctive relation to time consist in? Apart from their independent interest, these issues have a number of important philosophical repercussions. First, if sounds are temporal in a way that other sensible qualities are not, then this would mean that standard lists of paradigm secondary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45. Jonathan Cohen & Brian McLaughlin (eds.) (2007). Contemporary Debates in the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46.  61
    Daniel Burnston & Jonathan Cohen (2012). Perception of Features and Perception of Objects. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):283-314.
    There is a long and distinguished tradition in philosophy and psychology according to which the mind’s fundamental, foundational connection to the world is made by connecting perceptually to features of objects. On this picture, which we’ll call feature prioritarianism, minds like ours first make contact with the colors, shapes, and sizes of distal items, and then, only on the basis of the representations so obtained, build up representations of the objects that bear these features. The feature priority view maintains, then, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  46
    Jonathan Cohen (2012). Précis of The Red and the Real: An Essay on Color Ontology. Analytic Philosophy 53 (3):288-296.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  91
    P. F. Strawson, H. J. Paton, H. L. A. Hart, Richard Robinson, A. C. Lloyd, R. Rhees, J. L. Spilsbury, Dorothy Emmet, George E. Hughes, D. R. Cousin, Basil Mitchell, Richard Peters, B. A. Farrell, Antony Flew, J. O. Urmson, O. P. Wood & Jonathan Cohen (1951). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 60 (238):265-295.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Rafal Bogacz, Eric Brown, Jeff Moehlis, Philip Holmes & Jonathan D. Cohen (2006). The Physics of Optimal Decision Making: A Formal Analysis of Models of Performance in Two-Alternative Forced-Choice Tasks. Psychological Review 113 (4):700-765.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  50.  62
    Jonathan Cohen (1951). Tense Usage and Propositions. Analysis 11 (4):80 - 87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 155