39 found
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  1. Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole (1995). Body Image and Body Schema in a Deafferented Subject. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (4):369-390.
    In a majority of situations the normal adult maintains posture or moves without consciously monitoring motor activity. Posture and movement are usually close to automatic; they tend to take care of themselves, outside of attentive regard. One's body, in such cases, effaces itself as one is geared into a particular intentional goal. This effacement is possible because of the normal functioning of a body schema. Body schema can be defined as a system of preconscious, subpersonal processes that play a dynamic (...)
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  2.  30
    Shaun Gallagher, Daniel D. Hutto, Jan Slaby & Jonathan Cole (2013). The Brain as Part of an Enactive System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):421-422.
    The notion of an enactive system requires thinking about the brain in a way that is different from the standard computational-representational models. In evolutionary terms, the brain does what it does and is the way that it is, across some scale of variations, because it is part of a living body with hands that can reach and grasp in certain limited ways, eyes structured to focus, an autonomic system, an upright posture, etc. coping with specific kinds of environments, and with (...)
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  3. Jonathan Cole & Henrietta Spalding (2008). The Invisible Smile: Living Without Facial Expression. OUP Oxford.
    We are defined by our faces. They give identity but, equally importantly, reveal our moods and emotions through facial expression. So what happens when the face cannot move? This book is about people who live with Mbius Syndrome, which has as its main feature an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression from birth.
     
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  4.  65
    Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle to have others (...)
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  5.  12
    Jonathan Cole & Jacques Paillard (1995). Living Without Touch and Peripheral Information About Body Position and Movement: Studies with Deafferented Subjects. In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. MIT Press 245--266.
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  6.  79
    Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & David McNeill (2002). Gesture Following Deafferentation: A Phenomenologically Informed Experimental Study. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):49-67.
    Empirical studies of gesture in a subject who has lost proprioception and the sense of touch from the neck down show that specific aspects of gesture remain normal despite abnormal motor processes for instrumental movement. The experiments suggest that gesture, as a linguistic phenomenon, is not reducible to instrumental movement. They also support and extend claims made by Merleau-Ponty concerning the relationship between language and cognition. Gesture, as language, contributes to the accomplishment of thought.
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  7. Jonathan Cole, Natalie Depraz & Shaun Gallagher, Unity and Disunity in Bodily Awareness: Phenomenology and Neuroscience. Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness Workshop.
  8. Shlomo Avineri, Richard Bernstein, Jonathan R. Cole, Hans-Peter Krüger & Alan Ryan (2009). Universities Under Conditions of Duress: Question and Answer Session. Social Research: An International Quarterly 76 (3):959-962.
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  9.  4
    Jonathan Cole (2008). Phenomenology, Neuroscience and Impairment. Abstracta 4 (3):20-33.
  10.  9
    Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole (2011). Dissociation in Self-Narrative. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):149-155.
    We review different analytic approaches to narratives by those with psychopathological conditions, and we suggest that the interpretation of such narratives are complicated by a variety of phenomenological and hermeneutical considerations. We summarize an empirical study of narrative distance in narratives by non-pathological subjects, and discuss how the results can be interpreted in two different ways with regard to the issue of dissociation.
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  11.  2
    Harriet Zuckerman, Jonathan R. Cole & John T. Bruer (1994). The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (4):609.
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  12.  3
    Jonathan Cole (1999). On'Being Faceless'. In Jonathan Shear & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Models of the Self. Imprint Academic 301.
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  13.  22
    Jonathan Cole & Oliver Sacks (2000). On the Immunity Principle: A View From a Robot. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167.
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  14.  7
    Jonathan Cole (2001). Empathy Needs a Face. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):5-7.
    The importance of the face is best understood, it is suggested, from the effects of visible facial difference in people. Their experience reflects the ways in which the face may be necessary for the interpersonal relatedness underlying such 'sharing' mind states as empathy. It is proposed that the face evolved as a result of several evolutionary pressures but that it is well placed to assume the role of an embodied representation of the increasingly refined inner states of mind that developed (...)
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  15.  95
    Oliver Sacks, Jonathan Cole & Ian Waterman (2000). On the Immunity Principle: A View From a Robot. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167.
    Preprint of Cole, Sacks, and Waterman. 2000. "On the immunity principle: A view from a robot." Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (5): 167, a response to Shaun Gallagher, S. 2000. "Philosophical conceptions of the self: implications for cognitive science," Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (1):14-21. Also see Shaun Gallagher, Reply to Cole, Sacks, and Waterman Trends in Cognitive Science 4, No. 5 (2000): 167-68.
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  16.  15
    Jonathan Cole & Barbara Montero (2007). Affective Proprioception. Janus Head 9 (2):299-317.
    Proprioception has been considered, within neuroscience, in the context of the control of movement. Here we discuss a possible second role for this ‘sixth sense’, pleasure in and of movement, homologous with the recently described affective touch. We speculate on its evolution and place in human society and suggest that pleasure in movement may depend not on feedback but also on harmony between intention and action. Examples come from expert movers, dancers and sportsmen, and from those without proprioception due to (...)
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  17.  7
    Jonathan Cole (1997). On 'Being Faceless': Selfhood and Facial Embodiment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):5-6.
    For most people a sense of self includes an embodied component: when describing our selves we describe those aspects of our physical bodies which can be easily codified: height, hair colour, sex, eye colour. Even when we consider ourselves we tend not to consider our intellectual cognitive characteristics but our describable anatomy. Wittgenstein's dictum, ‘the human body is the best picture of the human soul’, is relevant here but I would like to go further: the body-part we feel most embodied (...)
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  18.  24
    David McNeill, Susan Duncan, Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & Bennett Bertenthal (2010). Growth Points From the Very Beginning. In M. Arbib D. Bickerton (ed.), The Emergence of Protolanguage: Holophrasis Vs Compositionality. John Benjamins 117-132.
    Did protolanguage users use discrete words that referred to objects, actions, locations, etc., and then, at some point, combine them; or on the contrary did they have words that globally indexed whole semantic complexes, and then come to divide them? Our answer is: early humans were forming language units consisting of global and discrete dimensions of semiosis in dynamic opposition. These units of thinking-for-speaking, or ‘growth points’ (GPs) were, jointly, analog imagery (visuo-spatio-motoric) and categorically-contrastive (-emic) linguistic encodings. This discrete-global duality (...)
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  19. Jonathan R. Cole (2009). Defending Academic Freedom and Free Inquiry. Social Research: An International Quarterly 76 (3):811-844.
    This paper focuses our attention on a few principles that guide great universities. I want to suggest that the United States has not distinguished itself particularly well in preventing episodes of repression and attempts to silence dissent at universities, nor has it produced an extraordinary number of courageous leaders over the past seventy-five years who have come forward to defend the principles of academic freedom. While the US has never reached the level of repression that Germany felt in the 1930s, (...)
     
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  20.  39
    David McNeill, Bennett Bertenthal, Jonathan Cole & Shaun Gallagher (2005). Gesture-First, but No Gestures? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):138-139.
    Although Arbib's extension of the mirror-system hypothesis neatly sidesteps one problem with the “gesture-first” theory of language origins, it overlooks the importance of gestures that occur in current-day human linguistic performance, and this lands it with another problem. We argue that, instead of gesture-first, a system of combined vocalization and gestures would have been a more natural evolutionary unit.
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  21.  22
    Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  22.  56
    Jonathan Cole (2007). The Phenomenology of Agency and Intention in the Face of Paralysis and Insentience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):309-325.
    Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord injury, sensory neuronopathy syndrome or motor stroke), or with experimental paralysis or sensory loss. The differing phenomenology of these is explored and their effects on intention and agency discussed. It (...)
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  23.  4
    Jonathan Cole (2000). Relations Between the Face and the Self as Revealed by Neurological Loss: The Subjective Experience of Facial Difference. Social Research 67.
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  24.  4
    Harriet Zuckerman & Jonathan R. Cole (1975). Women in American Science. Minerva 13 (1):82-102.
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  25.  6
    Jonathan Cole, Marcelo Dascal, Shaun Gallagher & Christopher D. Frith (2010). Concluding Discussion. Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):553-559.
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  26.  6
    Andrew J. Goudie, Matthew J. Gullo, Abigail K. Rose, Paul Christiansen, Jonathan C. Cole, Matt Field & Harry Sumnall (2011). Nonaddictive Instrumental Drug Use: Theoretical Strengths and Weaknesses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):314-315.
    The potential to instrumentalize drug use based upon the detection of very many different drug states undoubtedly exists, and such states may play a role in psychiatric and many other drug uses. Nevertheless, nonaddictive drug use is potentially more parsimoniously explained in terms of sensation seeking/impulsivity and drug expectations. Cultural factors also play a major role in nonaddictive drug use.
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  27.  8
    Jonathan Cole (2000). Living with Difficulties of Facial Processing: Some Ontological Consequences of Clinical Facial Problems. Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):237-260.
    The present paper considers the processing of facial information from a personal and narrative aspect, attempting to address the effects that deficits in such processing have on people¿s perceptions of themselves and of others. The approach adopted has been a narrative and mainly subjective one, entering the experience of several subjects with facial problems to tease out the interactions between their facial problems and their relations with others. The subjects are those with blindness, either congenital or acquired, autism, Moebius syndrome (...)
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  28.  16
    Andrew James Goudie & Jonathan Charles Cole (2004). Hallucinations and Antipsychotics: The Role of the 5-HT2A Receptor. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):795-796.
    Behrendt & Young's (B&Y's) novel “unifying model” of hallucinations, although comprehensive, fails to incorporate research into the possible role of 5-HT2A receptors in the mode of action of novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs (which treat hallucinations effectively), and into the role of such receptors, which are located in thalamocortical circuits, in mediating drug-induced hallucinations.
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  29.  22
    Jonathan Cole (2000). "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  30.  5
    Shaun Gallagher, Jonathan Cole & David McNeill (2002). Social Cognition and Primacy of Movement Revisited. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):155-156.
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  31.  4
    Jonathan Cole (2010). The Origin of Consciousness: The Background to the Debate. Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):481-495.
    This paper introduces the background to the debate addressed by the papers of this Special Issue of Pragmatics & Cognition. Starting with a definition of consciousness it traces some ways in which the term is applied; from clinical medicine, where it relates somewhat crudely to responsiveness to external stimuli, to more cognitive and philosophical aspects such as higher order consciousness and its content. It then discusses the relation of consciousness to brain anatomy, the neural correlates of consciousness, and (...)
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  32.  3
    Jonathan Cole (2003). Review of “Understanding Consciousness: Its Function and Brain Processes” by Gerd Sommerhoff. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):394-404.
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  33.  1
    Jonathan Cole (2006). Shaun Gallagher,How the Body Shapes the Mind. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):192-196.
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  34. Akeel Bilgrami & Jonathan R. Cole (eds.) (2015). Who's Afraid of Academic Freedom? Cup.
    In these seventeen essays, distinguished senior scholars discuss the conceptual issues surrounding the idea of freedom of inquiry and scrutinize a variety of obstacles to such inquiry that they have encountered in their personal and professional experience. Their discussion of threats to freedom traverses a wide disciplinary and institutional, political and economic range covering specific restrictions linked to speech codes, the interests of donors, institutional review board licensing, political pressure groups, and government policy, as well as phenomena of high generality, (...)
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  35. Jonathan Cole, Marcelo Dascal, Shaun Gallagher & Christopher Frith (2010). Concluding Discussion. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):553-559.
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  36. Jonathan Cole (2016). Losing Touch: A Man Without His Body. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What is like to live without touch or movement/position sense? The only way to understand the importance of these senses, so familiar we cannot imagine their absence, is to ask someone in that position. Ian Waterman lost them below the neck over forty years ago, though pain and temperature perception and his peripheral movement nerves were unaffected. Without proprioceptive feedback and touch the movement brain was disabled. Completely unable to move, he felt disembodied and frightened. Then, slowly, he taught himself (...)
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  37. Jonathan Cole (2000). Living with Difficulties of Facial Processing: Some Ontological Consequences of Clinical Facial Problems. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):237-260.
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  38. Jonathan Cole (2004). Tetraplegia and Self-Consciousness. In Dan Zahavi, T. Grunbaum & Josef Parnas (eds.), The Structure and Development of Self-Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. John Benjamins
     
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  39. Jonathan Cole (2010). The Origin of Consciousness: The Background to the Debate. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 18 (3):481-495.
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