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  1. Jonathan Hill (forthcoming). Maximum Effect, Minimum Outlay: The Coherence of Leibniz's Fruitfulness Criterion. History of Philosophy Quarterly.
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  2. Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.) (2013). The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. OUP Oxford.
    This volume focuses on the authorial voice in antiquity, exploring the different ways in which authors presented and projected various personas. In particular, it questions authority and ascription in relation to the authorial voice, and considers how later readers and authors may have understood the authority of a text's author.
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  3. Jonathan Hill (2012). Aquinas and the Unity of Christ: A Defence of Compositionalism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (2):117-135.
    Thomas Aquinas is often thought to present a compositionalist model of the incarnation, according to which Christ is a composite of a divine nature and a human nature, understood as concrete particulars. But he sometimes seems to hedge away from this model when insisting on the unity of Christ. I argue that if we interpret some of his texts on the assumption of straightforward compositionalism, we can construct a defence of Christ’s unity within that context. This defence involves the claim (...)
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  4. Jonathan Hill (2012). Incarnation, Timelessness, and Exaltation. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):3-29.
    Christian tradition holds not simply that, in Christ, God became human, but that at the end of his earthly career Christ became exalted (possessing andexercising the divine attributes such as omnipotence and omniscience), and yet remained perpetually human. In this paper I consider several models ofthe incarnation in the light of these requirements. In particular, I contrast models that adopt a temporalist understanding of divine eternity with those that adopt an atemporalist one. I conclude that temporalist models struggle to accommodate (...)
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  5. Jonathan Hill (2011). Berkeley's Missing Argument: The Sceptical Attack on Intentionality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):47-77.
    Berkeley argues that our ideas cannot represent external objects, because only an idea can resemble an idea. But he does not offer any argument for the claim that an idea can represent only what it resembles - a premise essential to his argument. I argue that this gap can be both historically explained and filled by examining the debates between Cartesians and sceptics in the late seventeenth century. Descartes held that representation involves two relations between an idea and its object (...)
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  6. Jonathan Hill (2011). Introduction. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.) (2011). The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford University Press, USA.
    This book offers original essays by leading philosophers of religion representing these new approaches to theological problems such as incarnation.
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  8. Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):27-48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called “compositional models” of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is identical with (...)
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  9. Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1-2):27 - 48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called "compositional models" of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is identical with (...)
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  10. Jonathan Hill (2009). Gregory of Nyssa, Material Substance and Berkeleyan Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):653-683.
  11. Jonathan Hill (2009). Probabilism Today: Permissibility and Multi-Account Ethics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):235-250.
    In ethics, ?probabilism? refers to a position defended by a number of Catholic theologians, mainly in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They held that, when one is uncertain which of a range of actions is the right one to perform, it is permissible to perform any which has a good chance of being the right one?even if there is another which has a better chance. This paper considers the value of this position from the viewpoint of modern ethical philosophy. The (...)
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  12. Jonathan Hill (2008). Leibniz, Relations, and Rewriting Projects. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (2):115 - 135.
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  13. Jonathan Hill (2008). Modeling the Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 20 (1/2):99-128.
    What metaphysics can plausibly back up the claim that God became incarnate? In this essay we investigate the main kinds of models of incarnation that have been historically proposed. We highlight the philosophical assumptions in each model, and on this basis offernovel ways of grouping them as metaphysical rather than doctrinal positions. We examine strengths and weaknesses of the models,and argue that ‘composition models’ offer the most promising way forward to account for the pivotal Christian belief that, in Christ,true divinity (...)
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  14. Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (2008). Modeling the Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 20 (1-2):99 - 128.
    What metaphysics can plausibly back up the claim that God became incarnate? In this essay we investigate the main kinds of models of incarnation that have been historically proposed. We highlight the philosophical assumptions in each model, and on this basis offer novel ways of grouping them as metaphysical rather than doctrinal positions. We examine strengths and weaknesses of the models, and argue that ’composition models’ offer the most promising way forward to account for the pivotal Christian belief that, in (...)
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  15. Jonathan Hill (2007). The Big Questions. Lion.
     
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  16. Jonathan Hill & Derek Bolton (1997). Reply to" Reasons and Causes in Philosophy and Psychopathology". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):319-322.
  17. Jonathan Hill (1992). International Corporations in the English Courts. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 12 (1):135-148.
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  18. Jonathan Hill (1989). Comparative Law, Law Reform and Legal Theory. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 9 (1):101-115.
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  19. Jonathan Hill (1986). Litigation and Negligence: A Comparative Study. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 6 (2):183-218.
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