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Jonathan J. Sanford [13]Jonathan James Sanford [1]
  1. Jonathan J. Sanford (2013). Rethinking Virtue Ethics. By Michael Winter. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):216-218.
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  2. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
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  3. Jonathan J. Sanford (2011). Reading Anselm's Proslogion. International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):113-115.
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  4. Jonathan J. Sanford (2010). Are You Man Enough? Aristotle and Courage. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):431-445.
    There are four features to Aristotle’s account of courage that appear peculiar when compared to our own intuitions about this virtue: (1) his account of courage seems not, on its surface, to fit a eudaimonist model, (2) courage is restricted to a surprisingly small number of actions, (3) this restriction, among other things, excludes women and non-combatant men from ever exercising this virtue, and (4) courage is counted as virtuous because of its nobility and beauty. In this paper I explore (...)
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  5. Jonathan J. Sanford (2009). Confronting Aristotle's Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):107-109.
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  6. Jonathan J. Sanford (2007). Deadly Vices. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):162-164.
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  7. Jonathan J. Sanford (2006). Aristotle’s Divided Mind: Some Thoughts on Intellectual Virtue and Aristotle’s Occasional Dualism. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:77-90.
    In this paper I focus on a few of the passages in the Nicomachean Ethics that challenge the standard hylomorphic interpretation of Aristotle’s anthropology. I proceed by reflecting on the manner in which Aristotle’s two ways of characterizing the human person follow from his accounts of the two most important intellectual virtues, phronesis and sophia. I attempt to argue for the following three points: first, that Aristotle’s presentation of a divided mind is the result of his consistency rather than inconsistency; (...)
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  8. Jonathan J. Sanford (2006). Aristotle's Divided Mind. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:77-90.
    In this paper I focus on a few of the passages in the Nicomachean Ethics that challenge the standard hylomorphic interpretation of Aristotle’s anthropology. I proceed by reflecting on the manner in which Aristotle’s two ways of characterizing the human person follow from his accounts of the two most important intellectual virtues, phronesis and sophia. I attempt to argue for the following three points: first, that Aristotle’s presentation of a divided mind is the result of his consistency rather than inconsistency; (...)
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  9. Jonathan J. Sanford (2005). Scheler Versus Scheler. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):145-161.
    Scheler’s theory of the person is at the center of his philosophy and one of the most celebrated of his achievements. It is somewhat surprising, then, that a straightforward and sufficient account of the person is missing from his works, an omission felt most keenly in that work which is in large measure dedicated to forging a new personalism: The Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values. In his explicit accounts of what a person is, Scheler stresses its spirituality (...)
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  10. Jonathan J. Sanford (2004). Review of “Teleology and the Norms of Nature”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):35.
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  11. Jonathan J. Sanford (2003). Review of “Raskolnikov's Rebirth”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 4 (1):7.
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  12. Jonathan J. Sanford (2002). Review of “Aristotle's Ethics”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 3 (1):4.
    Bostock’s Aristotle’s Ethics is a commentary on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Although there are other ethical writings within the Aristotelian corpus, referring to the Nicomachean Ethics as Aristotle’s Ethics seems warranted: the Nicomachean Ethics has long been regarded as Aristotle’s most mature ethical work, and it is certainly his most thorough one. Bostock’s commentary is of interest as an interpretation and as a critical appraisal of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. In what follows I discuss Bostock’s general assessment of the Nicomachean Ethics , (...)
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  13. Jonathan J. Sanford (2002). Scheler on Feeling and Values. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:165-181.
    Max Scheler argues that there is much to learn about reality through faculties that lie beyond the boundary of reason. In his Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values, Scheler explores values (Werte), awareness of which depends primarily on affective receptivity rather than rational perceptionof the world. This essay explores the possibility of affective insight in light of Scheler’s analysis of values. Scheler’s notion of values as moral facts is first examined, next consideration is given to how we learn (...)
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