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Profile: Jonathan Jacobs (University of York)
Profile: Jonathan A. Jacobs
Profile: Jonathan D. Jacobs (Saint Louis University)
  1. Jonathan D. Jacobs, A Powers Theory of Causation.
    In this paper, my central aim is to defend the Powers Theory of causation, according to which causation is the exercise of a power (or manifestation of a disposition). I will do so by, first, presenting a recent version of the Powers Theory, that of Mumford (Forthcoming). Second, I will raise an objection to Mumford’s account. Third, I will offer a revised version that avoids the objection. And, fourth, I will end by briefly comparing the proposed Powers Theory with the (...)
     
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  2. Jonathan Jacobs (ed.) (forthcoming). Putting Powers to Work: Causal Powers in Contemporary Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
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  3. Jonathan Jacobs (2015). Cultural Renewal: Restoring the Liberal and Fine Arts by Authur Pontynen. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 68 (3):673-675.
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  4. Jonathan Jacobs (2013). “Forgiveness and Perfection,”. In David Konstan Charles Grisowld (ed.), Ancient Forgiveness. Cambridge University Press.
    A study of the ways Maimonides and Aquinas both borrow from Aristotle and depart from him, in regard to the issue of forgiveness. The paper explicates moral-psychological issues and normative issues, connecting them to the perfectionism of the philosophical anthropology shared by the three thinkers. The theistic commitments of Maimonides and Aquinas ground important departures from Aristotle regarding the possibility of moral change and regarding moral relations between persons.
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  5. Jonathan Jacobs (2013). Note From the Editor. Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (1):19-19.
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  6. Jonathan Jacobs (2013). The Liberal Polity, Criminal Sanction, and Civil Society. Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):1-16.
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  7. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2013). Actuality, Possibility, and Worlds. By Alexander R. Pruss. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):799 - 802.
  8. Jonathan D. Jacobs & Timothy O'Connor (2013). Agent Causation in a Neo-Aristotelian Metaphysics. In Sophie C. Gibb & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
  9. Jonathan D. Jacobs & Timothy O'Connor (2013). Neo-Aristotelian Metaphysics. In Sophie C. Gibb & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Jonathan Jacobs (2012). Introduction to Special Issue. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice 11 (3):203-205.
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  11. Jonathan Jacobs (2012). Maimonides. In J. Feiser & B. Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Jonathan Jacobs (ed.) (2012). Reason, Religion, and Natural Law: From Plato to Spinoza. Oxford University Press.
    A collection of new papers by ten philosophers exploring relations between conceptions of natural law and theism, ranging from Plato to the early modern period. Rather than defending a a specific view of natural law, the papers explicate the complex texture of the relations between the diverse conceptions of natural law and diverse conceptions of theism and its significance for moral and political thought.
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  13. Jonathan Jacobs (2012). Theory, Practice, and Specialization: The Case for the Humanities. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice 11 (3):206-223.
    Humanistic studies cultivate types of conceptual fluency and modes of awareness important to thought concerning values. Not all knowledge is scientific knowledge. There is genuine comprehension of some valuative matters – they are not all to be interpreted in expressive or subjective terms. Education in the humanities can encourage value-relevant types of discernment, awareness, and articulateness in uniquely effective ways. Though important kinds of thought concerning values may lack formal, theoretical elaboration they involve genuine standards of intellectual responsibility. Engagement with (...)
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  14. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2012). A Note From the Editor. Modern Schoolman 89 (1-2):1-1.
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  15. Jonathan Jacobs (2011). Criminal Justice and the Liberal Polity. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (2):173-191.
    There are several reasonable conceptions of liberalism. A liberal polity can survive a measure of disagreement over just what constitutes liberalism. In part, this is because of the way a liberal order makes possible a dynamic, heterogeneous civil society and how that, in turn, can supply participants with reasons to support a liberal political order. Despite the different conceptions of justice associated with different conceptions of liberalism, there are reasons to distinguish the normative focus of criminal justice from other aspects (...)
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  16. Jonathan Jacobs (ed.) (2011). Judaic Sources & Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press.
    A collection of ten new papers by ten authors, exploring respects in which there are Judaic sources for important (and often contested) Western moral and political ideas and ideals. It focuses on distinctively Judaic roots of the so-called 'Judeo-Christian tradition.'.
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  17. Jonathan Jacobs (2011). Saadia Gaon. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 1171--1173.
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  18. Jonathan A. Jacobs (ed.) (2011). Judaic Sources and Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in this volume bring into relief the distinctly Judaic origins of many of them and explicate how they remain valuable resources for moral and ...
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  19. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2011). Tradition, Rationality, and Moral Life : Medieval Judaism's Insight. In , Judaic Sources and Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press. 127.
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  20. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2011). Powerful Qualities, Not Pure Powers. The Monist 94 (1):81-102.
    I explore two accounts of properties within a dispositional essentialist (or causal powers) framework, the pure powers view and the powerful qualities view. I first attempt to clarify precisely what the pure powers view is, and then raise objections to it. I then present the powerful qualities view and, in order to avoid a common misconception, offer a restatement of it that I shall call the truthmaker view. I end by briefly defending the truthmaker view against objections.
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  21. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. Oup Oxford.
    A detailed study of the moral philosophy of medieval Jewish thinkers Saadia Gaon, Bahya ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. Jon Jacobs emphasizes their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with contemporary moral philosophy.
     
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  22. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). The Epistemology of Moral Tradition: A Defense of a Maimonidean Thesis. Review of Metaphysics 64 (1):55-74.
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  23. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). The Epistemology of Moral Tradition. Review of Metaphysics 64 (1):55-74.
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  24. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: [Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides]. Oxford University Press.
    Jon Jacobs emphasises their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with ...
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  25. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). “Torah and Political Power: Judaism and the Liberal Polity. Trumah.
    Discusses the respects in which religiously grounded considerations can have an appropriate---even important--role in the public and political discourse of a liberal polity. Examines the role tradition can have in enabling people to attain a reasoned justification for moral ideas and ideals, i.e., tradition is not always an impediment to universally valid or objective considerations. Also, discusses respects in which modern liberalism owes an important debt to religious ideas.
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  26. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2010). A Powers Theory of Modality: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Reject Possible Worlds. Philosophical Studies 151 (2):227-248.
    Possible worlds, concrete or abstract as you like, are irrelevant to the truthmakers for modality—or so I shall argue in this paper. First, I present the neo-Humean picture of modality, and explain why those who accept it deny a common sense view of modality. Second, I present what I take to be the most pressing objection to the neo-Humean account, one that, I argue, applies equally well to any theory that grounds modality in possible worlds. Third, I present an alternative, (...)
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  27. Jonathan D. Jacobs & Timothy O'Connor (2010). Emergent Individuals and the Resurrection. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2).
    We present an original emergent individuals view of human persons, on which persons are substantial biological unities that exemplify metaphysically emergent mental states. We argue that this view allows for a coherent model of identity-preserving resurrection from the dead consistent with orthodox Christian doctrine, one that improves upon alternatives accounts recently proposed by a number of authors. Our model is a variant of the “falling elevator” model advanced by Dean Zimmerman that, unlike Zimmerman’s, does not require a closest continuer account (...)
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  28. Timothy O'Connor & Jonathan D. Jacobs (2010). Emergent Individuals and the Resurrection. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2):69 - 88.
    We present an original ’emergent individuals’ view of human persons, on which persons are substantial biological unities that exemplify metaphysically emergent mental states. We argue that this view allows for a coherent model of identity-preserving resurrection from the dead consistent with orthodox Christian doctrine, one that improves upon alternatives accounts recently proposed by a number of authors. Our model is a variant of the "falling elevator" model advanced by Dean Zimmerman that, unlike Zimmerman’s, does not require a closest continuer account (...)
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  29. Jonathan Jacobs (2009). Hume and Smith on the Moral Psychology of Market Relations, Practical Wisdom, and the Liberal Political Order. Reason Papers 31:63-77.
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  30. Jonathan Jacobs (2009). Judaism and Natural Law. Heythrop Journal 50 (6):930-947.
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  31. Jonathan Jacobs (2009). Paul Bloomfield, Ed.'s Morality and Self-Interest. [REVIEW] Reason Papers 31:171-174.
     
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  32. Jonathan Jacobs (2009). The Humanities and the Recovery of the Real World. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice 8 (1):26-40.
    This article identifies a common intellectual project of the disciplines that constitute the Humanities. It does not define the humanities but characterizes some of the main features of the distinctive and essential kind of learning uniquely attainable by their study. The humanities enable us to attain an understanding of normativity in the broadest sense; humanistic study leads to a textured, penetrating comprehension of diverse valuative matters and concerns. Moreover, study in the humanities enables us to recognize and appreciate valuative realism (...)
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  33. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2009). An Eastern Orthodox Conception of Theosis and Human Nature. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):615-627.
    Though foreign—and perhaps shocking—to many in the west, the doctrine of theosis is central in the theology and practice of Eastern Orthodoxy. Theosis is “the ultimate goal of human existence”1 and indeed is “a way of summing up the purpose of creation”:2 That God will unite himself to all of creation with humanity at the focal point. What are human persons, that they might be united to God? That is the question I explore in this paper. In particular, I explore (...)
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  34. Jonathan Jacobs (2008). Divine Command Ethics: Jewish and Christian Perspectives. By Michael J. Harris. Heythrop Journal 49 (3):516–517.
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  35. Jonathan Jacobs (2008). Deadly Vices - by Gabrielle Taylor. Philosophical Books 49 (2):182-184.
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  36. Jonathan Jacobs (2008). Maimonides' Guide for the Perplexed: Science and Salvation (Review). Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 407-410.
  37. Jonathan Jacobs (2008). The Cage: Must, Should, and Ought From Is. By David Weissman. Metaphilosophy 39 (3):422–427.
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  38. Jonathan Jacobs (2007). Virtuous Liaisons: Care, Love, Sex, and Virtue Ethics. Social Theory and Practice 33 (2):345-352.
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  39. Jonathan Jacobs (2007). Character, Liability, and Morally Unreachable Agents. Criminal Justice Ethics 26 (2):16-28.
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  40. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2007). Causal Powers: A Neo-Aristotelian Metaphysic. Dissertation, Indiana University
    Causal powers, say, an electron’s power to repel other electrons, are had in virtue of having properties. Electrons repel other electrons because they are negatively charged. One’s views about causal powers are shaped by—and shape—one’s views concerning properties, causation, laws of nature and modality. It is no surprise, then, that views about the nature of causal powers are generally embedded into larger, more systematic, metaphysical pictures of the world. This dissertation is an exploration of three systematic metaphysics, Neo-Humeanism, Nomicism and (...)
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  41. Jonathan Jacobs (2003). Sabina Lovibond, Ethical Formation Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (2):121-123.
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  42. Jonathan Jacobs (2003). Some Tensions Between Autonomy and Self-Governance. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):221-244.
    The notions of autonomy and self-governance each capture something crucial about the moral dimensions of agents and actions. These notions are central to the ways in which we conceptualize ourselves and others. The concept of autonomy is especially crucial to understanding the distinct status of moral agents. For its part, self-governance has a significant relation to the evaluation of agents as individuals with particular characters, leading particular sorts of lives, and performing particular actions. Neither notion—autonomy nor self-governance—fully assimilates or dominates (...)
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  43. Timothy O'Connor & Jonathan D. Jacobs (2003). Emergent Individuals. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):540-555.
    We explain the thesis that human mental states are ontologically emergent aspects of a fundamentally biological organism. We then explore the consequences of this thesis for the identity of a human person over time. As these consequences are not obviously independent of one's general ontology of objects and their properties, we consider four such accounts: transcendent universals, kind-Aristotelianism, immanent universals, and tropes. We suggest there are reasons for emergentists to favor the latter two accounts. We then argue that within such (...)
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  44. Jonathan Jacobs (2002). Aristotle and Maimonides. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (1):145-163.
    Maimonides uses Aristotelian philosophical idiom to articulate his moral philosophy, but there are fundamental differences between his and Aristotle’s conceptions of moral psychology and the nature of the moral agent. The Maimonidean conception of volition and its role in repentance and ethical self-correction are quite un-Aristotelian. The relation between this capacity to alter one’s character and the accessibility of ethical requirements given in the Law is explored. This relation helps explain why for Maimonides practical wisdom is not recognized as a (...)
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  45. Jonathan Jacobs (2002). A Contest of Wills. [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 3 (2):329 - 337.
    Jonathan Jacobs reviews The Contested Legacy of Ayn Rand, in which David Kelley responds to Objectivists who refuse to dialogue with libertarians, and examines the debate among Objectivists over the interpretation of Rand's thinking. Kelley argues that Rand presents crucial insights and claims and that these need to be developed and elaborated and not viewed as a fixed doctrine. Jacobs focuses on where Kelley situates himself among Objectivists, and raises critical concerns about the effectiveness with which Rand's philosophy is articulated (...)
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  46. Jonathan Jacobs (2002). Sabina Lovibond, Ethical Formation. Philosophical Inquiry 24 (3-4):146-147.
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  47. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2002). Dimensions of Moral Theory: An Introduction to Metaethics and Moral Psychology. Blackwell Pub..
    This volume formulates these issues of moral epistemology, the metaphysics of moral value, and moral motivation in a clear and rigorous but non-technical manner ...
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  48. Jonathan Jacobs (2001). Metaethics and Teleology. Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):41 - 55.
  49. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2001). Choosing Character: Responsibility for Virtue and Vice. Cornell University Press.
    Jacobs' interpretation is developed in contrast to the overlooked work of Maimonides, who also used Aristotelian resources but argued for the possibility of ...
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  50. Jonathan Jacobs (2000). Theism, Blame and Perfection. Heythrop Journal 41 (2):141–153.
    Blame and also punishment do not reach many agents in the sense that many agents are not motivated to ethically self‐correct, and in fact, may be worsened by these practices. The main reasons agents may not be reached by them are that the agent's second nature may make inaccessible to him a sound appreciation of ethical considerations, and the fixity of mature character may make ethical self‐correction practically impossible. Still, when they are ethically rationalized, blame and punishment seem to be (...)
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