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  1. Alexandra E. Heaton, Suzanne J. Meldrum, Jonathan K. Foster, Susan L. Prescott & Karen Simmer (2013). Does Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation in Term Infants Enhance Neurocognitive Functioning in Infancy? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  2. Jonathan K. Foster (2008). Memory: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.
    Why do we remember events from our childhood as if they happened yesterday, but not what we did last week? Why does our memory seem to work well sometimes and not others? What happens when it goes wrong? Can memory be improved or manipulated, by psychological techniques or even 'brain implants'? How does memory grow and change as we age? And what of so-called 'recovered' memories? -/- This book brings together the latest research in neuroscience and psychology, and weaves in (...)
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  3. Jonathan K. Foster & Andrew C. Wilson (2005). Sleep and Memory: Definitions, Terminology, Models, and Predictions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):71-72.
    In this target article, Walker seeks to clarify the current state of knowledge regarding sleep and memory. Walker's review represents an impressively heuristic attempt to synthesize the relevant literature. In this commentary, we question the focus on procedural memory and the use of the term “consolidation,” and we consider the extent to which empirically testable predictions can be derived from Walker's model.
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  4. Jonathan K. Foster (2003). Thoughts From the Long-Term Memory Chair. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):734-735.
    With reference to Ruchkins et al.'s framework, this commentary briefly considers the history of working memory, and whether, heuristically, this is a useful concept. A neuropsychologically motivated critique is offered, specifically with regard to the recent trend for working-memory researchers to conceptualise this capacity more as a process than as a set of distinct task-specific stores.
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  5. Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster (2002). The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness? Psyche 8 (2).
  6. Jonathan K. Foster (2001). Cantor Coding and Chaotic Itinerancy: Relevance for Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampus? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):815-816.
    This commentary provides a critique of Tsuda's target article, focusing on the hippocampus and episodic long-term memory. More specifically, the relevance of Cantor coding and chaotic itinerancy for long-term memory functioning is considered, given what we know about the involvement of the hippocampus in the mediation of long-term episodic memory (based on empirical neuroimaging studies and investigations of brain-damaged amnesic patients).
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  7. Jonathan K. Foster (2000). A Multidimensional Approach to the Mind-Brain: Behaviour Versus Schemata Versus Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):540-540.
    Arbib, Érdi, and Szentágothai's book seeks to present a multidisciplinary, multistrategied approach to the study of the mind-brain, encompassing structural, functional, and dynamic perspectives. However, the articulated framework is somewhat underspecified at the cognitive level. The representational level of analysis will need to be fleshed out if the explanatory potential of Arbib et al.'s framework is to be fulfilled.
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  8. Jonathan K. Foster (1999). Hippocampus, Recognition, and Recall: A New Twist on Some Old Data? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):449-450.
    This commentary attempts to reconcile the predictions of Aggleton & Brown's theoretical framework with previous findings obtained from experimental tests of laboratory animals with selective hippocampal lesions. Adopting a convergent operations approach, the predictions of the model are also related to human neuroimaging data and to other complementary research perspectives (cognitive, computational, psychopharmacological).
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  9. Jonathan K. Foster (1997). The “Locality Assumption”: Lessons From History and Neuroscience? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):518-519.
    This commentary seeks to place Farah's (1994) arguments in the historical context of ideas about mind-brain relationships. It further seeks to draw a conceptual parallel between the issues considered by Farah in her target article and questions which have concerned neuroscientists since the nineteenth century regarding the functional organization of the brain. Specific reference is made to the relationship between use of the concept of in cognitive neuropsychology and use of the concept of in neuroscience.
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