Search results for 'Jonathan Power' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Nina Power (2009). Axel Honneth, Reification: A New Look at an Old Idea, with Judith Butler, Raymond Geuss and Jonathan Lear. Radical Philosophy 154:54.score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jonathan Power (2003). Do We Need to Make War on Behalf of Human Rights? Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Truth Or Power (2003). He Main Thesis for Which I Intend to Argue is That There is an Exclusi-T Ve Disjunction Between Two Options for the Foundations of Morality: There is Truth or There is the Exercise of Power. 1 In Other Words, the Deni. In P. Schaber & R. Huntelmann (eds.), Grundlagen der Ethik. 123.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. B. Jonathan (2007). Interview with Dr Jonathan Beckwith. Bioessays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology 29 (12):1257.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Donald J. Kagay (2007). Jonathan Ray, The Sephardic Frontier: The “Reconquista” and the Jewish Community in Medieval Iberia. (Conjunctions of Religion and Power in the Medieval Past.) Ithaca, N.Y., and London: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. Xiii, 198 Plus Black-and-White Frontispiece; Maps. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (4):1028-1030.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Peter Milward (2013). Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. By Jonathan Dollimore. Pp. Cv, 313, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 2010 (3rd Ed. 1st Ed 1984), $25.76. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (6):1045-1045.score: 72.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. William H. Friedland (2008). Kevin Morgan, Terry Marsden, and Jonathan Murdoch: Worlds of Food: Place, Power, and Provenance in the Food Chain. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):291-294.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of at-Will Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119 - 130.score: 42.0
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jonathan Gelati, Antonino Rotolo, Giovanni Sartor & Guido Governatori (2004). Normative Autonomy and Normative Co-Ordination: Declarative Power, Representation, and Mandate. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):53-81.score: 42.0
    In this paper we provide a formal analysis of the idea of normative co-ordination. We argue that this idea is based on the assumption that agents can achieve flexible co-ordination by conferring normative positions to other agents. These positions include duties, permissions, and powers. In particular, we explain the idea of declarative power, which consists in the capacity of the power-holder of creating normative positions, involving other agents, simply by proclaiming such positions. In addition, we account also for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Fred R. Dallmayr (2005). Small Wonder: Global Power and its Discontents. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 42.0
    Small wonder: finitude and its horizons -- The underside of modernity: Adorno, Heidegger, and Dussel -- Empire or cosmopolis: civilization at the crossroads -- Confronting empire: a tribute to Arundhati Roy -- Speaking truth to power: in memory of Edward Said -- Critical intellectuals in a global age: toward a global public sphere -- Social identity and creative praxis: hommage á Merleau-Ponty -- Nature and artifact: Gadamer on human health -- Borders or horizons?: an older debate revisited -- Empire (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Roland A. Delattre (2003). Aesthetics and Ethics: Jonathan Edwards and the Recovery of Aesthetics for Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):277 - 297.score: 36.0
    This is a tricentennial riff on the Edwardsean idea that beauty is both the first principle of being and the distinguishing perfection of God. What is really distinctive about Edwards's view of beauty is that it is an ontological reality and consists in joyfully bestowing being and beauty more than in being beautiful, in creative and beautifying activity more than in being beautiful. Edwards was also a pioneer in the way he envisaged a lively universe created by God, not out (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jonathan Bennett (1974). The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. Philosophy 49 (188):123-134.score: 30.0
    In this paper1 I shall present not just the conscience of Huckleberry Finn but two others as well. One of them is the conscience of Heinrich Himmler. He became a Nazi in 1923; he served drably and quietly, but well, and was rewarded with increasing responsibility and power. At the peak of his career he held many offices and commands, of which the most powerful was that of leader of the S.S. - the principal police force of the Nazi (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jonathan I. Israel (2001). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Brian Jonathan Garrett (2013). Constitution, Over Determination and Causal Power. Ratio 26 (2):162-178.score: 30.0
    Kim's exclusion argument threatens to show that irreducible constituted objects are epiphenomenal. Kim's arguments are examined and found to be unconvincing; that a constituted cause requires its constituent to be a cause is not an adequate reason to reject the causation of the constituted object (event or property-instance). However, I introduce and argue for, the Causal Power Uniqueness Condition (CPUC). I argue that CPUC and the causal closure of the physical, implies that constituted objects or property-instances are not novel (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jonathan Glover (2008). Choosing Children: Genes, Disability, and Design. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    Progress in genetic and reproductive technology now offers us the possibility of choosing what kinds of children we do and don't have. Should we welcome this power, or should we fear its implications? There is no ethical question more urgent than this: we may be at a turning-point in the history of humanity. The renowned moral philosopher and best-selling author Jonathan Glover shows us how we might try to answer this question, and other provoking and disturbing questions to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Part One. The Spectacular Life of Spider-Man? 1. Does Peter Parker Have a Good Life? Neil Mussett 2. What Price Atonement? Peter Parker and the Infinite Debt Taneli Kukkonen "My Name is Peter Parker": Unmasking the Right and the Good Mark D. White Part Two. Responsibility-Man 4. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility": Spider-Man, Christian Ethics, and the Problem of Evil Adam Barkman 5. Does Great Power Bring Great Responsibility? Spider-Man and the Good (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hamid Seyedsayamdost, On Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions: Failure of Replication.score: 24.0
    In one of the earlier influential papers in the field of experimental philosophy titled Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions published in 2001, Jonathan M. Weinberg, Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich reported that respondents answered Gettier type questions differently depending on their ethnic background as well as socioeconomic status. There is currently a debate going on, on the significance of the results of Weinberg et al. (2001) and its implications for philosophical methodology in general and epistemology in specific. Despite the debates, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.score: 24.0
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Bruce Baugh (2011). Time, Duration and Eternity in Spinoza. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):211-233.score: 24.0
    I use Jonathan Bennett’s, Gilles Deleuze’s and Pierre Macherey’s interpretations of Spinoza to extract a theory of time and duration from Spinoza. I argue that although time can be considered a product of the imagination, duration is a real property of existing things and corresponds to their essence, taking essence (as Deleuze does) as a degree of power of existing. The article then explores the relations among time, duration, essence and eternity, arguing against the idea that Spinoza’s essences (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Neil Levy (2004). Epistemic Akrasia and the Subsumption of Evidence. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):149-156.score: 24.0
    According to one influential view, advanced by Jonathan Adler, David Owens and Susan Hurley, epistemic akrasia is impossible because when we form a full belief, any apparent evidence against that belief loses its power over us. Thus theoretical reasoning is quite unlike practical reasoning, in that in the latter our desires continue to exert a pull, even when they are outweighed by countervailing considerations. I call this argument against the possibility of epistemic akrasia the subsumption view. The subsumption (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jonathan Ellis (2006). Color, Error, and Explanatory Power. Dialectica 60 (2):171-179.score: 24.0
    At least since Democritus, philosophers have been fond of the idea that material objects do not “really” have color. One such view is the error theory, according to which our ordinary judgments ascribing colors to objects are all erroneous, false; no object has any color at all. The error theorist proposes that everything that is so, including the fact that material objects appear to us to have color, can be explained without ever attributing color to objects—by appealing merely to, e.g., (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.score: 24.0
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Brandon Look (2002). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750 (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):399-400.score: 24.0
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Chad Van Schoelandt (forthcoming). Justification, Coercion, and the Place of Public Reason. Philosophical Studies:1-20.score: 24.0
    Public reason accounts commonly claim that exercises of coercive political power must be justified by appeal to reasons accessible to all citizens. Such accounts are vulnerable to the objection that they cannot legitimate coercion to protect basic liberal rights against infringement by deeply illiberal people. This paper first elaborates the distinctive interpersonal conception of justification in public reason accounts in contrast to impersonal forms of justification. I then detail a core dissenter-based objection to public reason based on a worrisome (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Micaela Di Leonardo (1998). Exotics at Home: Anthropologies, Others, American Modernity. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    In this pathbreaking study, Micaela di Leonardo reveals the face of power within the mask of cultural difference. From the 1893 World's Fair to Body Shop advertisements, di Leonardo focuses on the intimate and shifting relations between popular portrayals of exotic Others and the practice of anthropology. In so doing, she casts new light on gender, race, and the public sphere in America's past and present. "An impressive work of scholarship that is mordantly witty, passionately argued, and takes no (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jonathan Schonsheck (1987). A Flight of Fancy on The Tangled Wing or How Not to Argue for More Women in Positions of Power. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):95-100.score: 24.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 24.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jonathan E. Adler (1993). Reasonableness, Bias, and the Untapped Power of Procedure. Synthese 94 (1):105 - 125.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robin Cooper, A Type Theoretic Approach to Information State Update in Issue Based Dialogue Management.score: 24.0
    For several years the research group at our Dialogue Systems Lab has been involved in the development of the information state update approach to the building of dialogue systems and in particular Issue based dialogue management developed in Staffan Larsson's PhD thesis and based on Jonathan Ginzburg's gameboard approach to dialogue, focussing on the notion of questions (or issues) under discussion. Larsson's computational approach to information state updates involves a large collection of update rules which fire when certain conditions (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jonathan Simon (2003). Barbara Clow, Negotiating Disease: Power and Cancer Care, 1900–1950. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):47-50.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Benedictus de Spinoza (2007). Theological-Political Treatise. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. In it Spinoza discusses at length the historical circumstances of the composition and transmission of the Bible, demonstrating the fallibility of both its authors and its interpreters. He argues that free enquiry is not only consistent with the security and prosperity of a state but actually essential to them, and that such freedom flourishes best in a democratic and republican state in which individuals (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jonathan Glover (2008). Identity, Violence and the Power of Illusion. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oup Oxford.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). “Torah and Political Power: Judaism and the Liberal Polity. Trumah.score: 24.0
    Discusses the respects in which religiously grounded considerations can have an appropriate---even important--role in the public and political discourse of a liberal polity. Examines the role tradition can have in enabling people to attain a reasoned justification for moral ideas and ideals, i.e., tradition is not always an impediment to universally valid or objective considerations. Also, discusses respects in which modern liberalism owes an important debt to religious ideas.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jonathan Edwards (2009). Jonathan Edwards, Freedom of the Will, The Works of Jonathan Edward, Vol. I. Yale University Press.score: 21.0
    Presents an analysis of Jonathan Edwards' theological position. This book includes a study of his life and the intellectual issues in the America of his time, and examines the problem of free will in connection with Leibniz, Locke, and Hume.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jonathan Edwards (1995). A Jonathan Edwards Reader. Yale University Press.score: 21.0
    Prepared by editors of the distinguished series The Works of Jonathan Edwards, this authoritative anthology includes selected treatises, sermons, and autobiographical material by early America’s greatest theologian and philosopher.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Babette Babich (2007). Heidegger’s Will to Power. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (1):37-60.score: 18.0
    On Heidegger's Beitraege and the influence of Nietzsche's Will to Power (a famous non-book).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Petri Ylikoski & Jaakko Kuorikoski (2010). Dissecting Explanatory Power. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):201–219.score: 18.0
    Comparisons of rival explanations or theories often involve vague appeals to explanatory power. In this paper, we dissect this metaphor by distinguishing between different dimensions of the goodness of an explanation: non-sensitivity, cognitive salience, precision, factual accuracy and degree of integration. These dimensions are partially independent and often come into conflict. Our main contribution is to go beyond simple stipulation or description by explicating why these factors are taken to be explanatory virtues. We accomplish this by using the contrastive-counterfactual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jonathan D. Jacobs (2007). Causal Powers: A Neo-Aristotelian Metaphysic. Dissertation, Indiana Universityscore: 18.0
    Causal powers, say, an electron’s power to repel other electrons, are had in virtue of having properties. Electrons repel other electrons because they are negatively charged. One’s views about causal powers are shaped by—and shape—one’s views concerning properties, causation, laws of nature and modality. It is no surprise, then, that views about the nature of causal powers are generally embedded into larger, more systematic, metaphysical pictures of the world. This dissertation is an exploration of three systematic metaphysics, Neo-Humeanism, Nomicism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Martin Saar (2008). Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.score: 18.0
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (collective) history (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Donovan Miyasaki (2013). Nietzsche's Will to Power as Naturalist Critical Ontology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):251-69.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue that Nietzsche’s published works contain a substantial, although implicit, argument for the will to power as ontology—a critical and descriptive, rather than positive and explanatory, theory of reality. Further, I suggest this ontology is entirely consistent with a naturalist methodology. The will to power ontology follows directly from Nietzsche’s naturalist rejection of three metaphysical presuppositions: substance, efficient causality, and final causality. I show that a number of interpretations, including those of Clark, Schacht, Reginster, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jonathan D. Jacobs, A Powers Theory of Causation.score: 18.0
    In this paper, my central aim is to defend the Powers Theory of causation, according to which causation is the exercise of a power (or manifestation of a disposition). I will do so by, first, presenting a recent version of the Powers Theory, that of Mumford (Forthcoming). Second, I will raise an objection to Mumford’s account. Third, I will offer a revised version that avoids the objection. And, fourth, I will end by briefly comparing the proposed Powers Theory with (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Bonnie Steinbock & Alastair Norcross (eds.) (1994). Killing and Letting Die. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    This collection contains twenty-one thought-provoking essays on the controversies surrounding the moral and legal distinctions between euthanasia and "letting die." Since public awareness of this issue has increased this second edition includes nine entirely new essays which bring the treatment of the subject up-to-date. The urgency of this issue can be gauged in recent developments such as the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in the Netherlands, "how-to" manuals topping the bestseller charts in the United States, and the many headlines devoted to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This paper explores this tension between the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Benda Hofmeyr (2006). The Power Not to Be (What We Are): The Politics and Ethics of Self-Creation in Foucault. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):215-230.score: 18.0
    on ethics provides an opportunity to go beyond some of the controversies generated by his work of the 1970s. It was thought, for example, that Foucault had overstated the extent to which individuals could be ‘subjected’ to the influence of power, leaving them little room to resist. This paper will consider the ‘politics’ of self-creation. We shall attempt to establish to what extent Foucault’s later notion of self-formation does in fact succeed in countering an over determination by power. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sheila Jasanoff & Sang-Hyun Kim (2009). Containing the Atom: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and Nuclear Power in the United States and South Korea. Minerva 47 (2):119-146.score: 18.0
    STS research has devoted relatively little attention to the promotion and reception of science and technology by non-scientific actors and institutions. One consequence is that the relationship of science and technology to political power has tended to remain undertheorized. This article aims to fill that gap by introducing the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries. Through a comparative examination of the development and regulation of nuclear power in the US and South Korea, the article demonstrates the analytic potential of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.score: 18.0
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, I argue that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Henry Laycock (1999). Exploitation Via Labour Power in Marx. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):121--131.score: 18.0
    Marx''s account of capitalist exploitation is undermined by inter-related confusions surrounding the notion of labour power. These confusions relate to [i] what labour power is, [ii] what happens to labour power in the labour market, and [iii] what the epistemic status of labour power is (the issue of appearance and reality). The central theses of the paper are [a] that property ownership is the wrong model for understanding the exploitation of labour, and [b] that the concept (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Power. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the connections between human rights, human dignity, and power. The idea of human dignity is omnipresent in human rights discourse, but its meaning and point is not always clear. It is standardly used in two ways, to refer to (a) a normative status of persons that makes their treatment in terms of human rights a proper response, and (b) a social condition of persons in which their human rights are fulfilled. This paper pursues three tasks. First, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) The Equivocal Use of Power in Nietzsche's Failed Anti-Egalitarianism. Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-32.score: 18.0
    Nietzsche’s rejection of egalitarianism depends on equivocation between distinct conceptions of power and equality. When these distinct views are disentangled, Nietzsche’s arguments succeed only against a narrow sense of equality as qualitative similarity, and not against quantitative forms that promote equality not as similarity but as multiple, proportional resistances. For the promotion of an individual’s qualitative power is compatible with quantitative power equality. Moreover, because power is felt only in resistance, the feeling of power requires (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000