Search results for 'Jonathan Power' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nina Power (2009). Axel Honneth, Reification: A New Look at an Old Idea, with Judith Butler, Raymond Geuss and Jonathan Lear. Radical Philosophy 154:54.score: 360.0
     
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  2. Jonathan Power (2003). Do We Need to Make War on Behalf of Human Rights? Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.score: 240.0
     
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  3. Truth Or Power (2003). He Main Thesis for Which I Intend to Argue is That There is an Exclusi-T Ve Disjunction Between Two Options for the Foundations of Morality: There is Truth or There is the Exercise of Power. 1 In Other Words, the Deni. In P. Schaber & R. Huntelmann (eds.), Grundlagen der Ethik. 123.score: 180.0
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  4. B. Jonathan (2007). Interview with Dr Jonathan Beckwith. Bioessays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology 29 (12):1257.score: 180.0
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  5. Donald J. Kagay (2007). Jonathan Ray, The Sephardic Frontier: The “Reconquista” and the Jewish Community in Medieval Iberia. (Conjunctions of Religion and Power in the Medieval Past.) Ithaca, N.Y., and London: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. Xiii, 198 Plus Black-and-White Frontispiece; Maps. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (4):1028-1030.score: 120.0
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  6. Peter Milward (2013). Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. By Jonathan Dollimore. Pp. Cv, 313, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 2010 (3rd Ed. 1st Ed 1984), $25.76. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (6):1045-1045.score: 120.0
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  7. William H. Friedland (2008). Kevin Morgan, Terry Marsden, and Jonathan Murdoch: Worlds of Food: Place, Power, and Provenance in the Food Chain. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):291-294.score: 120.0
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  8. James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of at-Will Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119 - 130.score: 54.0
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications (...)
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  9. Jonathan Gelati, Antonino Rotolo, Giovanni Sartor & Guido Governatori (2004). Normative Autonomy and Normative Co-Ordination: Declarative Power, Representation, and Mandate. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):53-81.score: 54.0
    In this paper we provide a formal analysis of the idea of normative co-ordination. We argue that this idea is based on the assumption that agents can achieve flexible co-ordination by conferring normative positions to other agents. These positions include duties, permissions, and powers. In particular, we explain the idea of declarative power, which consists in the capacity of the power-holder of creating normative positions, involving other agents, simply by proclaiming such positions. In addition, we account also for (...)
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  10. Fred R. Dallmayr (2005). Small Wonder: Global Power and its Discontents. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 54.0
    Small wonder: finitude and its horizons -- The underside of modernity: Adorno, Heidegger, and Dussel -- Empire or cosmopolis: civilization at the crossroads -- Confronting empire: a tribute to Arundhati Roy -- Speaking truth to power: in memory of Edward Said -- Critical intellectuals in a global age: toward a global public sphere -- Social identity and creative praxis: hommage á Merleau-Ponty -- Nature and artifact: Gadamer on human health -- Borders or horizons?: an older debate revisited -- Empire (...)
     
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  11. Roland A. Delattre (2003). Aesthetics and Ethics: Jonathan Edwards and the Recovery of Aesthetics for Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):277 - 297.score: 48.0
    This is a tricentennial riff on the Edwardsean idea that beauty is both the first principle of being and the distinguishing perfection of God. What is really distinctive about Edwards's view of beauty is that it is an ontological reality and consists in joyfully bestowing being and beauty more than in being beautiful, in creative and beautifying activity more than in being beautiful. Edwards was also a pioneer in the way he envisaged a lively universe created by God, not out (...)
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  12. Brian Jonathan Garrett (2013). Constitution, Over Determination and Causal Power. Ratio 26 (2):162-178.score: 42.0
    Kim's exclusion argument threatens to show that irreducible constituted objects are epiphenomenal. Kim's arguments are examined and found to be unconvincing; that a constituted cause requires its constituent to be a cause is not an adequate reason to reject the causation of the constituted object (event or property-instance). However, I introduce and argue for, the Causal Power Uniqueness Condition (CPUC). I argue that CPUC and the causal closure of the physical, implies that constituted objects or property-instances are not novel (...)
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  13. Jonathan Ellis (2006). Color, Error, and Explanatory Power. Dialectica 60 (2):171-179.score: 36.0
    At least since Democritus, philosophers have been fond of the idea that material objects do not “really” have color. One such view is the error theory, according to which our ordinary judgments ascribing colors to objects are all erroneous, false; no object has any color at all. The error theorist proposes that everything that is so, including the fact that material objects appear to us to have color, can be explained without ever attributing color to objects—by appealing merely to, e.g., (...)
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  14. Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.score: 36.0
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
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  15. Jonathan Schonsheck (1987). A Flight of Fancy on The Tangled Wing or How Not to Argue for More Women in Positions of Power. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):95-100.score: 36.0
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  16. Jonathan E. Adler (1993). Reasonableness, Bias, and the Untapped Power of Procedure. Synthese 94 (1):105 - 125.score: 36.0
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  17. Jonathan Simon (2003). Barbara Clow, Negotiating Disease: Power and Cancer Care, 1900–1950. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):47-50.score: 36.0
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  18. Jonathan Glover (2008). Identity, Violence and the Power of Illusion. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oup Oxford.score: 36.0
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  19. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). “Torah and Political Power: Judaism and the Liberal Polity. Trumah.score: 36.0
    Discusses the respects in which religiously grounded considerations can have an appropriate---even important--role in the public and political discourse of a liberal polity. Examines the role tradition can have in enabling people to attain a reasoned justification for moral ideas and ideals, i.e., tradition is not always an impediment to universally valid or objective considerations. Also, discusses respects in which modern liberalism owes an important debt to religious ideas.
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  20. Jonathan Bennett (1974). The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. Philosophy 49 (188):123-134.score: 30.0
    In this paper1 I shall present not just the conscience of Huckleberry Finn but two others as well. One of them is the conscience of Heinrich Himmler. He became a Nazi in 1923; he served drably and quietly, but well, and was rewarded with increasing responsibility and power. At the peak of his career he held many offices and commands, of which the most powerful was that of leader of the S.S. - the principal police force of the Nazi (...)
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  21. Jonathan I. Israel (2001). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions (...)
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  22. Jonathan Glover (2008). Choosing Children: Genes, Disability, and Design. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    Progress in genetic and reproductive technology now offers us the possibility of choosing what kinds of children we do and don't have. Should we welcome this power, or should we fear its implications? There is no ethical question more urgent than this: we may be at a turning-point in the history of humanity. The renowned moral philosopher and best-selling author Jonathan Glover shows us how we might try to answer this question, and other provoking and disturbing questions to (...)
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  23. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Part One. The Spectacular Life of Spider-Man? 1. Does Peter Parker Have a Good Life? Neil Mussett 2. What Price Atonement? Peter Parker and the Infinite Debt Taneli Kukkonen "My Name is Peter Parker": Unmasking the Right and the Good Mark D. White Part Two. Responsibility-Man 4. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility": Spider-Man, Christian Ethics, and the Problem of Evil Adam Barkman 5. Does Great Power Bring Great Responsibility? Spider-Man and the Good (...)
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  24. Jonathan Edwards (2009). Jonathan Edwards, Freedom of the Will, The Works of Jonathan Edward, Vol. I. Yale University Press.score: 27.0
    Presents an analysis of Jonathan Edwards' theological position. This book includes a study of his life and the intellectual issues in the America of his time, and examines the problem of free will in connection with Leibniz, Locke, and Hume.
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  25. Jonathan Edwards (1995). A Jonathan Edwards Reader. Yale University Press.score: 27.0
    Prepared by editors of the distinguished series The Works of Jonathan Edwards, this authoritative anthology includes selected treatises, sermons, and autobiographical material by early America’s greatest theologian and philosopher.
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  26. Babette Babich (2007). Heidegger’s Will to Power. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (1):37-60.score: 24.0
    On Heidegger's Beitraege and the influence of Nietzsche's Will to Power (a famous non-book).
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  27. Petri Ylikoski & Jaakko Kuorikoski (2010). Dissecting Explanatory Power. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):201–219.score: 24.0
    Comparisons of rival explanations or theories often involve vague appeals to explanatory power. In this paper, we dissect this metaphor by distinguishing between different dimensions of the goodness of an explanation: non-sensitivity, cognitive salience, precision, factual accuracy and degree of integration. These dimensions are partially independent and often come into conflict. Our main contribution is to go beyond simple stipulation or description by explicating why these factors are taken to be explanatory virtues. We accomplish this by using the contrastive-counterfactual (...)
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  28. Hamid Seyedsayamdost, On Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions: Failure of Replication.score: 24.0
    In one of the earlier influential papers in the field of experimental philosophy titled Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions published in 2001, Jonathan M. Weinberg, Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich reported that respondents answered Gettier type questions differently depending on their ethnic background as well as socioeconomic status. There is currently a debate going on, on the significance of the results of Weinberg et al. (2001) and its implications for philosophical methodology in general and epistemology in specific. Despite the debates, (...)
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  29. Donovan Miyasaki (2013). Nietzsche's Will to Power as Naturalist Critical Ontology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):251-69.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I argue that Nietzsche’s published works contain a substantial, although implicit, argument for the will to power as ontology—a critical and descriptive, rather than positive and explanatory, theory of reality. Further, I suggest this ontology is entirely consistent with a naturalist methodology. The will to power ontology follows directly from Nietzsche’s naturalist rejection of three metaphysical presuppositions: substance, efficient causality, and final causality. I show that a number of interpretations, including those of Clark, Schacht, Reginster, (...)
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  30. Martin Saar (2008). Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.score: 24.0
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (collective) history (...)
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  31. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.score: 24.0
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
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  32. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This paper explores this tension between the (...)
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  33. Bruce Baugh (2011). Time, Duration and Eternity in Spinoza. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):211-233.score: 24.0
    I use Jonathan Bennett’s, Gilles Deleuze’s and Pierre Macherey’s interpretations of Spinoza to extract a theory of time and duration from Spinoza. I argue that although time can be considered a product of the imagination, duration is a real property of existing things and corresponds to their essence, taking essence (as Deleuze does) as a degree of power of existing. The article then explores the relations among time, duration, essence and eternity, arguing against the idea that Spinoza’s essences (...)
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  34. Sheila Jasanoff & Sang-Hyun Kim (2009). Containing the Atom: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and Nuclear Power in the United States and South Korea. Minerva 47 (2):119-146.score: 24.0
    STS research has devoted relatively little attention to the promotion and reception of science and technology by non-scientific actors and institutions. One consequence is that the relationship of science and technology to political power has tended to remain undertheorized. This article aims to fill that gap by introducing the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries. Through a comparative examination of the development and regulation of nuclear power in the US and South Korea, the article demonstrates the analytic potential of the (...)
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  35. Benda Hofmeyr (2006). The Power Not to Be (What We Are): The Politics and Ethics of Self-Creation in Foucault. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):215-230.score: 24.0
    on ethics provides an opportunity to go beyond some of the controversies generated by his work of the 1970s. It was thought, for example, that Foucault had overstated the extent to which individuals could be ‘subjected’ to the influence of power, leaving them little room to resist. This paper will consider the ‘politics’ of self-creation. We shall attempt to establish to what extent Foucault’s later notion of self-formation does in fact succeed in countering an over determination by power. (...)
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  36. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.score: 24.0
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, I argue that (...)
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  37. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Power. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the connections between human rights, human dignity, and power. The idea of human dignity is omnipresent in human rights discourse, but its meaning and point is not always clear. It is standardly used in two ways, to refer to (a) a normative status of persons that makes their treatment in terms of human rights a proper response, and (b) a social condition of persons in which their human rights are fulfilled. This paper pursues three tasks. First, (...)
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  38. Neil Levy (2004). Epistemic Akrasia and the Subsumption of Evidence. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):149-156.score: 24.0
    According to one influential view, advanced by Jonathan Adler, David Owens and Susan Hurley, epistemic akrasia is impossible because when we form a full belief, any apparent evidence against that belief loses its power over us. Thus theoretical reasoning is quite unlike practical reasoning, in that in the latter our desires continue to exert a pull, even when they are outweighed by countervailing considerations. I call this argument against the possibility of epistemic akrasia the subsumption view. The subsumption (...)
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  39. K. Britz (1999). A Power Algebra for Theory Change. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (4):429-443.score: 24.0
    Various representation results have been established for logics of belief revision, in terms of remainder sets, epistemic entrenchment, systems of spheres and so on. In this paper I present another representation for logics of belief revision, as an algebra of theories. I show that an algebra of theories, enriched with a set of rejection operations, provides a suitable algebraic framework to characterize the theory change operations of systems of belief revision. The theory change operations arise as power operations of (...)
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  40. Henry Laycock (1999). Exploitation Via Labour Power in Marx. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):121--131.score: 24.0
    Marx''s account of capitalist exploitation is undermined by inter-related confusions surrounding the notion of labour power. These confusions relate to [i] what labour power is, [ii] what happens to labour power in the labour market, and [iii] what the epistemic status of labour power is (the issue of appearance and reality). The central theses of the paper are [a] that property ownership is the wrong model for understanding the exploitation of labour, and [b] that the concept (...)
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  41. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) The Equivocal Use of Power in Nietzsche's Failed Anti-Egalitarianism. Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-32.score: 24.0
    Nietzsche’s rejection of egalitarianism depends on equivocation between distinct conceptions of power and equality. When these distinct views are disentangled, Nietzsche’s arguments succeed only against a narrow sense of equality as qualitative similarity, and not against quantitative forms that promote equality not as similarity but as multiple, proportional resistances. For the promotion of an individual’s qualitative power is compatible with quantitative power equality. Moreover, because power is felt only in resistance, the feeling of power requires (...)
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  42. Peter Morriss (2002). Power: A Philosophical Analysis. Manchester University Press.score: 24.0
    Peter Morriss discusses the notion of 'power' and attempts to show how recent accounts of power have misinterpreted crucial components, thereby producing faulty analyses. He puts the study of power into a modern context and also explains why an understanding of power is so important in developing a radical critique of a society. The revised second edition includes a new foreword.
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  43. Jiafeng Zhu (2012). Legitimacy as a Mere Moral Power? A Response to Applbaum. Diametros 33 (33):120-137.score: 24.0
    In a recent article, Arthur Applbaum contributes a new view—legitimacy as a moral power—to the debate over the concept of political legitimacy. Applbaum rejects competing views of legitimacy, in particular legitimacy as a claim-right to have the law obeyed, for mistakenly invoking substantive moral argument in the conceptual analysis, and concludes that “at the core of the concept—what legitimacy is” is only a Hohfeldian moral power. In this article, I contend that: (1) Applbaum’s view of legitimacy, when fully (...)
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  44. Sandra Field (2014). Hobbes and the Question of Power. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):61-85.score: 24.0
    The Question of Power is Central to the study of politics. Thomas Hobbes has been hailed as the author of the greatest political philosophy written in the English language,1 and indeed as the philosopher of power par excellence.2 Nonetheless, i argue that conceptualizing political power is a problem for Hobbes. He starts with a commonsense view that understands the power of individuals as their natural faculties, and that then envisages these powers being compounded together by covenant (...)
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  45. Stefan Wintein (2012). Assertoric Semantics and the Computational Power of Self-Referential Truth. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):317-345.score: 24.0
    There is no consensus as to whether a Liar sentence is meaningful or not. Still, a widespread conviction with respect to Liar sentences (and other ungrounded sentences) is that, whether or not they are meaningful, they are useless . The philosophical contribution of this paper is to put this conviction into question. Using the framework of assertoric semantics , which is a semantic valuation method for languages of self-referential truth that has been developed by the author, we show that certain (...)
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  46. Jan Tullberg (2004). Illusions of Corporate Power:Revisiting the Relative Powers of Corporations and Governments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):325 - 333.score: 24.0
    A common opinion is that power has shifted from states to companies. This article discusses quantitative and qualitative aspects of power possessed by companies and by states. A more adequate comparison than that between company sales and gross national product is the one between company value added and GNP. Also more adequate is the comparison between the public sector and company net profit. These rival measures take down company power to about a tenth of the sales measure. (...)
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  47. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.score: 24.0
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of (...)
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  48. Christine James (2010). The Common Vernacular of Power Relations in Heavy Metal and Christian Fundamentalist Performances. In Rosemary Hill Karl Spracklen (ed.), Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics. Inter-Disciplinary Press.score: 24.0
    Wittgenstein’s comment that what can be shown cannot be said has a special resonance with visual representations of power in both Heavy Metal and Fundamentalist Christian communities. Performances at metal shows, and performances of ‘religious theatre’, share an emphasis on violence and destruction. For example, groups like GWAR and Cannibal Corpse feature violent scenes in stage shows and album covers, scenes that depict gory results of unrestrained sexuality that are strikingly like Halloween ‘Hell House’ show presented by neo-Conservative, Fundamentalist (...)
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  49. Xiangdong Xu (2011). Thomas Reid on Active Power and Free Agency. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):369-389.score: 24.0
    The paper argues that it is a mistake to interpret Thomas Reid as holding a libertarian notion of freedom, and to make use of Reid to argue in support of a libertarian position. More precisely, this paper shows that Reid’s theory of agent-causation may not be what these philosophers take it to be, once such crucial notions as agent-causation and active power in Reid’s theory of free agency have been fully explicated. Reid is more committed to accepting the view (...)
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  50. Judith Butler (1997). The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    The author considers the way in which psychic life is generated by the social operation of power, and how that social operation of power is concealed and fortified by the psyche that it produces. Power is no longer understood to be 'internalized' by an existing subject, but the subject is spawned as an ambivalent effect of power, one that is staged through the operation of conscience. To claim that power fabricates the psyche is also to (...)
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