Search results for 'Jonathan Power' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nina Power (2009). Axel Honneth, Reification: A New Look at an Old Idea, with Judith Butler, Raymond Geuss and Jonathan Lear. Radical Philosophy 154:54.
     
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  2. Jonathan Power (2003). Do We Need to Make War on Behalf of Human Rights? Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.
     
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  3.  3
    B. Jonathan (2007). Interview with Dr Jonathan Beckwith. Bioessays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology 29 (12):1257.
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  4.  4
    Truth Or Power (2003). He Main Thesis for Which I Intend to Argue is That There is an Exclusi-T Ve Disjunction Between Two Options for the Foundations of Morality: There is Truth or There is the Exercise of Power. 1 In Other Words, the Deni. In P. Schaber & R. Huntelmann (eds.), Grundlagen der Ethik. 123.
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  5.  6
    William H. Friedland (2008). Kevin Morgan, Terry Marsden, and Jonathan Murdoch: Worlds of Food: Place, Power, and Provenance in the Food Chain. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):291-294.
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    Peter Milward (2013). Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries. By Jonathan Dollimore. Pp. Cv, 313, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, 2010 (3rd Ed. 1st Ed 1984), $25.76. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (6):1045-1045.
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    Donald J. Kagay (2007). Jonathan Ray, The Sephardic Frontier: The “Reconquista” and the Jewish Community in Medieval Iberia. (Conjunctions of Religion and Power in the Medieval Past.) Ithaca, N.Y., and London: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. Xiii, 198 Plus Black-and-White Frontispiece; Maps. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (4):1028-1030.
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  8. Brygida Guest (1985). "Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries": Jonathan Dollimore. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1):88.
     
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  9. Eduardo Mendieta & Jonathan VanAntwerpen (eds.) (2011). The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere. Cup.
    _The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere_ represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does—or should—religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of (...)
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  10.  18
    Jonathan Gelati, Antonino Rotolo, Giovanni Sartor & Guido Governatori (2004). Normative Autonomy and Normative Co-Ordination: Declarative Power, Representation, and Mandate. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):53-81.
    In this paper we provide a formal analysis of the idea of normative co-ordination. We argue that this idea is based on the assumption that agents can achieve flexible co-ordination by conferring normative positions to other agents. These positions include duties, permissions, and powers. In particular, we explain the idea of declarative power, which consists in the capacity of the power-holder of creating normative positions, involving other agents, simply by proclaiming such positions. In addition, we account also for (...)
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  11.  25
    James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of at-Will Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119 - 130.
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications (...)
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  12. Fred R. Dallmayr (2005). Small Wonder: Global Power and its Discontents. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Small wonder: finitude and its horizons -- The underside of modernity: Adorno, Heidegger, and Dussel -- Empire or cosmopolis: civilization at the crossroads -- Confronting empire: a tribute to Arundhati Roy -- Speaking truth to power: in memory of Edward Said -- Critical intellectuals in a global age: toward a global public sphere -- Social identity and creative praxis: hommage á Merleau-Ponty -- Nature and artifact: Gadamer on human health -- Borders or horizons?: an older debate revisited -- Empire (...)
     
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  13.  15
    Roland A. Delattre (2003). Aesthetics and Ethics: Jonathan Edwards and the Recovery of Aesthetics for Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):277 - 297.
    This is a tricentennial riff on the Edwardsean idea that beauty is both the first principle of being and the distinguishing perfection of God. What is really distinctive about Edwards's view of beauty is that it is an ontological reality and consists in joyfully bestowing being and beauty more than in being beautiful, in creative and beautifying activity more than in being beautiful. Edwards was also a pioneer in the way he envisaged a lively universe created by God, not out (...)
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  14.  33
    Brian Jonathan Garrett (2013). Constitution, Over Determination and Causal Power. Ratio 26 (2):162-178.
    Kim's exclusion argument threatens to show that irreducible constituted objects are epiphenomenal. Kim's arguments are examined and found to be unconvincing; that a constituted cause requires its constituent to be a cause is not an adequate reason to reject the causation of the constituted object (event or property-instance). However, I introduce and argue for, the Causal Power Uniqueness Condition (CPUC). I argue that CPUC and the causal closure of the physical, implies that constituted objects or property-instances are not novel (...)
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  15.  31
    Jonathan B. King (1993). Learning to Solve the Right Problems: The Case of Nuclear Power in America. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):105 - 116.
    Three general types of problems entail different strategies. Continuing to seek solutions to tame problems when we face messes, let alone wicked problems, is potentially catastrophic hence fundamentally irresponsible. In our turbulent times, it is therefore becoming a strategic necessity to learn how to solve the right problems. Successful problem solving requires finding the right solution to the right problem. We fail more often because we solve the wrong problem than because we get the wrong solution to the right problem. (...)
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  16.  8
    Jonathan E. Adler (1993). Reasonableness, Bias, and the Untapped Power of Procedure. Synthese 94 (1):105 - 125.
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  17.  51
    Jonathan Ellis (2006). Color, Error, and Explanatory Power. Dialectica 60 (2):171-179.
    At least since Democritus, philosophers have been fond of the idea that material objects do not “really” have color. One such view is the error theory, according to which our ordinary judgments ascribing colors to objects are all erroneous, false; no object has any color at all. The error theorist proposes that everything that is so, including the fact that material objects appear to us to have color, can be explained without ever attributing color to objects—by appealing merely to, e.g., (...)
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  18.  1
    James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of At-Will Employment. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119-130.
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  19.  9
    Jonathan Simon (2003). Barbara Clow, Negotiating Disease: Power and Cancer Care, 1900–1950. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):47-50.
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  20.  5
    Jonathan Schonsheck (1987). A Flight of Fancy on The Tangled Wing or How Not to Argue for More Women in Positions of Power. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):95-100.
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  21. Jonathan Glover (2008). Identity, Violence and the Power of Illusion. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford
     
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  22. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). “Torah and Political Power: Judaism and the Liberal Polity. Trumah.
    Discusses the respects in which religiously grounded considerations can have an appropriate---even important--role in the public and political discourse of a liberal polity. Examines the role tradition can have in enabling people to attain a reasoned justification for moral ideas and ideals, i.e., tradition is not always an impediment to universally valid or objective considerations. Also, discusses respects in which modern liberalism owes an important debt to religious ideas.
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  23.  30
    Jonathan Glover (2008). Choosing Children: Genes, Disability, and Design. OUP Oxford.
    Genetic and reproductive technology now offers us the possibility of choosing what kinds of children we do and don't have. Should we welcome this power, or should we fear its implications? The renowned moral philosopher and best-selling author Jonathan Glover suggests how we should try to deal with this urgent problem.
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  24.  32
    Jonathan I. Israel (2001). Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650-1750. Oxford University Press.
    In the wake of the Scientific Revolution, the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw the complete demolition of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief by the new philosophy and the philosophes, including Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. The Radical Enlightenment played a part in this revolutionary process, which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical power, as well as man's dominance over woman, theological dominance of education, and slavery. Despite the present day interest in the revolutions (...)
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  25. Jonathan Bennett (1974). The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. Philosophy 49 (188):123-134.
    In this paper1 I shall present not just the conscience of Huckleberry Finn but two others as well. One of them is the conscience of Heinrich Himmler. He became a Nazi in 1923; he served drably and quietly, but well, and was rewarded with increasing responsibility and power. At the peak of his career he held many offices and commands, of which the most powerful was that of leader of the S.S. - the principal police force of the Nazi (...)
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  26. Jonathan Gorman (2007). Historical Judgement. Acumen/McGill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to model (...)
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  27. Jonathan Gorman (2008). Historical Judgement. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to model (...)
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  28. Jonathan Gorman (2008). Historical Judgement. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to model (...)
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  29. Jonathan Gorman (2014). Historical Judgement. Routledge.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to model (...)
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  30. Jonathan Gorman (2007). Historical Judgement: The Limits of Historiographical Choice. Routledge.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to model (...)
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  31. Jonathan Israel & Michael Silverthorne (eds.) (2007). Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise. Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. In it Spinoza discusses at length the historical circumstances of the composition and transmission of the Bible, demonstrating the fallibility of both its authors and its interpreters. He argues that free enquiry is not only consistent with the security and prosperity of a state but actually essential to them, and that such freedom flourishes best in a democratic and republican state in which individuals are (...)
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  32. Jonathan Israel & Michael Silverthorne (eds.) (2012). Spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise. Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. In it Spinoza discusses at length the historical circumstances of the composition and transmission of the Bible, demonstrating the fallibility of both its authors and its interpreters. He argues that free enquiry is not only consistent with the security and prosperity of a state but actually essential to them, and that such freedom flourishes best in a democratic and republican state in which individuals are (...)
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  33.  31
    Judith Butler (1997). The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford University Press.
    The author considers the way in which psychic life is generated by the social operation of power, and how that social operation of power is concealed and fortified by the psyche that it produces. Power is no longer understood to be 'internalized' by an existing subject, but the subject is spawned as an ambivalent effect of power, one that is staged through the operation of conscience. To claim that power fabricates the psyche is also to (...)
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  34.  98
    Jonas Jervell Indregard (forthcoming). Kant's Causal Power Argument Against Empirical Affection. Kantian Review.
    A well-known trilemma faces the interpretation of Kant’s theory of affection, namely whether the objects that affect us are empirical, noumenal, or both. I argue that according to Kant, the things that affect us and cause representations in us are not empirical objects. I articulate what I call the Causal Power Argument, according to which empirical objects cannot affect us because they do not have the right kind of power to cause representations. All the causal powers that empirical (...)
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  35.  19
    Jonathan Edwards (1995). A Jonathan Edwards Reader. Yale University Press.
    Prepared by editors of the distinguished series The Works of Jonathan Edwards, this authoritative anthology includes selected treatises, sermons, and autobiographical material by early America’s greatest theologian and philosopher.
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  36.  29
    Jonathan Edwards (2009). Jonathan Edwards, Freedom of the Will, The Works of Jonathan Edward, Vol. I. Yale University Press.
    Presents an analysis of Jonathan Edwards' theological position. This book includes a study of his life and the intellectual issues in the America of his time, and examines the problem of free will in connection with Leibniz, Locke, and Hume.
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  37. Michel Foucault & Colin Gordon (1980). Power/Knowledge Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977.
     
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  38. Wendy Brown (1995). States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity. Princeton University Press.
    Whether in characterizing Catharine MacKinnon's theory of gender as itself pornographic or in identifying liberalism as unable to make good on its promises, Wendy Brown pursues a central question: how does a sense of woundedness become the basis for a sense of identity? Brown argues that efforts to outlaw hate speech and pornography powerfully legitimize the state: such apparently well-intentioned attempts harm victims further by portraying them as so helpless as to be in continuing need of governmental protection. "Whether one (...)
     
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  39.  9
    Soňa Lemrová, Eva Reiterová, Renáta Fatěnová, Karel Lemr & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2013). Money is Power: Monetary Intelligence—Love of Money and Temptation of Materialism Among Czech University Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-20.
    In this study, we develop a theoretical model of monetary intelligence (MI), explore the extent to which individuals’ meaning of money is related to the pursuit of materialistic purposes, and test our model using the whole sample and across college major and gender. We select the 15-item love of money (LOM) construct—Factors Good, Evil (Affective), Budget (Behavioral), Achievement, and Power (Cognitive)—from the Money Ethic Scale and Factors Success and Centrality and two indicators—from the Materialism Scale. Based on our data (...)
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  40. Petri Ylikoski & Jaakko Kuorikoski (2010). Dissecting Explanatory Power. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):201–219.
    Comparisons of rival explanations or theories often involve vague appeals to explanatory power. In this paper, we dissect this metaphor by distinguishing between different dimensions of the goodness of an explanation: non-sensitivity, cognitive salience, precision, factual accuracy and degree of integration. These dimensions are partially independent and often come into conflict. Our main contribution is to go beyond simple stipulation or description by explicating why these factors are taken to be explanatory virtues. We accomplish this by using the contrastive-counterfactual (...)
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  41. Hamid Seyedsayamdost (2015). On Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions: Failure of Replication. Episteme 12 (1):95-116.
    In one of the earlier influential papers in the field of experimental philosophy titled Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions published in 2001, Jonathan M. Weinberg, Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich reported that respondents answered Gettier type questions differently depending on their ethnic background as well as socioeconomic status. There is currently a debate going on, on the significance of the results of Weinberg et al. (2001) and its implications for philosophical methodology in general and epistemology in specific. Despite the debates, (...)
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  42.  8
    Raymond Loi, Long W. Lam & Ka Wai Chan (2012). Coping with Job Insecurity: The Role of Procedural Justice, Ethical Leadership and Power Distance Orientation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):361-372.
    This study examines the relationship between procedural justice and employee job insecurity, and the boundary conditions of this relationship. Drawing upon uncertainty management theory and ethical leadership research, we hypothesized that procedural justice is negatively related to job insecurity, and that this relationship is moderated by ethical leadership. We further predicted that the moderating relationship would be more pronounced among employees with a low power distance orientation. We tested our hypotheses using a sample of 381 workers in Macau and (...)
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  43.  30
    Aileen Smith & Evelyn C. Hume (2005). Linking Culture and Ethics: A Comparison of Accountants' Ethical Belief Systems in the Individualism/Collectivism and Power Distance Contexts. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):209 - 220.
    This study uses accounting professionals from an international setting to test the individualism and power distance cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede [Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA) 1980]. Six countries, which appropriately represented high and low values on the Hofstede dimensions, were chosen for the survey of ethical beliefs. Respondents (n = 249) from the six countries were requested to supply their agreement/disagreement with eight questionable behaviors associated with the work environment. Each of these behaviors contained an individualism (...)
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  44.  12
    Xiaoxing Zhang (forthcoming). The Paradox of the Diffusiveness of Power. Synthese:1-12.
    Although the topic of basic act is controversial, theorists of agency normally agree that complex performances are based on comparatively simple ones. To the extent that we can attribute powers to agents over various tasks, it is also plausible to suppose that our powers over complex tasks are based on powers over the simple. Chisholm once formulated this idea in terms of the principle of the diffusiveness of power. In the present paper, however, we shall argue that the principle (...)
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  45. Antonio Negri (2009). Insurgencies: Constituent Power and the Modern State. University of Minnesota Press.
    Constituent power : the concept of a crisis -- Virtue and fortune : the machiavellian paradigm -- The Atlantic model and the theory of counterpower -- Political emancipation in the American constitution -- The revolution and the constitution of labor -- Communist desire and the dialectic restored -- The constitution of strength.
     
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  46.  31
    Samuel Bagg (forthcoming). Can Deliberation Neutralise Power? European Journal of Political Theory:1474885115610542.
    Most democratic theorists agree that concentrations of wealth and power tend to distort the functioning of democracy and ought to be countered wherever possible. Deliberative democrats are no exception: though not its only potential value, the capacity of deliberation to ‘neutralise power’ is often regarded as ‘fundamental’ to deliberative theory. Power may be neutralised, according to many deliberative democrats, if citizens can be induced to commit more fully to the deliberative resolution of common problems. If they do, (...)
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    Peter Morriss (2002). Power: A Philosophical Analysis. Manchester University Press.
    Peter Morriss discusses the notion of 'power' and attempts to show how recent accounts of power have misinterpreted crucial components, thereby producing faulty analyses. He puts the study of power into a modern context and also explains why an understanding of power is so important in developing a radical critique of a society. The revised second edition includes a new foreword.
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  48. Adam Takahashi (2008). Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):451-481.
    The Dominican theologian Albert the Great was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, “every work of nature is the work of intelligence” , expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just (...)
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    Michel Foucault (1982). The Subject and Power. Critical Inquiry 8 (4):777-795.
    I would like to suggest another way to go further toward a new economy of power relations, a way which is more empirical, more directly related to our present situation, and which implies more relations between theory and practice. It consists of taking the forms of resistance against different forms of power as a starting point. To use another metaphor, t consists of using this resistance as a chemical catalyst so as to bring to light power relations, (...)
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  50.  6
    Mohamed Chelli & Yves Gendron (2013). Sustainability Ratings and the Disciplinary Power of the Ideology of Numbers. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):187-203.
    The main purpose of this paper is to better understand how sustainability rating agencies, through discourse, promote an “ideology of numbers” that ultimately aims to establish a regime of normalization governing social and environmental performance. Drawing on Thompson’s (Ideology and modern culture: Critical social theory in the era of mass communication, 1990 ) modes of operation of ideology, we examine the extent to which, and how, the ideology of numbers is reflected on websites and public documents published by a range (...)
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