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  1. James Allan Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere, Grayden J. F. Solman & Daniel Smilek (2011). Challenge and Error: Critical Events and Attention-Related Errors. Cognition 121 (3):437-446.
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  2. J. Allan Cheyne, Grayden J. F. Solman, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2009). Anatomy of an Error: A Bidirectional State Model of Task Engagement/Disengagement and Attention-Related Errors. Cognition 111 (1):98-113.
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  3. James Allan Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2009). Absent Minds and Absent Agents: Attention-Lapse Induced Alienation of Agency. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):481-493.
    We report a novel task designed to elicit transient attention-lapse induced alienation of agency experiences in normal participants. When attention-related action slips occur during the task, participants reported substantially decreased self control as well as a high degree of perceived agency attributed to the errant hand. In addition, participants reported being surprised by, and annoyed with, the actions of the errant hand. We argue that ALIA experiences occur because of constraints imposed by the close and precise temporal relations between intention (...)
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  4. Heather Mann, Jason Korzenko, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Mike J. Dixon (2009). Time–Space Synaesthesia – A Cognitive Advantage? Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):619-627.
    Is synaesthesia cognitively useful? Individuals with time–space synaesthesia experience time units as idiosyncratic spatial forms, and report that these forms aid them in mentally organising their time. In the present study, we hypothesised that time–space synaesthesia would facilitate performance on a time-related cognitive task. Synaesthetes were not specifically recruited for participation; instead, likelihood of time–space synaesthesia was assessed on a continuous scale based on participants’ responses during a semi-structured interview. Participants performed a month-manipulation task, which involved naming every second month (...)
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  5. James A. Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2006). Absent-Mindedness: Lapses of Conscious Awareness and Everyday Cognitive Failures. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):578-592.
    A brief self-report scale was developed to assess everyday performance failures arising directly or primarily from brief failures of sustained attention . The ARCES was found to be associated with a more direct measure of propensity to attention lapses and to errors on an existing behavioral measure of sustained attention . Although the ARCES and MAAS were highly correlated, structural modelling revealed the ARCES was more directly related to SART errors and the MAAS to SART RTs, which have been hypothesized (...)
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