1. Jonathan S. Marko (2014). Justification, Ecumenism, and Heretical Red Herrings in John Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity. Philosophy and Theology 26 (2):245-266.
    This essay argues that Locke’s presentation of justification and the soteriological framework in which it is placed in The Reasonableness of Christianity is broad enough to encompass all “Christian” views on the topics except antinomian ones. In other words, the focus of the treatise is not Locke’s personal views of justification and the broader doctrine of salvation but an ecumenical statement of them. Locke’s personal conclusions on certain theological issues discussed in the opening pages of The Reasonableness of Christianity has (...)
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  2. Jonathan S. Marko (2010). Is Anthony Collins the Author of the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity? Philosophy and Theology 22 (1):77.
  3. Jonathan S. Marko (2010). Revisiting the Question. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):77-104.
    In this article I argue that the 1729 Dissertation on Liberty and Neces­sity should be attributed to Anthony Collins. This was the prevailing view until the publication of James O’Higgins’s 1970 biography of Collins. Since then, most have followed Collins’s modern-day biographer in denying that Collins penned the Dissertation. After reviewing O’Higgins’s six reasons for rejecting Collins as the author, I respond to the substantive issues in what follows. Part I is a historical positioning of the Clarke-Collins liberty-necessity debate where (...)
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