Search results for 'Jong-Ho Joh' (try it on Scholar)

781 found
Sort by:
  1. Jong-Ho Joh (2002). A Dilemma in Moral Education in the Republic of Korea: The Limitation of Individualistic Cognitive Approaches. Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):393-406.score: 870.0
    The purpose of this article is to identify a significant dilemma in current moral education in the Republic of Korea, which is influenced by rapid Americanisation, and to explore possible explanations for it. This dilemma is observed in the Korean language, family relationships and schooling in relation to tradition, as Korea is an ethnic nation sharing a common heritage. Various explanations are explored in terms of Korean historical, cultural and religious foundations. Korean people are confronting this current dilemma as beings (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kwŏn-su Hŏ (ed.) (2007). Husan Hŏ Yu Ŭi Hangmun Kwa Sasang. Suri.score: 180.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mae-Wan Ho & Peter T. Saunders (1993). Rational Taxonomy and the Natural System. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (4).score: 60.0
    Since Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, the idea of descent with modification came to dominate systematics, and so the study of morphology became subgugated to the reconstruction of phylogenies. Reinstating the organism in the theory of evolution (Ho & Saunders, 1979; Webster & Goodwin, 1982) leads to a project inrational taxonomy (Ho, 1986, 1988a), which attempts to classify biological forms on the basis of transformations on a given dynamical structure.Does rational taxonomy correspond to thenatural system that Linnaeus and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. H. L. Ho (2008). A Philosophy of Evidence Law: Justice in the Search for Truth. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The dominant approach to evaluating the law on evidence and proof focuses on how the trial system should be structured to guard against error. This book argues instead that complex and intertwining moral and epistemic considerations come into view when departing from the standpoint of a detached observer and taking the perspective of the person responsible for making findings of fact. Ho contends that it is only by exploring the nature and content of deliberative responsibility that the role and purpose (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Mae-Wan Ho (1998). On the Nature of Sustainable Economic Systems. World Futures 51 (3):199-221.score: 60.0
    A sustainable system has all the essential characteristics of an organism?an irreducible whole that develops, maintains and reproduces, or renews, itself by mobilizing material and energy captured from the environment. What is the nature of the material and energy mobilization that makes an organism? I begin with a brief description of a tentative theory of the organism?developed in detail elsewhere (Ho, 1993; 1994a; 1995a,b; 1996b,c)?as a dynamically and energetically closed domain of cyclic non?dissipative processes coupled to irreversible dissipative processes, which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. T. H. Ho (2014). Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Chien-Hsing Ho (2010). Nāgārjuna's Critique of Language. Asian Philosophy 20 (2):159-174.score: 30.0
    This essay attempts to provide a systematic reconstruction of Nāgārjuna's philosophical thought by understanding it as a critique of the attachment to linguistic expressions and their referents. We first present an outline of Nāgārjuna's philosophy, centering on such notions as 'dependent origination', 'emptiness' and 'self-nature'. Then we discuss Nāgārjuna's dismissal of a metaphysical use of language, particularly his contention that language can function well without assuming the reality of its referents. We also consider his statement that he has no assertion (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Y. F. Ho (1995). Selfhood and Identity in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):115–139.score: 30.0
  9. Jo Ann Ho (2010). Ethical Perception: Are Differences Between Ethnic Groups Situation Dependent? Business Ethics 19 (2):154-182.score: 30.0
    This study was conducted to determine how culture influences the ethical perception of managers. Most studies conducted so far have only stated similarities and differences in ethical perception between cultural or ethnic groups and little attention has been paid towards understanding how cultural values influence the ethnic groups' ethical perception. Moreover, most empirical research in this area has focused on moral judgement, moral decision making and action, with limited empirical work in the area of ethical perception. A total of 22 (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jonathan Jong & Aku Visala (forthcoming). Evolutionary Debunking Arguments Against Theism, Reconsidered. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.score: 30.0
    Evolutionary debunking arguments (EDAs) against religious beliefs move from the claim that religious beliefs are caused by off-track processes to the conclusion that said religious beliefs are unjustified and/or false. Prima facie, EDAs commit the genetic fallacy, unduly conflating the context of discovery and the context of justification. In this paper, we first consider whether EDAs necessarily commit the genetic fallacy, and if not, whether modified EDAs (e.g., those that posit falsehood-tracking or perniciously deceptive belief-forming mechanisms) provide successful arguments against (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Meaning, Understanding, and Knowing-What: An Indian Grammarian Notion of Intuition (Pratibha). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):404-424.score: 30.0
    For Bhartrhari, a fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher, all conscious beings—beasts, birds and humans—are capable of what he called pratibha, a flash of indescribable intuitive understanding such that one knows what the present object “means” and what to do with it. Such an understanding, if correct, amounts to a mode of knowing that may best be termed knowing-what, to distinguish it from both knowing-that and knowing-how. This paper attempts to expound Bhartrhari’s conception of pratibha in relation to the notions of meaning, understanding, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. M. W. Ho (1997). Quantum Coherence and Conscious Experience. Kybernetes 26:265-76.score: 30.0
  13. Chien-Hsing Ho (2007). Consciousness and Self-Awareness. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):213 – 230.score: 30.0
    In this paper I propose to inquire into the theory of self-awareness propounded by the two Buddhist epistemologists, Dignaga and Dharmakirti. I first give an outline of the Buddhist notion of consciousness, then deal with the notion of objectual appearance, and finally dwell on the theory itself together with certain arguments in its favor. It is shown that the Buddhists subscribed themselves to the following self-awareness thesis: that our waking consciousness is always pre-reflectively and nonconceptually aware of itself. Adopting an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Md Zabid Abdul Rashid & Jo Ann Ho (2003). Perceptions of Business Ethics in a Multicultural Community: The Case of Malaysia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):75 - 87.score: 30.0
    Leaders and managers of today''s multinational corporations face a plethora of problems and issues directly attributable to the fact that they are operating in an international context. With work-sites, plants and/or customers based in another country, or even several countries, representing a vast spectrum of cultural differences, international trade and offshore operations, coupled with increased globalisation in respect to political, social and economic realities, contribute to new dilemmas that these leaders must deal with. Not the least of these being a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Chien-Hsing Ho (2006). Saying the Unsayable. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):409-427.score: 30.0
    A number of traditional philosophers and religious thinkers advocated an ineffability thesis to the effect that the ultimate reality cannot be expressed as it truly is by human concepts and words. However, if X is ineffable, the question arises as to how words can be used to gesture toward it. We can't even say that X is unsayable, because in doing so, we would have made it sayable. In this article, I examine the solution offered by the fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). One Name, Infinite Meanings: Jizang's Thought on Meaning and Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):436-452.score: 30.0
    Jizang sets forth a hermeneutical theory of “one name, infinite meanings” that proposes four types of interpretation of word meaning to the effect that a nominal word X means X, non-X, the negation of X, and all things whatsoever. In this article, I offer an analysis of the theory, with a view to elucidating Jizang's thought on meaning and reference and considering its contemporary significance. The theory, I argue, may best be viewed as an expedient means for telling us how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Dien Ho (2008). When Good Organs Go to Bad People. Bioethics 22 (2):77-83.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Chien-Hsing Ho (2008). The Finger Pointing Toward the Moon: A Philosophical Analysis of the Chinese Buddhist Thought of Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):159-177.score: 30.0
    In this essay I attempt a philosophical analysis of the Chinese Buddhist thought of linguistic reference to shed light on how the Buddhist understands the way language refers to an ineffable reality. For this purpose, the essay proceeds in two directions: an enquiry into the linguistic thoughts of Sengzhao (374-414 CE) and Jizang (549-623 CE), two leading Chinese Madhyamika thinkers, and an analysis of the Buddhist simile of a moon-pointing finger. The two approaches respectively constitute the horizontal and vertical axes (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Vincent K. Y. Ho (2011). Medicine, Methodology, and Values Trade-Offs in Clinical Science and Practice. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):243-255.score: 30.0
    In recent years, society has come to recognize that the work performed by scientists, like that of journalists and politicians, may be influenced by the interests they serve. As a result, scientists' research is increasingly contested as a source of reliable knowledge. Such has been the case in issues concerning the climate debate, for example, where research results are at times perceived to comfortably fit in with the viewpoints of interested parties outside science. In medicine, governmental as well as commercial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Anita Ho (2008). The Individualist Model of Autonomy and the Challenge of Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):193-207.score: 30.0
    In recent decades, the intertwining ideas of self-determination and well-being have received tremendous support in bioethics. Discussions regarding self-determination, or autonomy, often focus on two dimensions—the capacity of the patient and the freedom from external coercion. The practice of obtaining informed consent, for example, has become a standard procedure in therapeutic and research medicine. On the surface, it appears that patients now have more opportunities to exercise their self-determination than ever. Nonetheless, discussions of patient autonomy in the bioethics literature, which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Scott J. Vitell & Foo Nin Ho (1997). Ethical Decision Making in Marketing: A Synthesis and Evaluation of Scales Measuring the Various Components of Decision Making in Ethical Situations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):699-717.score: 30.0
    The authors present a comprehensive synthesis and evaluation of the published scales measuring the components of the decision making process in ethical situations using the Hunt-Vitell (1993) theory of ethics as a framework to guide the research. Suggestions for future scale development are also provided.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Dien Ho (2010). Providing Optimal Care With Dirty Hands. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):16-17.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Hock Ho (2011). Paul Roberts and Adrian Zuckerman: Criminal Evidence. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):225-229.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. D. Christopher Ralston & Justin Ho (2007). Disability, Humanity, and Personhood: A Survey of Moral Concepts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):619 – 633.score: 30.0
    Three of the articles included in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy - Ron Amundson and Shari Tresky's "On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights"; Rachel Cooper's "Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?"; and Mark T. Brown's "The Potential of the Human Embryo" - interact (in various ways) with the concepts of disability, humanity, and personhood and their normative dimensions. As one peruses these articles, it becomes apparent that terms like "disability," "human being," and (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gabriel D. Donleavy, Kit-Chun Joanna Lam & Simon S. M. Ho (2008). Does East Meet West in Business Ethics: An Introduction to the Special Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):1 - 8.score: 30.0
    This article introduces and summarizes selected papers from the first World Business Ethics Forum held in Hong Kong and Macau in November 2006, co-hosted by the Hong Kong Baptist University and by the University of Macau. Business Ethics in the East remain distinct from those in the West, but the distinctions are becoming less pronounced and the ethical traffic flows both ways.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Dien Ho & Bradley Monton (2005). Anthropic Reasoning Does Not Conflict with Observation. Analysis 65 (285):42–45.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jonathan Jong (2013). Explaining Religion (Away?). Sophia 52 (3):521-533.score: 30.0
    In light of the advancements in cognitive science and the evolutionary psychology of religion in the past two decades, scientists and philosophers have begun to reflect on the theological and atheological implications of naturalistic—and in particular, evolutionary—explanations of religious belief and behaviour. However, philosophical naiveté is often evinced by scientists and scientific naiveté by philosophers. The aim of this article is to draw from these recent contributions, point out some common pitfalls and important insights, and suggest a way forward. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Cynthia Ho & Kylie A. Redfern (2010). Consideration of the Role of Guanxi in the Ethical Judgments of Chinese Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):207 - 221.score: 30.0
    The importance of personal connections and relationships, or guanxi when doing business with the Chinese is widely acknowledged amongst Western academics and business managers alike. However, aspects of guanxi-rehted behaviours in the workplace are often misunderstood by Westerners with some going so far as to equate guanxi with forms of corruption. This study extends earlier study of Tan and Snell: 2002, Journal of Business Ethics 41 (December), 361-384) in its investigation of the underlying modes of moral reasoning in ethical decisions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Liang-Hung Lin & Yu-Ling Ho (2010). Guanxi and OCB: The Chinese Cases. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):285 - 298.score: 30.0
    Studies of human resource and crosscultural management are gaining greater attention in international markets. In response to this trend, for multinational enterprises, understanding of the culture and values of other countries as well as their organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), which focuses on members' positive interactions for better achievements in organization, has gained importance. This study aims to explore the effects of national culture and guanxi on the OCB in Chinese society including mainland China and Taiwan. The results reveal that national (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. S. Honeybul, G. R. Gillett, K. M. Ho & C. R. P. Lind (2011). Neurotrauma and the Rule of Rescue. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):707-710.score: 30.0
    The rule of rescue describes the powerful human proclivity to rescue identified endangered lives, regardless of cost or risk. Deciding whether or not to perform a decompressive craniectomy as a life-saving or ‘rescue’ procedure for a young person with a severe traumatic brain injury provides a good example of the ethical tensions that occur in these situations. Unfortunately, there comes a point when the primary brain injury is so severe that if the patient survives they are likely to remain severely (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Wing-Chung Ho (2008). The Transcendence and Non-Discursivity of the Lifeworld. Human Studies 31 (3):323 - 342.score: 30.0
    This paper points to two little-discussed interrelated features—among sociologists—about the nature of the lifeworld (Lebenswelt): that the experience of transcendence is an essential component of human actions, and that lived experience (Erlebnis) is founded on the non-discursivity of the lifeworld, i.e., the pre-predicative background expectancies from which the discursive arises. I examine the intellectual route of Alfred Schutz who developed his mundane lifeworld theory from appropriating Edmund Husserl’s notions of appresentation and apperception. Harold Garfinkel later extended Schutz’s concept of lifeworld (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Foo Nin Ho, Hui-Ming Deanna Wang & Scott J. Vitell (2012). A Global Analysis of Corporate Social Performance: The Effects of Cultural and Geographic Environments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):423-433.score: 30.0
    As more and more multi-national companies expand their operations globally, their responsibilities extend beyond not only the economic motive of profitability but also other social and environmental factors. The objective of this article is to examine the impact of national culture and geographic environment on firms’ corporate social performance (CSP). Empirical tests are based on a global CSP database of companies from 49 countries. Results show that the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are significantly associated with CSP. In addition, European companies are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Anita Ho (2007). Disability in the Bioethics Curriculum. Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):403-420.score: 30.0
    While disability has emerged as a major theme in academic and political discourses, a perusal of many bioethics textbooks reveals that most editors and philosophers still do not consider disability to be central to developing either critical perspective or social conscience in addressing the core questions in bioethics. This essay explores how disability issues are typically portrayed in bioethics textbooks by looking at the examples of genetic testing and medically assisted death. It explains how incorporation of disability perspectives helps to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Dien Ho (2013). What's So Bad About Being a Zombie. Philosophy NOW 96 (96):8-11.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Robert W. McGee, Simon S. M. Ho & Annie Y. S. Li (2008). A Comparative Study on Perceived Ethics of Tax Evasion: Hong Kong Vs the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):147 - 158.score: 30.0
    This article begins with a review of the literature on the ethics of tax evasion and identifies the three main views that have emerged over the centuries, namely always ethical, sometimes ethical, and never or almost never ethical. It then reports on the results of a survey of HK and U.S. university business students who were asked to express their opinions on the 15 statements covering the three main views. The data are then analyzed to determine which of the three (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Wim J. van der Steen & Vincent K. Y. Ho (2006). Diets and Circadian Rhythms: Challenges From Biology for Medicine. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (4).score: 30.0
    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and gastrointestinal disorders such as stomach ulcers are often treated with drugs. NSAIDs, a common treatment in rheumatoid arthritis, may cause stomach ulcers which call for additional medications, notably antacids in the sense of drugs that suppress acid secretion by the stomach. Infection with Helicobacter pylori also plays a role in the ulcers. The infection is typically treated with antibiotics added to antacids. Considering NSAIDs and antacids, we suspect that overmedication is common to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jennifer Bell & Anita Ho (2011). Authenticity as a Necessary Condition for Voluntary Choice: A Case Study in Cancer Clinical Trial Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):33-35.score: 30.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 33-35, August 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. C. O. Sham, Y. W. Cheng, K. W. Ho, P. H. Lai, L. W. Lo, H. L. Wan, C. Y. Wong, Y. N. Yeung, S. H. Yuen & A. Y. C. Wong (2007). Do-Not-Resuscitate Decision: The Attitudes of Medical and Non-Medical Students. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):261-265.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Chien-Hsing Ho (2013). Ontic Indeterminacy and Paradoxical Language: A Philosophical Analysis of Sengzhao's Linguistic Thought. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):505-522.score: 30.0
    For Sengzhao 僧肇 (374−414 CE), a leading Sanlun 三論 philosopher of Chinese Buddhism, things in the world are ontologically indeterminate in that they are devoid of any determinate form or nature. In his view, we should understand and use words provisionally, so that they are not taken to connote the determinacy of their referents. To echo the notion of ontic indeterminacy and indicate the provisionality of language, his main work, the Zhaolun 肇論, abounds in paradoxical expressions. In this essay, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Wing-Chung Ho (2008). Understanding the Subjective Point of View: Methodological Implications of the Schutz-Parsons Debate. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (4):383 - 397.score: 30.0
    The bone of contention that divides Alfred Schutz and Talcott Parsons in their 1940–1941 debate is that Schutz acknowledges an ontological break between the commonsense and scientific worlds whereas Parsons only considers it “a matter of refinement.” Schutz’s ontological distancing that disconnects the “world of consociates” where social reality is directly experienced in face-to-face contacts, and the “world of contemporaries” where the Other is experienced in terms of “types” has been crucial to social scientists. Implicated in the break is that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Karen Ho (2001). Bacteriophage Therapy for Bacterial Infections: Rekindling a Memory From the Pre-Antibiotics Era. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (1):1-16.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Ger Snik & Johan De Jong (1995). Liberalism and Denominational Schools. Journal of Moral Education 24 (4):395-407.score: 30.0
    Abstract This paper discusses the problematic relation between liberalism and freedom of education, i.e. the right of (groups of) parents to found schools in which they can educate their children in accordance with their particular conception of the good life. First, the educational and philosophical backgrounds of the conflict between liberalism and freedom of education are explicated. Secondly, it is suggested that freedom of education can be considered a liberal value. The right to freedom of education is interpreted as a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Eline M. Bunnik, Antina Jong, Niels Nijsingh & Guido M. W. R. Wert (2013). The New Genetics and Informed Consent: Differentiating Choice to Preserve Autonomy. Bioethics 27 (6):348-355.score: 30.0
    The advent of new genetic and genomic technologies may cause friction with the principle of respect for autonomy and demands a rethinking of traditional interpretations of the concept of informed consent. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and micro-array based analysis enable genome-wide testing for many heterogeneous abnormalities and predispositions simultaneously. This may challenge the feasibility of providing adequate pre-test information and achieving autonomous decision-making. At a symposium held at the 11th World Congress of Bioethics in June 2012 (Rotterdam), organized by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Dien Ho (2012). Antidepressants and the FDA’s Black-Box Warning: Determining a Rational Public Policy in the Absence of Sufficient Evidence. Virtual Mentor--The American Medical Association Journal of Ethics 14 (6):483-488.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Chien-Hsing Ho (1996). How Not to Avoid Speaking. Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (5):541-562.score: 30.0
    Mahayana Buddhist philosophers’ attitude toward language is notoriously negative. The transcendental reality is often said to be ineffable. One’s obsession to apprehend the truth through words is an intellectual disease to be cured Attachment to verbal and conceptual proliferation enslaves oneself in the afflictive circle of life and death. Nevertheless, no Buddhist can afford to overlook the significance of language in preaching Buddhist dharmas as well as in day-to-day transactions. The point is not that of keeping silence. Rather, one should (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Lusina Ho & P. St J. Smart (2001). Re‐Interpreting the Quistclose Trust: A Critique of Chambers' Analysis. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (2):267-285.score: 30.0
    Dr Robert Chambers has recently argued that a loan on Quistclose terms does not actually create a trust, but rather the borrower receives the entire beneficial ownership of the funds subject only to a contractual right (enforceable by an injunction) on the part of the lender to prevent the loan being employed other than for the specified purpose. Chambers' approach, or at least something broadly similar, has received some obiter support from Potter LJ in Twinsectra Ltd v. Yardley. This article (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Anita Ho (2011). Trusting Experts and Epistemic Humility in Disability. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):102-123.score: 30.0
    It is often taken for granted that the professional–patient relationship is one of trust, particularly given that these clinicians are “experts” in their clinical domain. Nonetheless, trusting grants discretionary powers to the trustee, making the truster vulnerable to the trustee (Rogers and Ballantyne 2008). In particular, some patient groups carry certain social vulnerabilities that can be exacerbated when they extend trust to health-care providers (HCPs). Informed by the feminist literature on epistemic hierarchy and oppression, this paper examines how calls to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 781