8 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Joongol Kim (Gyeongsang National University)
  1. Joongol Kim (forthcoming). A Logical Foundation of Arithmetic. Studia Logica:1-32.
    The aim of this paper is to shed new light on the logical roots of arithmetic by presenting a logical framework (ALA) that takes seriously ordinary locutions like ‘at least n Fs’, ‘n more Fs than Gs’ and ‘n times as many Fs as Gs’, instead of paraphrasing them away in terms of expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’. It will be shown that the basic concepts of arithmetic can be intuitively defined in the language of ALA, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Joongol Kim (2014). Euclid Strikes Back at Frege. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):20-38.
  3. Joongol Kim (2014). The Sortal Resemblance Problem. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (3-4):407-424.
    Is it possible to characterize the sortal essence of Fs for a sortal concept F solely in terms of a criterion of identity C for F? That is, can the question ‘What sort of thing are Fs?’ be answered by saying that Fs are essentially those things whose identity can be assessed in terms of C? This paper presents a case study supporting a negative answer to these questions by critically examining the neo-Fregean suggestion that cardinal numbers can be fully (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joongol Kim (2013). What Are Numbers? Synthese 190 (6):1099-1112.
    This paper argues that (cardinal) numbers are originally given to us in the context ‘Fs exist n-wise’, and accordingly, numbers are certain manners or modes of existence, by addressing two objections both of which are due to Frege. First, the so-called Caesar objection will be answered by explaining exactly what kind of manner or mode numbers are. And then what we shall call the Functionality of Cardinality objection will be answered by establishing the fact that for any numbers m and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joongol Kim (2011). Frege's Context Principle: An Interpretation. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):193-213.
    This paper presents a new interpretation of Frege's context principle on which it applies primarily to singular terms for abstract objects but not necessarily to singular terms for ordinary objects.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joongol Kim (2011). A Strengthening of the Caesar Problem. Erkenntnis 75 (1):123-136.
    The neo-Fregeans have argued that definition by abstraction allows us to introduce abstract concepts such as direction and number in terms of equivalence relations such as parallelism between lines and one-one correspondence between concepts. This paper argues that definition by abstraction suffers from the fact that an equivalence relation may not be sufficient to determine a unique concept. Frege’s original verdict against definition by abstraction is thus reinstated.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joongol Kim (2010). Yi on 2. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (3):329-336.
    Byeong-Uk Yi has argued that number words like ‘two’ primarily function as numerical predicates as in ‘Socrates and Hippias are two (in number)’, and other grammatical uses of number words can be paraphrased in terms of the predicative use. This paper critically examines Yi’s paraphrase scheme and also some other alternative schemes, and argues that the adjectival use of number words as in ‘The Scots and the Irish are two peoples’ cannot be paraphrased in terms of the predicative use.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joongol Kim (2006). Concepts and Intuitions in Kant's Philosophy of Geometry. Kant-Studien 97 (2):138-162.
    This paper is an exposition and defense of Kant’s philosophy of geometry. The main thesis is that Euclidean geometry investigates the properties of geometrical objects in an inner space that is given to us a priori (pure space) and hence is a priori and synthetic. This thesis is supported by arguing that Euclidean geometry requires certain intuitive objects (Sect. 1), that these objects are a priori constructions in pure space (Sect. 2), and finally that the role of geometrical construction is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation