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  1. Charles M. Wharton & Jordan Grafman (forthcoming). Deductive Reasoning and the Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
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  2. Chad Edward Forbes & Jordan Grafman (2013). Social Neuroscience: The Second Phase. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  3. Chad Edward Forbes, Katherine A. Cameron, Jordan Grafman, Aron K. Barbey, Jeffrey Solomon, Walter Ritter & Daniel Ruchkin (2012). Identifying Temporal and Causal Contributions of Neural Processes Underlying the Implicit Association Test (IAT). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a popular behavioral measure that assesses the associative strength between outgroup members and stereotypical and counterstereotypical traits. Less is known, however, about the degree to which the IAT reflects automatic processing. Two studies examined automatic processing contributions to a gender-IAT using a data driven, social neuroscience approach. Performance on congruent (e.g., categorizing male names with synonyms of strength) and incongruent (e.g., categorizing female names with synonyms of strength) IAT blocks were separately analyzed using EEG (...)
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  4. Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza, Jorge Moll & Jordan Grafman (2011). Emotion and Social Cognition: Lessons From Contemporary Human Neuroanatomy. Emotion Review 3 (3):310-312.
    Two paradigms have guided emotion research over the past decades. The dual-system view embraces the long-held Western belief, espoused most prominently by decision-making and social cognition researchers, that emotion and reason are often at odds. The integrative view, which asserts that emotion and cognition work synergistically, has been less explored experimentally. However, the integrative view (a) may help explain several findings that are not easily accounted for by the dual-system approach, and (b) is better supported by a growing body of (...)
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  5. Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2009). Action and Mental Representation. The Prefrontal Cortex Stores Structured Event Complexes That Are the Representational Basis for Cognitively-Derived Actions. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  6. Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2009). The Prefrontal Cortex Stores Structured Event Complexes That Are the Representational Basis for Cognitively Derived Actions. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. 197--213.
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  7. Frank Krueger, Aron K. Barbey & Jordan Grafman (2009). The Medial Prefrontal Cortex Mediates Social Event Knowledge. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):103-109.
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  8. Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2006). Volition and the Human Prefrontal Cortex. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press.
  9. Eric M. Wassermann & Jordan Grafman (2005). Recharging Cognition with DC Brain Polarization. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):503-505.
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  10. Daniel S. Ruchkin, Jordan Grafman, Katherine Cameron & Rita S. Berndt (2003). Working Memory Retention Systems: A State of Activated Long-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):709-728.
    High temporal resolution event-related brain potential and electroencephalographic coherence studies of the neural substrate of short-term storage in working memory indicate that the sustained coactivation of both prefrontal cortex and the posterior cortical systems that participate in the initial perception and comprehension of the retained information are involved in its storage. These studies further show that short-term storage mechanisms involve an increase in neural synchrony between prefrontal cortex and posterior cortex and the enhanced activation of long-term memory representations of material (...)
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  11. Daniel S. Ruchkin, Jordan Grafman, Katherine Cameron & Rita S. Berndt (2003). Working Memory: Unemployed but Still Doing Day Labor. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):760-769.
    The goal of our target article is to establish that electrophysiological data constrain models of short-term memory retention operations to schemes in which activated long-term memory is its representational basis. The temporary stores correspond to neural circuits involved in the perception and subsequent processing of the relevant information, and do not involve specialized neural circuits dedicated to the temporary holding of information outside of those embedded in long-term memory. The commentaries ranged from general agreement with the view that short-term memory (...)
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  12. Jordan Grafman & Vinod Goel (2002). Neural Basis of Reasoning and Thinking. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan. 3--875.
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  13. Vinod Goela, David Pullara & Jordan Grafman (2001). A Computational Model of Frontal Lobe Dysfunction: Working Memory and the Tower of Hanoi Task. Cognitive Science 25 (2):287-313.
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  14. Mary Jo Rattermann, Lee Spector, Jordan Grafman, Harvey Levin & Harriet Harward (2001). Partial and Total‐Order Planning: Evidence From Normal and Prefrontally Damaged Populations. Cognitive Science 25 (6):941-975.
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  15. Jordan Grafman (2000). Structuring an Emotional World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):200-201.
    Rolls emphasizes the role of emotion in behavior. My commentary provides some balance to that position by arguing that stored social knowledge dominates our behavior and controls emotional states, thereby reducing emotions to a subservient role in behavior.
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  16. Charles M. Wharton & Jordan Grafman (1998). Cognitive and AI Models of Reasoning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):54-59.
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  17. Vinod Goel, Paolo Nichelli & Jordan Grafman (1997). What is the Locality Assumption and How is It Violated? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):519-520.
    We respond to Farah (1994) by making some general remarks about information encapsulation and locality and asking how these are violated in her computational models. Our point is not that we disagree, but rather that Farah's treatment of the issues is not sufficiently rigorous to allow an evaluation of her claims.
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  18. Eric M. Wassermann & Jordan Grafman (1997). Combining Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Neuroimaging to Map the Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (6):199-200.
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  19. Jordan Grafman, Arnaud Partiot & Caroline Hollnagel (1995). Fables of the Prefrontal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):349.
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  20. Jordan Grafman & James Hendler (1991). Planning and the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):563-564.
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