Search results for 'Jordan Silberman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jordan Silberman, Wynne Morrison & Chris Feudtner (2007). Pride and Prejudice: How Might Ethics Consultation Services Minimize Bias? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):32 – 34.score: 240.0
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  2. E. Jordan (1912). Dr. Jordan and Spencer's Unknowable: Reply. Philosophical Review 21 (3):359.score: 180.0
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  3. M. H. Jameson, D. R. Jordan & R. D. Kotansky (1996). A Lex Sacra From Selinous,(Borimir Jordan). American Journal of Philology 117:326-328.score: 180.0
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  4. Jeff Jordan (2006). Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Is it reasonable to believe in God even in the absence of strong evidence that God exists? Pragmatic arguments for theism are designed to support belief even if one lacks evidence that theism is more likely than not. Jeff Jordan proposes that there is a sound version of the most well-known argument of this kind, Pascal's Wager, and explores the issues involved - in epistemology, the ethics of belief, decision theory, and theology.
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  5. Rudolf[from old catalog] Jordan (2007). We Are Ancestors. Cartwright Pr.score: 60.0
    We are Ancestors or The Age of Responsibility by Rudolf Jordan CAPE TIMES LIMITED CAPE TOWN 1941 PREFACE THIS treatise outlines the Philosophy of Responsibility ...
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  6. Jeff Jordan (1995). Is It Wrong to Discriminate on the Basis of Homosexuality? Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):39-52.score: 30.0
  7. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Jeff Jordan (eds.) (1996). Faith, Freedom, and Rationality: Philosophy of Religion Today. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 30.0
    This collection of essays is dedicated to William Rowe, with great affection, respect, and admiration. The philosophy of religion, once considered a deviation from an otherwise analytically rigorous discipline, has flourished over the past two decades. This collection of new essays by twelve distinguished philosophers of religion explores three broad themes: religious attitudes of faith, belief, acceptance, and love; human and divine freedom; and the rationality of religious belief. Contributors include: William Alston, Robert Audi, Jan Cover, Martin Curd, Peter van (...)
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  8. Matthew Carey Jordan (2010). Bioethics and "Human Dignity&Quot;. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):180-196.score: 30.0
    The term "human dignity" is the source of considerable confusion in contemporary bioethics. It has been used by Kantians to refer to autonomy, by others to refer to the sanctity of life, and by still others (e.g., the President’s Council on Bioethics) to refer—albeit obliquely—to an important but infrequently discussed set of human goods. In the first part of this article, I seek to disambiguate the notion of human dignity. The second part is a defense of the philosophical utility of (...)
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  9. Matthew Carey Jordan (2013). Divine Commands or Divine Attitudes? Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):159-70.score: 30.0
    In this essay, I present three arguments for the claim that theists should reject divine command theory (DCT) in favor of divine attitude theory (DAT). First, DCT (but not DAT) implies that some cognitively normal human persons are exempt from the dictates of morality. Second, it is incumbent upon us to cultivate the skill of moral judgment, a skill that fits nicely with the claims of DAT but which is superfluous if DCT is true. Third, an attractive and widely shared (...)
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  10. Matthew Carey Jordan (2013). Liberal and Conservative Views of Marriage. Think 12 (34):33-56.score: 30.0
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  11. Jeff Jordan (2004). Divine Love and Human Suffering. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (2/3):169 - 178.score: 30.0
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  12. Jeff Jordan (1998). Pascal's Wager Revisited. Religious Studies 34 (4):419-431.score: 30.0
    Pascal's wager attempts to provide a prudential reason in support of the rationality of believing that God exists. The wager employs the idea that the utility of theistic belief, if true, is infinite, and in this way, the expected utility of theism swamps that of any of its rivals. Not surprisingly the wager generates more than a good share of philosophical criticism. In this essay I examine two recent objections levelled against the wager and I argue that each fails. Following (...)
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  13. Andrew Jordan & Stephanie Patridge (2012). Against the Moralistic Fallacy: A Modest Defense of a Modest Sentimentalism About Humor. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):83-94.score: 30.0
    In a series of important papers, Justin D’Arms and Daniel Jacobson argue that all extant neo-sentimentalists are guilty of a conflation error that they call the moralistic fallacy. One commits the moralistic fallacy when one infers from the fact that it would be morally wrong to experience an affective attitude—e.g., it would be wrong to be amused—that the attitude does not fit its object—e.g., that it is not funny. Such inferences, they argue, conflate the appropriateness conditions of attitudinal responses with (...)
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  14. Jeff Jordan (1994). The St. Petersburg Paradox and Pascal's Wager. Philosophia 23 (1-4):207-222.score: 30.0
  15. Jeff Jordan (2002). Pascal's Wagers. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):213–223.score: 30.0
    Pascal is best known among philosophers for his wager in support of Christian belief. Since Ian Hacking’s classic article on the wager, three versions of the wager have been recognized within the concise paragraphs of the Pensées. In what follows I argue that there is a fourth to be found there, a version that in many respects anticipates the argument of William James in his 1896 essay “The Will to Believe.” This fourth wager argument, I contend, differs from the better-known (...)
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  16. Andrew Jordan (2014). On Reasons, Evidence of Oughts, and Morally Fitting Motives. Philosophia 42 (2):391-403.score: 30.0
    In a series of papers, Stephen Kearns and Daniel Star defend the following general account of reasons: R: Necessarily, a fact F is a reason for an agent A to Φ iff F is evidence that an agent ought to Φ.In this paper, I argue that the reasons as evidence view will run afoul of a motivational constraint on moral reasons, and that this is a powerful reason to reject the reasons as evidence view. The motivational constraint is as follows: (...)
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  17. Jeff Jordan (2009). Review of William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion: Selected Writings , Edited by Nick Trakakis. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):495-496.score: 30.0
    ‘William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion’ edited by Nick Trakakis, collects 30 papers of William Rowe's important work in the philosophy of religion. I review this collection, and offer an objection of one of Rowe's arguments.
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  18. Jeff Jordan (2006). Does Skeptical Theism Lead to Moral Skepticism? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):403 - 417.score: 30.0
    The evidential argument from evil seeks to show that suffering is strong evidence against theism. The core idea of the evidential argument is that we know of innocent beings suffering for no apparent good reason. Perhaps the most common criticism of the evidential argument comes from the camp of skeptical theism, whose lot includes William Alston, Alvin Plantinga, and Stephen Wykstra. According to skeptical theism the limits of human knowledge concerning the realm of goods, evils, and the connections between values, (...)
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  19. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2007). The Role of Control in a Science of Consciousness: Causality, Regulation and Self-Sustainment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):177-197.score: 30.0
    There is quite a bit of disagreement in cognitive science regarding the role that consciousness and control play in explanations of how people do what they do. The purpose of the present paper is to do the following: (1) examine the theoretical choice points that have lead theorists to conflicting positions, (2) examine the philosophical and empirical problems different theories encounter as they address the issue of conscious agency, and (3) provide an integrative framework (Wild Systems Theory) that addresses these (...)
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  20. Robert Welsh Jordan (1974). Intentionality in General. Research in Phenomenology 4 (1):7-12.score: 30.0
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  21. Tim Jordan (1995). The Philosophical Politics of Jean-Franqois Lyotard. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):267-285.score: 30.0
    The systematic philosophical foundation for Jean-François Lyotard's postmodern and post-Marxist politics is described. The central principle of the right to create different "phrases" is uncovered and examined. The political consequences of this philosophical system are explored, leading to the conclusion that Lyotard's commitment to difference leads to political indifference. The philosophical roots of this indifference are detailed in Lyotard's Cartesian starting point and his analysis of Holocaust revisionism. This analysis reveals an idealist basis to Lyotard's philosophy of difference. Lyotard's concept (...)
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  22. Jeff Jordan (2001). Why Friends Shouldn't Let Friends Be Eaten: An Argument for Vegetarianism. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):309-322.score: 30.0
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  23. Andrew Jordan (2013). Reasons, Holism And Virtue Theory. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):248-268.score: 30.0
    Some particularists have argued that even virtue properties can exhibit a form of holism or context variance, e.g. sometimes an act is worse for being kind, say. But, on a common conception of virtuous acts, one derived from Aristotle, claims of virtue holism will be shown to be false. I argue, perhaps surprisingly, that on this conception the virtuousness of an act is not a reason to do it, and hence this conception of virtuous acts presents no challenge to particularist (...)
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  24. Matthew Carey Jordan (2011). Some Metaethical Desiderata and the Conceptual Resources of Theism. Sophia 50 (1):39-55.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that theists are extremely well-situated with respect to developing metaethical accounts that qualify as ‘robust’ versions of moral realism. In the first part of the essay, a number of metaethical desiderata are identified. In the second part, theistic strategies for accommodating those desiderata are explained and defended. The upshot is that, contrary to the received philosophical wisdom, there are good theoretical reasons for theistic philosophers to seek to develop metaethical accounts that ground moral facts in (...)
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  25. James N. Jordan (1969). Determinism's Dilemma. Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):48 - 66.score: 30.0
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  26. Jeff Jordan (1991). The Many-Gods Objection and Pascal's Wager. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (3):309-317.score: 30.0
  27. Elizabeth A. Behnke, Robert Welsh Jordan & Hubert Knoblauch (1986). Book Review. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 3 (1):79-90.score: 30.0
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  28. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2006). (Proto-) Consciousness as a Contextually Emergent Property of Self-Sustaining Systems. Mind and Matter 4 (1):45-68.score: 30.0
    The concept of contextual emergence has been introduced as a speci?c kind of emergence in which some, but not all of the conditions for a higher-level phenomenon exist at a lower level. Further conditions exist in contingent contexts that provide stability conditions at the lower level, which in turn accord the emergence of novelty at the higher level. The purpose of the present paper is to propose that (proto-) consciousness is a contextually emergent property of self-sustaining systems. The core assumption (...)
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  29. David A. Rettinger & Augustus E. Jordan (2005). Articles: The Relations Among Religion, Motivation, and College Cheating: A Natural Experiment. Ethics and Behavior 15 (2):107 – 129.score: 30.0
    A natural experiment was conducted studying the relations among student cheating, motivation, religiosity, and attitudes toward cheating. Students enrolled in a dual religious/college curriculum were surveyed regarding their cheating behavior, attitudes toward cheating, religiosity, and learning/grade motivations toward classes. Business and liberal arts college students were represented. Results strongly support the following conclusions. First, grade orientation is associated with increases in self-reported cheating. Second, among these religious students, more religiosity correlates with reduced reports of cheating in all courses. This result (...)
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  30. J. Scott Jordan (2003). Emergence of Self and Other in Perception and Action: An Event-Control Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):633-646.score: 30.0
    The present paper analyzes the regularities referred to via the concept 'self.' This is important, for cognitive science traditionally models the self as a cognitive mediator between perceptual inputs and behavioral outputs. This leads to the assertion that the self causes action. Recent findings in social psychology indicate this is not the case and, as a consequence, certain cognitive scientists model the self as being epiphenomenal. In contrast, the present paper proposes an alternative approach (i.e., the event-control approach) that is (...)
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  31. J. Scott Jordan (1999). “Mind is Brain” is Trivial and Nonscientific in Both Neurobiology and Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):842-842.score: 30.0
    Gold & Stoljar reveal that adherence to the radical neuron doctrine cannot be maintained via appeals to scientific principles. Using arguments from (1) naturalism and materialism, (2) unification, and (3) exemplars, it is shown that the “mind-is-brain” materialism explicit in the trivial version of the neuron doctrine ultimately suffers the same theoretical fate. Cognitive science, if it is to adopt an ontology at all, would be better served by a metaphysically neutral ontology such as double-aspect theory or neutral monism.
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  32. P. Jordan (1949). On the Process of Measurement in Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 16 (4):269-278.score: 30.0
  33. Jeff Jordan (1991). Why Negative Rights Only? Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (2):245-255.score: 30.0
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  34. E. Jordan (1941). The Role of Philosophy in Social Crisis. Ethics 51 (4):379-391.score: 30.0
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  35. Z. A. Jordan (1970). The Open Philosophy and the Open Society: A Reply to Dr. Karl Popper's Refutations of Marxism. By Maurice Cornforth. (Lawrence and Wishart, London, 1968. Pp. 396. Price 63s). [REVIEW] Philosophy 45 (171):78-.score: 30.0
  36. Mark D. Jordan (2005). Cicero, Ambrose, and Aquinas “on Duties”or the Limits of Genre in Morals. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):485-502.score: 30.0
    To compose a Christian book on exemplary Christian living, Ambrose appropriates and criticizes Cicero's book on "duties," "De officiis." In many passages within the moral part of his "Summa of Theology," Thomas Aquinas incorporates quotations from both Cicero and Ambrose. Comparison of the three texts raises issues about the relation of genres to terms, arguments, rules, and ideals in religious teaching. Genre becomes a useful category for analyzing religious rhetoric only when it is conceived as a set of persuasive or (...)
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  37. Robert Welsh Jordan (2001). Hartmann, Schutz, and the Hermeneutics of Action. Axiomathes 12 (3-4):327-338.score: 30.0
    Hartmann's way of conceiving what he terms "the actual ought-to-be [aktuales Seinsollen]" offers a fruitful approach to crucial issues in the phenomenology of action. The central issue to be dealt with concerns the description of the "constitution" of anticipated possibilities as projects for action. Such potentialities are termed "problematic possibilities" and are contrasted with "open possibilities" in most of the works published by Husserl as well as those published by Alfred Schutz. The description given by Alfred Schutz emphasized that the (...)
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  38. Jeff Jordan (2008). John Bishop Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. (Oxford:Clarendon Press, 2007). Pp. XII+250. £35.00; $65.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 920554. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 44 (2):238-242.score: 30.0
  39. J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (2007). Stable Instabilities in the Study of Consciousness: A Potentially Integrative Prologue? Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):viii-xii.score: 30.0
  40. Matthew Carey Jordan (2009). Theistic Ethics: Not as Bad as You Think. Philo 12 (1):31-45.score: 30.0
    Critics of theological accounts of the nature of morality have argued that such accounts must be rejected, even by theists, because such accounts (i) have the unacceptable implication that nothing is morally wrong in possible worlds in which atheism is true, (ii) render the substantive content of morality arbitrary, and (iii) make it impossible or redundant to attribute moral properties to God or God’s actions. I argue that none of these criticisms constitute good reason for theists to abandon theological accounts (...)
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  41. Jeff Jordan (1990). The Doctrine of Double Effect and Affirmative Action. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):213-216.score: 30.0
  42. Jeff Jordan (2001). Blocking Rowe's New Evidential Argument From Evil. Religious Studies 37 (4):435 - 449.score: 30.0
    The first part of this paper exposits William Rowe's latest version of the evidential argument from evil. Integral to this new version is what we can call the 'level-playing field' requirement, which regulates probability values. It is the argument of the second part of this paper that either the two premises of the new version are regulated by the level-playing-field requirement or they're not. If they are both regulated, then no one would be in position to rationally accept one (...)
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  43. Augustus E. Jordan (2001). College Student Cheating: The Role of Motivation, Perceived Norms, Attitudes, and Knowledge of Institutional Policy. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):233 – 247.score: 30.0
    Cheaters and noncheaters were assessed on 2 types of motivation (mastery and extrinsic), on perceived social norms regarding cheating, on attitudes about cheating, and on knowledge of institutional policy regarding cheating behavior. All 5 factors were significant predictors of cheating rates. In addition, cheaters were found lower in mastery motivation and higher in extrinsic motivation in courses in which they cheated than in courses in which they did not cheat. Cheaters, in courses in which they cheated, were also lower in (...)
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  44. Jeff Jordan (1996). Pragmatic Arguments and Belief. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):409 - 420.score: 30.0
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  45. Jeff Jordan (2012). The Topography of Divine Love. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):53-69.score: 30.0
    It is widely thought that God must love each and every human to the same depth and degree. This proposition plays a prominent role in influential versionsof the problem of evil, and in theistic attempts to answer the problem of evil. A common reason cited in support of the idea of God’s loving equally every human is that a perfect being would possess every great-making property and loving equally every human would be a great-making property. It is the argument of (...)
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  46. Phillip W. Gray & Sara R. Jordan (2012). Supervisors and Academic Integrity: Supervisors as Exemplars and Mentors. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):299-311.score: 30.0
    The inculcation of academic integrity among post-graduate students is an ongoing concern for universities across the world. While various researchers have focused on causal relations between forms of instruction, student characteristics, and possession of academic integrity, there is need for an increased examination of the role of supervisors in shaping student perceptions of academic integrity. Unlike the undergraduate level, where student interaction with professors is often limited, post-graduate students have an ongoing relationship with their supervisors, whether at the Masters or (...)
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  47. Elijah Jordan (1911). The Unknowable of Herbert Spencer. Philosophical Review 20 (3):291-309.score: 30.0
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  48. Andrew Jordan (forthcoming). Whole-Hearted Motivation and Relevant Alternatives: A Problem for the Contrastivist Account of Moral Reasons. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.score: 30.0
    Recently, Walter Sinott-Armstrong and Justin Snedegar have argued for a general contrastivist theory of reasons. According to the contrastivist account of reasons, all reasons claims should be understood as a relation with an additional place for a contrast class. For example, rather than X being a reason for A to P simpliciter, the contrastivist claims that X is a reason for A to P out of {P,Q,R…}. The main goal of this paper is to argue that the contrastivist account of (...)
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  49. Z. A. Jordan (1970). Theory and Practice: History of a Concept From Aristotle to Marx. By Nicholas Lobkowicz. (University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame – London, 1967. Pp. XVI 442. Price $8.95.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 45 (171):75-.score: 30.0
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  50. Matthew Carey Jordan (2012). Divine Attitudes, Divine Commands, and the Modal Status of Moral Truths. Religious Studies 48 (1):45-60.score: 30.0
    This essay presents a theistic account of deontic properties that can lay claim to many of the advantages of divine command theory but which avoids its flaws. The account, divine attitude theory, asserts that moral properties should be understood in terms of agent-directed divine attitudes, such that it is morally wrong for an agent to perform an action just in case God would be displeased with the agent for performing that action. Among the virtues of this account is its ability (...)
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