83 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Jeff Jordan [34]J. Scott Jordan [15]John Patrick Jordan [6]James N. Jordan [5]
Jessy E. G. Jordan [5]Jennifer Jordan [4]Jason Jordan [3]J. S. Jordan [2]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Jim Jordan
Profile: Joseph Jordan (Vanderbilt University)
  1. J. Scott Jordan, Dawn M. McBride & A. Potentially (forthcoming). Stable Instabilities in the Study of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jessy E. G. Jordan (forthcoming). Reconsidering Iris Murdoch's Moral Realism. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John Patrick Jordan (forthcoming). AIBS News. Bioscience.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mitchell Aboulafia, Victor Kestenbaum, Jason Jordan, Jacoby Adeshei Carter, Sarah Louise Scott, Richard Kenneth Atkins, Christa Hodapp, John Kaag, Shane Ralston & Kipton E. Jensen (2013). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). The Pluralist 8 (1).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jason Jordan (2013). Pragmatic Vs. Skeptical Empiricism: Hume and Dewey on Experience and Causation. The Pluralist 8 (1):31-62.
    All knowledge 'begins with experience,' but it does not therefore 'arise' from experience.The classical American pragmatists are usually considered to be either empiricists or heirs to the empiricist tradition in philosophy. This is unsurprising given the nature of the pragmatist philosophical program as a late nineteenth-and early twentieth-century reaction against transcendental idealism. Pragmatists sought to ground their inquiry resolutely in experience sans speculative metaphysics. However, the pragmatists were also stridently opposed to certain doctrines and epistemological tendencies in British empiricism that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jeff Jordan (2013). Rationality and Religious Commitment, by Robert Audi. Faith and Philosophy 30 (3):364-368.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeff Jordan (2013). The No-Minimum Argument and Satisficing: A Reply to Chris Dragos. Religious Studies:1-8.
    Chris Dragos has recently presented two objections to criticisms I've published against Peter van Inwagen's No-Minimum argument. He also suggests that the best way to criticize the No-Minimum argument is via the concept of divine satisficing. In this article I argue that both of Dragos's objections fail, and I question whether satisficing is relevant to the viability of the No-Minimum argument.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jessy E. G. Jordan (2013). Sabine Roeser, Moral Emotions and Intuitions. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (2):237-240.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jessy E. G. Jordan (2013). Thick Ethical Concepts in the Philosophy and Literature of Iris Murdoch. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (3):402-417.
    Although thick ethical concepts have been neglected in Murdochian scholarship, this article argues that they were central to the thought of Iris Murdoch. In the first section, the article provides a sustained account of thick ethical concepts in Murdoch's philosophy, demonstrating how these concepts align with and illuminate familiar aspects of her philosophical essays. The first section also explores the ways in which Murdoch's alternative account of moral concepts was at the heart of her overall attack on the noncognitivism of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. S. Jordan (2012). The Wild Ways of Conscious Will: What We Do, How We Do It, and Why It has Meaning. Frontiers in Psychology 4:574-574.
    It is becoming increasingly mainstream to claim that conscious will is an illusion. This assertion is based on a host of findings that indicate conscious will does not share an efficient-cause relationship with actions. As an alternative, the present paper will propose that conscious will is not about causing actions, but rather, about constraining action systems toward producing outcomes. In addition, it will be proposed that we generate and sustain multiple outcomes simultaneously because the multi-scale dynamics by which we do (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jaume Jordán, Stella Heras & Vicente Julián (2012). Case-Based Argumentation Infrastructure for Agent Societies. In. In Emilio Corchado, Vaclav Snasel, Ajith Abraham, Michał Woźniak, Manuel Grana & Sung-Bae Cho (eds.), Hybrid Artificial Intelligent Systems. Springer. 13--24.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jeff Jordan (2012). The Topography of Divine Love. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):53-69.
    It is widely thought that God must love each and every human to the same depth and degree. This proposition plays a prominent role in influential versionsof the problem of evil, and in theistic attempts to answer the problem of evil. A common reason cited in support of the idea of God’s loving equally every human is that a perfect being would possess every great-making property and loving equally every human would be a great-making property. It is the argument of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jennifer Jordan, Daniel A. Diermeier & Adam D. Galinsky (2012). The Strategic Samaritan. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):621-648.
    This research examines how two dimensions of moral intensity involved in a corporation’s external crisis response—magnitude of effectiveness and interpersonal proximity—influence observer perceptions of and behavioral intentions toward the corporation. Across three studies, effectiveness decreased negative perceptions and increased pro-organizational intentions via ethical judgment of the response. Moreover, the two dimensions interacted such that a response high in proximity but low in effectiveness led to more negative perceptions and to less pro-organizational intentions. This interaction was particularly pronounced if the corporation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jessy E. G. Jordan (2012). The Ghost of Prometheus. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):93-101.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jason Jordan (2011). Occasionalism. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jeff Jordan (2011). Is the No-Minimum Claim True? Reply to Cullison. Religious Studies 47 (1):125 - 127.
    Is the no-minimum claim true? I have argued that it is not. Andrew Cullison contends that my argument fails, since human sentience is variable; while Michael Schrynemakers has contended that the failure is my neglect of vagueness. Both, I argue, are wrong.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jessy E. G. Jordan (2010). The Indispensability of Tradition in the Philosophical Activity of Socrates. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:223-237.
    In this paper I argue that narratives concerning Periclean Athens have mistakenly imposed modern conceptions of enlightenment onto the Greek world,and have therefore been blinded to crucial aspects of Socrates’s practice of moral reason giving. In contrast to the Kantian conception of enlightenment, which puts forth an image of the ideally enlightened person as an autonomous reasoner, one who refuses to be guided by another and who has the courage to throw off the chains of tradition and “think for oneself,” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeff Jordan (2009). Review of William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion: Selected Writings , Edited by Nick Trakakis. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):495-496.
    ‘William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion’ edited by Nick Trakakis, collects 30 papers of William Rowe's important work in the philosophy of religion. I review this collection, and offer an objection of one of Rowe's arguments.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jeff Jordan & Gwen Roland (2009). Daniel Imhoff and Jo Ann Baumgartner (Eds.): Farming and the Fate of Wild Nature: Essays in Conservation-Based Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):145-146.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jennifer Jordan (2009). A Social Cognition Framework for Examining Moral Awareness in Managers and Academics. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):237 - 258.
    This investigation applies a social cognition framework to examine moral awareness in business situations. Using a vignette-based instrument, the investigation compares the recall, recognition, and ascription of importance to moral-versus strategy-related issues in business managers (n = 86) and academic professors (n = 61). Results demonstrate that managers recall strategy-related issues more than moral-related issues and recognize and ascribe importance to moral-related issues less than academics. It also finds an inverse relationship between socialization in the business context and moral awareness. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. J. Scott Jordan (2008). Toward a Theory of Embodied Communication: Self-Sustaining Wild Systems as Embodied Meaning. In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oup Oxford. 53.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jeff Jordan (2008). John Bishop Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. (Oxford:Clarendon Press, 2007). Pp. XII+250. £35.00; $65.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 920554. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 44 (2):238-242.
  23. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2007). The Role of Control in a Science of Consciousness: Causality, Regulation and Self-Sustainment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):177-197.
    There is quite a bit of disagreement in cognitive science regarding the role that consciousness and control play in explanations of how people do what they do. The purpose of the present paper is to do the following: (1) examine the theoretical choice points that have lead theorists to conflicting positions, (2) examine the philosophical and empirical problems different theories encounter as they address the issue of conscious agency, and (3) provide an integrative framework (Wild Systems Theory) that addresses these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (2007). Stable Instabilities in the Study of Consciousness: A Potentially Integrative Prologue? Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):viii-xii.
  25. J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (2007). The Concepts of Consciousness: Integrating an Emerging Science. Imprint Academic.
  26. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2006). (Proto-) Consciousness as a Contextually Emergent Property of Self-Sustaining Systems. Mind and Matter 4 (1):45-68.
    The concept of contextual emergence has been introduced as a speci?c kind of emergence in which some, but not all of the conditions for a higher-level phenomenon exist at a lower level. Further conditions exist in contingent contexts that provide stability conditions at the lower level, which in turn accord the emergence of novelty at the higher level. The purpose of the present paper is to propose that (proto-) consciousness is a contextually emergent property of self-sustaining systems. The core assumption (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jeff Jordan (2006). Does Skeptical Theism Lead to Moral Skepticism? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):403 - 417.
    The evidential argument from evil seeks to show that suffering is strong evidence against theism. The core idea of the evidential argument is that we know of innocent beings suffering for no apparent good reason. Perhaps the most common criticism of the evidential argument comes from the camp of skeptical theism, whose lot includes William Alston, Alvin Plantinga, and Stephen Wykstra. According to skeptical theism the limits of human knowledge concerning the realm of goods, evils, and the connections between values, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jeff Jordan (2006). Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. Oxford University Press.
    Is it reasonable to believe in God even in the absence of strong evidence that God exists? Pragmatic arguments for theism are designed to support belief even if one lacks evidence that theism is more likely than not. Jeff Jordan proposes that there is a sound version of the most well-known argument of this kind, Pascal's Wager, and explores the issues involved - in epistemology, the ethics of belief, decision theory, and theology.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jeff Jordan (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Pascal. Review of Metaphysics 58 (4):898-900.
  30. J. Scott Jordan (2004). The Role of “Prespecification” in an Embodied Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):408-409.
    Grush makes extensive use of von Holst and Mittelstaedt's (1950) efference copy hypothesis. Although his embellishment of the model is admirably more sophisticated than that of its progenitors, I argue that it still suffers from the same conceptual limitations as entailed in its original formulation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jeff Jordan (2004). Divine Love and Human Suffering. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (2/3):169 - 178.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. J. Scott Jordan (2003). Consciousness on the Edge: The Intentional Nature of Experience. Science and Consciousness Review 1.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. J. Scott Jordan (2003). Emergence of Self and Other in Perception and Action: An Event-Control Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):633-646.
    The present paper analyzes the regularities referred to via the concept 'self.' This is important, for cognitive science traditionally models the self as a cognitive mediator between perceptual inputs and behavioral outputs. This leads to the assertion that the self causes action. Recent findings in social psychology indicate this is not the case and, as a consequence, certain cognitive scientists model the self as being epiphenomenal. In contrast, the present paper proposes an alternative approach (i.e., the event-control approach) that is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jeff Jordan (2003). Evil and Van Inwagen. Faith and Philosophy 20 (2):236-239.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Steven Best, El Paso, James Bohman, Randall Collins, Mark Cooney, Diane Davis, Maria Epele, Capital Federal, Argentina Steven Epstein & Jennifer Jordan (2002). Acknowledgment of External Reviewers for 2001. Theory and Society 31 (149).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. J. Scott Jordan (2002). Deriving Intentionality From Artifacts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):412-412.
    Cognitive psychologists tend to treat intentionality as a control variable during experiments, yet ignore it when generating mechanistic descriptions of performance. Wynn's work brings this conflict into striking relief and, when considered in relation to recent neurophysiological findings, makes it clear that intentionality can be regarded mechanistically if one defines it as the planning of distal effects.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jeff Jordan (2002). Pascal's Wagers. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):213–223.
    Pascal is best known among philosophers for his wager in support of Christian belief. Since Ian Hacking’s classic article on the wager, three versions of the wager have been recognized within the concise paragraphs of the Pensées. In what follows I argue that there is a fourth to be found there, a version that in many respects anticipates the argument of William James in his 1896 essay “The Will to Believe.” This fourth wager argument, I contend, differs from the better-known (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. J. Scott Jordan (2001). The Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s Framework May Leave Perception Out of the Picture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):890-890.
    Hommel et al. propose that action planning and perception utilize common resources. This implies perception should have intention-relative content. Data supporting this implication are presented. These findings challenge the notion of perception as “seeing.” An alternative is suggested (i.e., perception as distal control) that may provide a means of integrating representational and ecological approaches to the study of organism-environment coordination.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jeff Jordan (2001). Blocking Rowe's New Evidential Argument From Evil. Religious Studies 37 (4):435 - 449.
    The first part of this paper exposits William Rowe's latest version of the evidential argument from evil. Integral to this new version is what we can call the 'level-playing field' requirement, which regulates probability values. It is the argument of the second part of this paper that either the two premises of the new version are regulated by the level-playing-field requirement or they're not. If they are both regulated, then no one would be in position to rationally accept one (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jeff Jordan (2001). Why Friends Shouldn't Let Friends Be Eaten: An Argument for Vegetarianism. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):309-322.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. J. S. Jordan (2000). Intentional Binding of Spatial Consciousness in Individuals and Groups. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S76 - S76.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. J. Scott Jordan (2000). The Role of" Control" in an Embodied Cognition. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):233-237.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jeff Jordan (2000). David O'Connor, God and Inscrutable Evil: In Defense of Theism and Atheism. Lanham, MD 1997. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (1):61-64.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Dr Kenneth A. Kovach, Jennifer Jordan, Karens Tansey & Eve Framiñan (2000). The Balance Between Employee Privacy And Employer Interests. Business and Society Review 105 (2):289-298.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. Scott Jordan (1999). “Mind is Brain” is Trivial and Nonscientific in Both Neurobiology and Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):842-842.
    Gold & Stoljar reveal that adherence to the radical neuron doctrine cannot be maintained via appeals to scientific principles. Using arguments from (1) naturalism and materialism, (2) unification, and (3) exemplars, it is shown that the “mind-is-brain” materialism explicit in the trivial version of the neuron doctrine ultimately suffers the same theoretical fate. Cognitive science, if it is to adopt an ontology at all, would be better served by a metaphysically neutral ontology such as double-aspect theory or neutral monism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Wayne L. Shebilske, Jeffrey A. Jordan, Barry P. Goettl & Eric A. Day (1999). Cognitive and Social Influences in Training Teams for Complex Skills. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 5 (3):227.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeff Jordan (1998). Pascal's Wager Revisited. Religious Studies 34 (4):419-431.
    Pascal's wager attempts to provide a prudential reason in support of the rationality of believing that God exists. The wager employs the idea that the utility of theistic belief, if true, is infinite, and in this way, the expected utility of theism swamps that of any of its rivals. Not surprisingly the wager generates more than a good share of philosophical criticism. In this essay I examine two recent objections levelled against the wager and I argue that each fails. Following (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. J. Scott Jordan (1997). Spatial Perception is Contextualized by Actual and Intended Deictic Codes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):750-751.
    Ballard et al. model eye position as a deictic pointer for spatial perception. Evidence from research on gaze control indicates, however, that shifts in actual eye position are neither necessary nor sufficient to produce shifts in spatial perception. Deictic context is instead provided by the interaction between two deictic pointers; one representing actual eye position, and the other, intended eye position.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jeff Jordan (1997). Religious Reasons and Public Reasons. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (3):245-254.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 83