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  1. Jan Hilgevoord & Jos Uffink, The Uncertainty Principle.
    Quantum mechanics is generally regarded as the physical theory that is our best candidate for a fundamental and universal description of the physical world. The conceptual framework employed by this theory differs drastically from that of classical physics. Indeed, the transition from classical to quantum physics marks a genuine revolution in our understanding of the physical world.
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  2. Richard Healey & Jos Uffink (2013). Part and Whole in Physics: An Introduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (1):20-21.
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  3. Jos Uffink (2013). Reply to Gao's “On Uffink's Criticism of Protective Measurements”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):519-523.
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  4. Jos Uffink (2013). Time and Aging: A Physicists Look at Gerontology. Mind and Matter 11 (1):101-126.
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  5. Igor Douven & Jos Uffink (2012). Quantum Probabilities and the Conjunction Principle. Synthese 184 (1):109-114.
    A recent argument by Hawthorne and Lasonen-Aarnio purports to show that we can uphold the principle that competently forming conjunctions is a knowledge-preserving operation only at the cost of a rampant skepticism about the future. A key premise of their argument is that, in light of quantum-mechanical considerations, future contingents never quite have chance 1 of being true. We argue, by drawing attention to the order of magnitude of the relevant quantum probabilities, that the skeptical threat of Hawthorne and Lasonen-Aarnio’s (...)
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  6. Michiel P. Seevinck & Jos Uffink (2011). Not Throwing Out the Baby with the Bathwater: Bell's Condition of Local Causality Mathematically 'Sharp and Clean'. In. In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao Gonzalo, Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann & Marcel Weber (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation. Springer. 425--450.
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  7. Jos Uffink (2011). Subjective Probabilityand Statistical Physics. In Claus Beisbart & Stephan Hartmann (eds.), Probabilities in Physics. Oxford University Press. 25.
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  8. Harvey R. Brown, Wayne Myrvold & Jos Uffink (2009). Boltzmann's H-Theorem, its Discontents, and the Birth of Statistical Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (2):174-191.
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  9. Jeroen van Dongen, Dennis Dieks, Jos Uffink & A. J. Kox (2009). On the History of the Quantum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (4):277-279.
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  10. Jos Uffink, Boltzmann's Work in Statistical Physics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  11. Jos Uffink, Dennis Dieks, Janneke van Lith & Geurt Sengers (2008). In Memoriam Hanneke Janssen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (4):917-918.
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  12. Jos Uffink, Compendium of the Foundations of Classical Statistical Physics.
    Roughly speaking, classical statistical physics is the branch of theoretical physics that aims to account for the thermal behaviour of macroscopic bodies in terms of a classical mechanical model of their microscopic constituents, with the help of probabilistic assumptions. In the last century and a half, a fair number of approaches have been developed to meet this aim. This study of their foundations assesses their coherence and analyzes the motivations for their basic assumptions, and the interpretations of their central concepts. (...)
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  13. Jos Uffink (2006). Insuperable Difficulties: Einstein's Statistical Road to Molecular Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (1):36-70.
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  14. Jos Uffink (2005). Introduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (2):219-223.
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  15. Harvey R. Brown & Jos Uffink (2001). The Origins of Time-Asymmetry in Thermodynamics: The Minus First Law. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):525-538.
    This paper investigates what the source of time-asymmetry is in thermodynamics, and comments on the question whether a time-symmetric formulation of the Second Law is possible.
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  16. Jos Uffink (2001). Bluff Your Way in the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (3):305-394.
    The aim of this article is to analyse the relation between the second law of thermodynamics and the so-called arrow of time. For this purpose, a number of different aspects in this arrow of time are distinguished, in particular those of time-reversal (non-)invariance and of (ir)reversibility. Next I review versions of the second law in the work of Carnot, Clausius, Kelvin, Planck, Gibbs, Caratheodory and Lieb and Yngvason, and investigate their connection with these aspects of the arrow of time. It (...)
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  17. Jos Uffink (1999). The Principle of the Common Cause Faces the Bernstein Paradox. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):525.
    I consider the problem of extending Reichenbach's principle of the common cause to more than two events, vis-a-vis an example posed by Bernstein. It is argued that the only reasonable extension of Reichenbach's principle stands in conflict with a recent proposal due to Horwich. I also discuss prospects of the principle of the common cause in the light of these and other difficulties known in the literature and argue that a more viable version of the principle is the one provided (...)
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  18. Jos Uffink & Janneke van Lith (1999). Thermodynamic Uncertainty Relations. Foundations of Physics 29 (5):655-692.
    Bohr and Heisenberg suggested that the thermodynamical quantities of temperature and energy are complementary in the same way as position and momentum in quantum mechanics. Roughly speaking their idea was that a definite temperature can be attributed to a system only if it is submerged in a heat bath, in which case energy fluctuations are unavoidable. On the other hand, a definite energy can be assigned only to systems in thermal isolation, thus excluding the simultaneous determination of its temperature. Rosenfeld (...)
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  19. Jos Uffink (1996). Nought but Molecules in Motion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 27 (3):373-387.
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  20. Jan Hilgevoord & Jos Uffink (1991). Uncertainty in Prediction and in Inference. Foundations of Physics 21 (3):323-341.
    The concepts of uncertainty in prediction and inference are introduced and illustrated using the diffraction of light as an example. The close relationship between the concepts of uncertainty in inference and resolving power is noted. A general quantitative measure of uncertainty in inference can be obtained by means of the so-called statistical distance between probability distributions. When applied to quantum mechanics, this distance leads to a measure of the distinguishability of quantum states, which essentially is the absolute value of the (...)
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