25 found
Sort by:
  1. Jos V. M. Welie (forthcoming). Perspective: Why Physicians? Reflections on The Netherlands' New Euthanasia Law. Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jos V. M. Welie (2012). Social Contract Theory as a Foundation of the Social Responsibilities of Health Professionals. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):347-355.
    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jos V. M. Welie (2003). Ignatius of Loyola On Medical Education. Or: Should Todays Jesuits Continue To Run Health Sciences Schools? Early Science and Medicine 8 (1):26-43.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jos V. M. Welie (2002). Why Physicians?: Reflections on The Netherlands' New Euthanasia Law. Hastings Center Report 32 (1):42-44.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jos V. M. Welie (2001). From Libertarian Die-Hard to Born-Again Christian. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):355-358.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jos V. M. Welie (2001). Living Wills and Substituted Judgments: A Critical Analysis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):169-183.
    In the literature three mechanisms are commonly distinguished to make decisions about the care of incompetent patients: A living will, a substituted judgment by a surrogate (who may or may not hold the power of attorney ), and a best interest judgment. Almost universally, the third mechanism is deemed the worst possible of the three, to be invoked only when the former two are unavailable. In this article, I argue in favor of best interest judgments. The evermore common aversion of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jos V. M. Welie & Sander P. K. Welie (2001). Is Incompetence the Exception or the Rule? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):125-126.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jos V. M. Welie & Sander P. K. Welie (2001). Patient Decision Making Competence: Outlines of a Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):127-138.
    In order to protect patients against medical paternalism, patients have been granted the right to respect of their autonomy. This right is operationalized first and foremost through the phenomenon of informed consent. If the patient withholds consent, medical treatment, including life-saving treatment, may not be provided. However, there is one proviso: The patient must be competent to realize his autonomy and reach a decision about his own care that reflects that autonomy. Since one of the most important patient rights hinges (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jos V. M. Welie (1999). €œDoctor, I Really Need Whiter Teeth!€. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):195-203.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jos V. M. Welie (1999). €œDo You Have a Healthy Smile?€. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):169-180.
    This article examines whether cosmetic interventions by dentists and plastic surgeons are medically indicated and, hence, qualify as medical interventions proper. Cosmetic interventions (and the business strategies used to market them) are often frowned upon by dentists and physicians. However, if those interventions do not qualify as medical interventions proper, they should not be evaluated using medical-ethical norms. On the other hand, if they are to be considered medical practice proper, the medical-ethical principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice and others hold (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jos V. M. Welie (1999). Let's Move Beyond Autonomy, Beneficence and Justice €” a Commentary to Viafora. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):305-308.
  12. Jos V. M. Welie (1999). Towards an Ethics of Immediacy A Defense of a Noncontractual Foundation of the Care Giver—Patient Relationship. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):11-19.
    In this article, I argue that the relationship between patients and their health care providers need not be construed as a contract between moral strangers. Contrary to the (American) legal presumption that health care providers are not obligated to assist others in need unless the latter are already contracted patients of record, I submit that the presence of a suffering human being constitutes an immediate moral commandment to try to relieve such suffering. This thesis is developed in reference to the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jos V. M. Welie (1998). Clinical Ethics: Theory or Practice? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (3):295-312.
    This article starts with a brief historical account of the ongoing debate about the status of clinical ethics: theory of practice. The author goes on to argue that clinical ethics is best understood as a practice. However, its practicality should not be measured by the extent to which clinical-ethical consultants manage to mediate or negotiate resolutions to ethical conflicts. Rather, clinical ethics is practical because it is characterized by a profound concern for the well-being of individual patients as well as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jos V. M. Welie (1998). May a Dentist Refuse to Treat an HIV-Positive Patient? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (2):163-169.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Urban Wiesing & Jos V. M. Welie (1998). Why Should Medicine Consider a Theory of Practice? Introduction to the Issue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (3):199-202.
    In reference to historical developments, this article introduces the topic of this special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, that is, the relationship(s) between theory and practice. The authors emphasize the need for scientific research in this neglected area for the sake of both clinical practice and medical education.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jos V. M. Welie (1997). Who Can Resist a Child's Appeal? Hastings Center Report 27 (1):10-10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jos V. M. Welie (1996). Non-Heart-Beating Organ Donation: A Two-Edged Sword. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 8 (3):168-179.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jos V. M. Welie (1995). Sympathy as the Basis of Compassion. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):476-.
  19. Jos V. M. Welie (1995). Viktor Emil Von Gebsattel on the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
    This article provides a summary overview of the ideas on medical anthropology and anthropological medicine of the German philosopher-psychiatrist Viktor Emil von Gebsattel (1883–1974), and discusses in more detail his views on the doctor-patient relationship. It is argued that Von Gebsattel''s warning against a dehumanization of medicine when the person of both patient and physician are not explicitly present in their relationship remains valid notwithstanding the modern emphasis on respect for patient (and provider) autonomy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jos V. M. Welie (1994). Authenticity as a Foundational Principle of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).
    Increasingly, contemporary medical ethicists have become aware of the need to explicate a foundation for their various models of applied ethics. Many of these theories are inspired by the apparent incompatibility of patient autonomy and provider beneficence. The principle of patient autonomy derives its current primacy to a large extent from its legal origins. However, this principle seems at odds with the clinical reality. In the bioethical literature, the notion of authenticity has been proposed as an alternative foundational principle to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jos V. M. Welie & Urban Wiesing (1994). Editorial. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Henk A. M. J. Have & Jos V. M. Welie (1992). Euthanasia: Normal Medical Practice? Hastings Center Report 22 (2):34-38.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jos V. M. Welie (1992). The Patient Self-Determination Act: A Legal Solution for a Moral Dilemma. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (01):75-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jos V. M. Welie (1992). European Bioethics Seminar: Health Care Issues in Pluralistic Societies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (689).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jos V. M. Welie (1992). The Medical Exception: Physicians, Euthanasia and the Dutch Criminal Law. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):419-437.
    The legalization of euthanasia, both in the Netherlands and in other countries is usually justified in reference to the right to autonomy of patients. Utilizing recent Dutch jurisprudence, this article intends to show that the judicial proceedings on euthanasia in the Netherlands have not so much enhanced the autonomy of patients, as the autonomy of the medical profession. Keywords: allowing to die, criminal law, euthanasia, law enforcement, legal aspects, legislation, medical ethics, medical profession, self determination, the Netherlands, voluntary euthanasia, withholding (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation