20 found
Sort by:
  1. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (2004). Avoiding Fallacies of Misplaced Concreteness in Medical Professionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):31-33.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2003). Determining Futility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (02):214-223.
    The challenge of determining that therapeutic intervention is futile is a recurrent ethical theme in critical care medicine. The process by which that determination is reached often involves demanding collaborative and interdisciplinary conversation and deliberation within the context of hospital policy, including ethics committee guidelines. The subsequent decision as to what happens next depends on resources, such as palliative care services, hospice, other hospital protocols, and, of course, family support.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (2002). Practicing Accountability in Professional Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (4):359.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2002). The Suicide Note. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):422-422.
    A 68-year-old gentleman is brought into a New York City ER at 2:30 P.M. by the squad in response to a 911 call from his neighbor, who found him unconscious in his bed. The cause of his condition is not known, but the man is unresponsive and requires immediate life support, including intubation, IV fluids, and pressors. Within minutes, his son arrives and attempts to deny permission for the LSMTx, claiming that his father is in end-stage ALS and has an (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2002). What Actually Happened. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):430-431.
    In this case, the patient's mother repeatedly asked about the health of any prospective child and whether she would be assured some custodial role. She also questioned the role of the prospective recipient. The committee facilitated obtaining the necessary information, sharing this information with the surrogate, and assisted the surrogate and two of her daughters to share both their feelings and additional information they possessed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2001). A Human Right to Healthcare Access: Returning to the Origins of the Patients' Rights Movement. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):285-298.
    The current concern with reforming and regulating managed care under the general rubric of has eclipsed the more fundamental need to legislate the human rights of those without adequate access to any healthcare. To characterize the regulatory activity as a movement inflates its moral dimension. The concept of carries a serious and powerful moral force that is currently inappropriately applied to the parochial concerns of a segment of the population privileged to have health insurance coverage. By contrast, the language of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2001). Keeping Human Rights on the Bioethics Agenda. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):223-226.
    The ideal of universal human rights is arguably the most potent moral concept marking the modern world. Its accelerated fruition in the last half of the twentieth century has created a powerful political force, laying the groundwork for future generations to extend and apply. Whereas anything resembling international legal status for human rights had to wait for the post-Nazi era, the bold proclamations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, 1948) loosened a revolutionary force with endless potential for application (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2001). The Integration of Health and Human Rights: An Appreciation of Jonathan M. Mann. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):231-240.
    Jonathan Mann was a pioneer in establishing communication between the world of public health and that of human rights activism. At the very start, he strongly believed that although each of these two fields was in the midst of separate paradigm shifts, these shifts are essential, perhaps causal, to the combined health and human rights movement.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Joseph C. D'oronzio (2000). The Infamous Farrell Footnote: Public Policy as the Smile of the Cheshire Cat. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):568-576.
    Was this just another incendiary sound bite, headline news banner attacking the airwaves? Getting it wrong? Overstating some small technicality for the sake of getting attention? No, to all of the above: the most incendiary aspect of the blurb was that it was accurate. And it did get attention.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1997). Health Policy Watch: Rappelling on the Slippery Slope: Negotiating Public Policy for Physician-Assisted Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):113-117.
    The rock climber and the law share in a common etymological allusion when each reaches a steep, high, and hard place. The climber “appeals” to the mountain by inching down on a rope and the law's “rappel” is similarly a route to more comfortable footing. Each step in this common process is germane to the eventual resolution, for it is to be found in the rappel process itself and in the meaning of each appeal.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1997). Matthew D, Bacchetta, MBA, MA, is a Member of the Class of 1998, Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York. Solomon R. Benatar, MB, Ch. B., FRCP, is Professor and Head of the Depart-Ment of Medicine and Director of the Bioethics Centre at the University of Cape Town, and Physician-in-Chief at Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6:370-371.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1997). Health Policy Watch: Ethical Obligations in the Body Politic: The Case of Normalization Policy for Marginal Populations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (04):480-.
    A common tale of moral cacophony and euphemism on the city streets:Each day, an owner of a small business decides, “once and for all,” how to respond to the “homeless person” panhandling for “spare change” as she makes her way to work in the morning. Today, she looks the other way and holds more tightly to her purse. Nearby, a building contractor waits impatiently for the traffic light to change as his van is approached by a small and shabby band (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1996). Health Policy Watch: Second, Let No Harm Be Done: An American Antiimmigration Dilemma. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (03):467-.
    Ongoing legislative proposals to overhaul United States immigration policy look very much like a new wave of nativism is sweeping the Congress. The movement, mounted in early 1995, is in full swing to limit immigrant populations from arriving, settling, producing, and benefiting as our parents' generations have done. Legislators and the courts are now considering the most complete antiimmigration social legislation since the decades following the First World War.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1996). Situation Ethics and Incremental Reform of American Health Delivery Systems. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (01):169-.
    The classic formulation of situation ethics in the 1960s was the result of the contention that the deductive application of general rules and principles in ethics was inherently flawed by the uniqueness of every situation. Quite often, ethical problems are problems precisely because existing rules do not apply four square to the singular situation at hand. There is a need, the argument ran, to assert the primacy of the special situation and to formulate a resolution of the unsettling circumstances appropriately (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1995). Health Policy Watch: “Unexpected” Death and Other Report Cards on Access and Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):549-.
    The era of managed care has arrived with portents of a new calculus to integrate cost and quality in health services. These devises such as “report cards” and “outcome measures” place performance against expectations and thus are expected to gauge the value of specific elements of healthcare delivery. From such measures and comparisons, the public will be able to better judge the appropriate, effective, and attractive place to seek their medical services. What is now widely used by utilization review, guiding (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1994). Bioethics and the Body Politic. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (02):300-.
    Has the private body of biethics become a microcosm of the body politic? Politics is ethics writ large. Ethics is politics writ small. However we turn it, the practice of bioethics is increasingly attuned to developments in public policy. The establishment of a “Health Policy Watch” in these pages is an invitation for research and reflection on these issues.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1994). Universal Access on the American Commons. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (04):627-.
    As the concept of universal access to healthcare comes to America, an ethical paradox emerges. “Access” is the code word for being assured that sick people without financial resources get appropriate medical care. There is an ethical imperative to provide care for the sick – whether paying or not – and this value ought to give direction to any reformed system.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joseph C. D'Oronzio & Albuquerque Board (1994). Bette Anton, MLS, is Associate Librarian in the Health and Medical Sciences Department, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley Catherine A. Berglund, B. Sc.(Psych), Ph. D., is an Associate Fellow in the Science and Technology Studies Department, University of Wollongong, Australia, and has Recently Been Awarded Her Doctorate for a Dissertation on Professional And. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3:496-497.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Joseph C. D'Oronzio, Dorothea Dunn & John J. Gregory (1991). A Survey of New Jersey Hospital Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 3 (5):255-268.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Carol J. Cohen & Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1989). The Question of Access. HEC Forum 1 (2):89-103.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation