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  1. Joseph F. Rychlak (1988/1987). The Psychology of Rigorous Humanism. New York University Press.
  2.  0
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1981). A Philosophy of Science for Personality Theory. Krieger Pub. Co..
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  3. Joseph F. Rychlak (1979). Discovering Free Will and Personal Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4.  12
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1994). Is Free Will a Process or a Content: Both? Neither? Are We Free to Take a Position on This Question? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):62-72.
    Comments on the views on free will offered by B. D. Slife , M. Gergen , R. N. Williams , M. S. Richardson , and G. S. Howard in light of the classical definition of FW as being capable of doing otherwise. It is argued that FW interpretations differ markedly depending on whether they are viewed as due to a process or to contents within some process. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  5.  9
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1998). Is There an Unrecognized Teleology in Hume's Analysis of Causation? Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):52-60.
    D. Hume's analysis of causation is critically analyzed in light of certain assumptions that he made regarding the classical Aristotelian causes. Using his widely cited analysis of billiard balls colliding and moving about as an example of how efficient causation is supposedly learned, the argument is made that Hume has overlooked the functioning of final causation in this learning. Thus, in order to understand how a learner might reason back from the presumed "effect" to the "cause" in efficient causation, we (...)
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  6.  2
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1958). Task-Influence and the Stability of Generalized Expectancies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):459.
  7.  5
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1973). The Well-Spring of Human Teleology. Philosophical Studies 22:180-189.
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    Joseph F. Rychlak (1990). Empirical Evidence of Aristotle's Concepts of Predication and Opposition. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):45-50.
    In the past four or five years I have been especially dependent on Aristotle's writings as I have initiated a series of experiments that can legitimately be called empirical efforts to prove Aristotelian conceptions to be true. In actuality, of course, I am trying to prove my own theory to be true—that is, worthy of consideration because it is consistent with observed human actions. However, by extension, I am surely seeking evidence for Aristotle's image of human cognition. There are two (...)
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    Joseph F. Rychlak (1986). The Meaning of “Psychological” in a Line of Theorizing. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):114-118.
    As I view theorizing to be identical to thinking and have offered extensive discussions elsewhere of the nature and function of "a" theory , I would like to address the question of what I look for in a psychological theory from the adjectivial side of the phrase 'psychological theory." The term "psychological" means to me a point of view, descriptive account, formal explication, etc., of human behavior encompassing introspective terminology, based on final causation, as framed in dialectically generated and evaluated (...)
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    Joseph F. Rychlak (1983). Free Will as Transcending the Unidirectional Neural Substrate. Zygon 18 (4):439-442.
  11. Joseph F. Rychlak (1991). Artificial Intelligence and Human Reason: A Teleological Critique. Columbia University Press.
  12. Joseph F. Rychlak (1976). A Summing Up. In Dialectic: Humanistic Rationale for Behavior and Development. S. Karger 126--141.
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  13. Joseph F. Rychlak (1980). Concepts of Free Will. Journal of Mind and Behavior 1:9-32.
     
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  14. Joseph F. Rychlak (1976). Can Psychology Be Objective About Free Will? Philosophical Psychologist 10:2-9.
     
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  15. Joseph F. Rychlak (1983). "Contribution to the Debate": Phenomenology and Empiricism. Analecta Husserliana 15:241.
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  16. Joseph F. Rychlak (ed.) (1976). Dialectic: Humanistic Rationale for Behavior and Development. S. Karger.
  17. Joseph F. Rychlak (1994). Four Kinds of Determinism and "Free Will": A Response to Viney and Crosby. New Ideas in Psychology 12:143-46.
  18. Joseph F. Rychlak (1997). In Defense of Human Consciousness. American Psychological Association.
  19. Joseph F. Rychlak (1996). Memory: A Logical Learning Account. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (3):229-50.
  20.  0
    Joseph F. Rychlak (1996). Must Behavior Be Mechanistic? Modeling Nonmachines. In William T. O'Donohue & Richard F. Kitchener (eds.), The Philosophy of Psychology. Sage Publications 149--156.
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  21. Joseph F. Rychlak (1991). Some Theoretical and Methodological Questions Concerning Harcum's Proposed Resolution of the Free Will Issue. Journal of Mind and Behavior 135 (1):135-150.
    Questions of both a theoretical and methodological nature are raised concerning Harcum's interesting paper on the resolution of the free will issue. The theoretical questions deal with the meaning of "free" as the supposed capricious disregard of environmental circumstances, the theoretical perspective from which agency is construed, the sort of causation that is involved, the choice of a predication model rather than a mediation model, and the role of opposition in framing alternatives. Methodological questions raised center on the role of (...)
     
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  22. Joseph F. Rychlak (1976). The Multiple Meanings of Dialectic. In Dialectic: Humanistic Rationale for Behavior and Development. S. Karger 1--17.
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  23. Joseph F. Rychlak (1978). The Stream of Consciousness: Implications for a Humanistic Psychological Theory. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum
     
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  24.  0
    Scott R. Sehon & Joseph F. Rychlak (1996). Logical Learning Theory: A Human Teleology and its Empirical Support. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):246.
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