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  1. Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind (2013). Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification of (...)
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  2. Joseph R. Herkert (2011). The Lincoln Teaching Fellows Program at the ASU Polytechnic Campus. Teaching Ethics 11 (2):1-5.
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  3. Joseph R. Herkert (2005). Ways of Thinking About and Teaching Ethical Problem Solving: Microethics and Macroethics in Engineering. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):373-385.
    Engineering ethics entails three frames of reference: individual, professional, and social. “Microethics” considers individuals and internal relations of the engineering profession; “macroethics” applies to the collective social responsibility of the profession and to societal decisions about technology. Most research and teaching in engineering ethics, including online resources, has had a “micro” focus. Mechanisms for incorporating macroethical perspectives include: integrating engineering ethics and science, technology and society (STS); closer integration of engineering ethics and computer ethics; and consideration of the influence of (...)
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  4. Joseph R. Herkert (2004). Engineering Ethics and Computer Ethics. Techné 8 (1):36-56.
  5. Joseph R. Herkert (2001). Commentary on “the Greening of Engineers: A Cross-Cultural Experience” (A. Ansari). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):120-122.
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  6. Joseph R. Herkert (2001). Future Directions in Engineering Ethics Research: Microethics, Macroethics and the Role of Professional Societies. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):403-414.
    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed—individual, professional and social—which can be further broken down into “microethics” concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and “macroethics” referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional engineering societies in linking individual and professional (...)
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  7. Joseph R. Herkert (1999). Concrete Ethics'. Science and Engineering Ethics 5:554-55.
     
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  8. Michael Pritchard, Taft H. Broome, Vivian Weil, Michael S. Pritchard, Joseph R. Herkert, Michael Davis & Taft Broome (1999). Introduction. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):541-567.
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  9. Joseph R. Herkert (1998). Sustainable Development, Engineering and Multinational Corporations: Ethical and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):333-346.
    This paper explores the concept of sustainable development and its ethical and public policy implications for engineering and multinational corporations. Sustainable development involves achieving objectives in three realms: ecological (sustainable scale), economic (efficient allocation) and social (just distribution). While movement toward a sustainable society is dependent upon satisfying all three objectives, questions of just distribution and other questions of equity are often left off the table or downplayed when engineers and corporate leaders consider sustainable development issues. Indeed, almost all the (...)
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  10. Joseph R. Herkert (1997). Collaborative Learning in Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):447-462.
    This paper discusses collaborative learning and its use in an elective course on ethics in engineering. Collaborative learning is a form of active learning in which students learn with and from one another in small groups. The benefits of collaborative learning include improved student performance and enthusiasm for learning, development of communication skills, and greater student appreciation of the importance of judgment and collaboration in solving real-world problems such as those encountered in engineering ethics. Collaborative learning strategies employed in the (...)
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  11. Margaret Anne Pierce, Jacques Berleur, Joseph R. Herkert, Dorothy E. Denning, Charles Dunlop & Chuck Huff (1996). Responses to “The Consequences of Computing”. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 26 (1):7-10.
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  12. Joseph R. Herkert (1991). Management's Hat Trick: Misuse of “Engineering Judgment” in the Challenger Incident. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (8):617 - 620.
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