Search results for 'Joseph S. King' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  16
    J. Robin King (1978). Thomas Mann's Joseph and His Brothers. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 53 (4):416-432.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Jason King (1998). Joseph Flanagan, The Quest for Self-Knowledge: An Essay in Lonergan's Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (6):419-420.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Lester S. King (1982). Book Review:The Philosophy of Medicine: The Early Eighteenth Century Lester S. King. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (1):149-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Lester S. King (1982). Medical Thinking a Historical Preface /Lester S. King. --. --. Princeton University Press, C1982.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  8
    S. King Joseph, Bibo Zheng Mix Xie & H. Pribram Karl (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3).
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  16
    Joseph S. King, Mix Xie, Bibo Zheng & Karl H. Pribram (2000). Maps of Surface Distributions of Electrical Activity in Spectrally Derived Receptive Fields of the Rat's Somatosensory Cortex. Brain and Mind 1 (3):327-349.
    This study describes the results of experiments motivated by an attempt to understand spectral processing in the cerebral cortex (DeValois and DeValois, 1988; Pribram, 1971, 1991). This level of inquiry concerns processing within a restricted cortical area rather than that by which spatially separate circuits become synchronized during certain behavioral and experiential processes. We recorded neural responses for 55 locations in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex of the rat to various combinations of spatial frequency (texture) and temporal frequency stimulation of their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Joseph E. King, Duane M. Rumbaugh & E. S. Savage-Rumbaugh (1998). Evolution of Intelligence, Language, and Other Emergent Processes for Consciousness: A Comparative Perspective. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  52
    Christopher S. King (2008). Wisdom, Moderation, and Elenchus in Plato's Apology. Metaphilosophy 39 (3):345–362.
    This article contends that Socratic wisdom (sophia) in Plato's Apology should be understood in relation to moderation (sophrosune), not knowledge (episteme). This stance is exemplified in an interpretation of Socrates' disavowal of knowledge. The god calls Socrates wise. Socrates holds both that he is wise in nothing great or small and that the god does not lie. These apparently inconsistent claims are resolved in an interpretation of elenchus. This interpretion says that Socrates is wise insofar as he does not believe (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9. Michael S. Berliner, Andy Bernstein, Harry Binswanger, Tore Boeckmann, Jeff Britting, Onkar Ghate, Lindsay Joseph, John Lewis, Shoshana Milgram, Amy Peikoff, Richard E. Ralston, Greg Salmieri & Darryl Wright (2005). Essays on Ayn Rand's Anthem. Lexington Books.
    The essays in this collection treat historical, literary, and philosophical topics related to Ayn Rand's Anthem, an anti-utopia fantasy set in the future. The first book-length study on Anthem, this collection covers subjects such as free will, political freedom, and the connection between freedom and individual thought and privacy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Stephen King (2010). Lewis's Fifth Floor: A Department Story. Liverpool University Press.
    This book contains remarkable photographs taken on the ‘lost’ fifth floor of Lewis’s by photographer Stephen King. They capture the remarkable history and former glory.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  5
    Jack O. Balswick, Pamela Ebstyne King, Kevin S. Reimer, Steve Barbone, Lee Rice & Martin Hemelik (2006). Abbas, Niran, Editor. Mapping Michel Serres. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005. Pp. Ix+ 259. Paper, $27.95. Achinstein, Peter. Scientific Evidence: Philosophical Theories & Applications. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005. Pp. Ix+ 286. Cloth, $49.95. Allard, James W. The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth. Cambridge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):131-34.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  4
    Anna S. King (2012). Krishna's Cows: ISKCON's Animal Theology and Practice. Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (2):179-204.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Lester S. King (1972). Chronicle From Aldgate: Life and Death in Shakespeare's LondonThomas Rogers Forbes. Isis 63 (1):119-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. J. S. King (1932). Life's Desire. New Blackfriars 13 (153):788-788.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. D. S. M., H. W. B. Joseph & H. L. A. Hart (1949). Knowledge and the Good in Plato's Republic. Journal of Philosophy 46 (22):719.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Gayatri Reddy, Indian Politics Hijras, Sherry Joseph, M. S. M. India, Undp Who & Anti-Sodomy Law (2003). Author (s)/Editor (s) Keywords Publication Date Publisher. Social Research 70 (1).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. H. W. S. & Joseph Ratner (1939). Intelligence in the Modern World. John Dewey's Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 36 (21):585.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  6
    D. A. Ress (1952). An Introduction to Plotinus Joseph Katz: Plotinus' Search for the Good. Pp. Ix+106. New York: King's Crown Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1950. Cloth, 16s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (02):82-83.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  14
    Patrick Hutchings (2007). Listening to Pictures. Sophia 46 (2):193-198.
    A review of Peter Steele’s: The Whispering Gallery: Art into Poetry, in which Steele writes poems on and to paintings and the sculpture Black Sun (By Inge King) in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Each work on which there is a poem is reproduced. In this book Steele writes more to the ‘contour’ of the topic-work than he did in Plenty. His poems – as ever sidenoted – are tensed between the topicality of the work of art (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Joseph Beatty (1978). Rosamond Kent Sprague. "Plato's Philosopher-King: A Study of the Theoretical Background". [REVIEW] Man and World 11 (1):211.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Jonathan Webber (2011). Joseph S. Catalano, Reading Sartre, Cambridge University Press, 2010, 213pp., $25.99 , ISBN 9780521152273. [Book Review]. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201102.
    Review of Joseph Catalano's book Reading Sartre.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  7
    Richard Bellon (2001). Joseph Dalton Hooker's Ideals for a Professional Man of Science. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):51 - 82.
    During the 1840s and the 1850s botanist Joseph Hooker developed distinct notions about the proper characteristics of a professional man of science. While he never articulated these ideas publicly as a coherent agenda, he did share his opinions openly in letters to family and colleagues; this private communication gives essential insight into his and his X-Club colleagues' public activities. The core aspiration of Hooker's professionalization was to consolidate men of science into a dutiful and centralized community dedicated to national (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  23.  22
    Sarah Moses (2009). "Keeping the Heart": Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.
    This essay considers eighteenth-century Anglican thinker Joseph Butler's view of the role of natural emotions in moral reasoning and action. Emotions such as compassion and resentment are shown to play a positive role in the moral life by motivating action and by directing agents toward certain good objects—for example, relief of misery and justice. For Butler, moral virtue is present when these natural affections are kept in proper proportion by the "superior" principles of the moral life—conscience, self-love, and benevolence—which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Ruth Birnbaum (1982). Joseph Ben Shem Tov's "Kevod Elohim": An Investigation Into the Summum Bonum of Man. Dissertation, Boston University Graduate School
    In his major philosophical opus, Kevod Elohim , written in Hebrew, Joseph ben Shem Tov investigates the summum bonum of man, which consists in the similarity to God's perfection called the "Glory of God" insofar as it can be realized by human nature. Opinions are divided, however, as to the nature of this greatest good. Some Jewish scholars claim that man's final purpose is in the observance of the 613 commandments of the Torah. According to the philosophers, the proofs (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  18
    Lawrence S. Moss (2001). Joseph S. Miller Lawrence S. Moss. Studia Logica 68:1-37.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Michael Gorman (2005). Augustine's Use of Neoplatonism in Confessions VII: A Response to Peter King. Modern Schoolman 82 (3):227-233.
    A modified version of Michael Gorman's comments on Peter King’s paper at the 2004 Henle Conference. Above all, an account of Augustine’s purposes in discussing Neoplatonism in Confessions VII, showing why Augustine does not tell us certain things we wish he would. In my commentary I will address the following topics: (i) what it means to speak of the philosophically interesting points in Augustine; (ii) whether Confessions VII is really about the Trinity; (iii) Augustine‘s intentions in Confessions VII; (iv) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Joseph de Finance (1954). DEFEVER, JOSEPH, S. J. "La Preuve Réele de Dieu". [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 32:291.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. G. S. Rousseau (1972). An Era of InterminglingThe Road to Medical Enlightenment 1650-1695Lester S. King. Isis 63 (1):103-106.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Konrad Lorenz (2002). King Solomon's Ring. Routledge.
    Solomon, the legend goes, had a magic ring which enabled him to speak to the animals in their own language. Konrad Lorenz was gifted with a similar power of understanding the animal world. He was that rare beast, a brilliant scientist who could write beautifully. He did more than any other person to establish and popularize the study of how animals behave, receiving a Nobel Prize for his work. King Solomon's Ring , the book which brought him worldwide recognition, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  30.  3
    Patrick Samzun (2016). Between Wrath and Harmony: A Biolyrical Journey Through L'Humanisphère, Joseph Déjacque's "Anarchic Utopia". Utopian Studies 27 (1):93-114.
    Joseph Déjacque was a sailor a mere nineteen years of age when he heard for the first time the gentle, “feminine” tone of anarchy: The voice was not of a woman; it was an odd officer’s soft words, not even “four words,”1 which did not command anything but instead permitted the things to be done and the sailors to do things their own way. Anarchy is not the absence of orders; it is the absence of butch command. And this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  65
    George Pavlakos, Niko Kolodny, Ulrike Heuer & Douglas Lavin (2011). Three Comments on Joseph Raz's Conception of Normativity. Jurisprudence 2 (2):329-378.
    This section is a discussion of Joseph Raz's Conception of Normativity introduced by Georgios Pavlakos.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  39
    Kenneth M. Ehrenberg (2011). Joseph Raz's Theory of Authority. Philosophy Compass 6 (12):884-894.
    Joseph Raz’s theory of authority has become influential among moral, political, and legal philosophers. This article will provide an overview and accessible explanation of the theory, guiding those coming to it for the first time as to its theoretical ambitions within the wider issues of authority, and through its intricacies. I first situate the theory among philosophical examinations of authority, and then explain the theory itself in detail.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  59
    Paula Gaido (2011). The Purpose of Legal Theory: Some Problems with Joseph Raz's View. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (6):685-698.
    This article seeks to clarify Joseph Raz’s contention that the task of the legal theorist is to explain the nature of law, rather than the concept of law. For Raz, to explain the nature of law is to explain the necessary properties that constitute it, those which if absent law would cease to be what it is. The first issue arises regarding his ambiguous usage of the expression “necessary property”. Concurrently Raz affirms that the legal theorist has the following (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  20
    Karsten R. Stueber (2006). How to Structure a Social Theory?: A Critical Response to Anthony King’s the Structure of Social Theory. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):95-104.
    s argument for the claim that social relations have to be conceived of as primary and main ontological category for an adequate analysis of the social realm. The author shows that King ’s arguments do not succeed in fully replacing the categories of agency and structure that are pervasive in contemporary social theory. At most, King succeeds in delineating a neglected area of social theory, something that should be taken into account in addition to structure and agency. Key (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  35
    Alan Donagan (1991). Moral Absolutism and the Double-Effect Exception: Reflections on Joseph Boyle's Who is Entitled to Double-Effect? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (5):495-509.
    Joseph Boyle raises important questions about the place of the double-effect exception in absolutist moral theories. His own absolutist theory (held by many, but not all, Catholic moralists), which derives from the principles that fundamental human goods may not be intentionally violated, cannot dispense with such exceptions, although he rightly rejects some widely held views about what they are. By contrast, Kantian absolutist theory, which derives from the principle that lawful freedom must not be violated, has a corollary – (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  14
    Robert B. Glassman (1983). Free Will has a Neural Substrate: Critique of Joseph F. Rychlak's Discovering Free Will and Personal Responsibility. Zygon 18 (1):67-82.
    . Ably marshalling ideas from theology, philosophy, and neurology, personality theorist Joseph F. Rychlak criticizes mechanistic psychologists' neglect of will and responsibility; these human qualities involve dialectically considering alternatives. I disagree with Rychlaks suggestion of fundamental mystery in the minds transcendence of the body and believe transcendent mind is intimately related to biological evolution and the brain. For example, dialectics, seen in simpler forms in lower animals, may require neural inhibition, feedback circuits, and topographic mappings. However, epistemologically speaking, neuroscientists (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37. Christopher Cunliffe (ed.) (1992). Joseph Butler's Moral and Religious Thought: Tercentenary Essays. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in this book mark the tercentenary of the birth of Bishop Joseph Butler, the leading Anglican theologian of the eighteenth century and also an important moral philosopher. They cover the full range of Butler's theological and philosophical writings--from his Christian apologetic against the deists to his discussion of the role of their historical context and suggestion of their relevance to contemporary religious and philosophical issues. At a time of renewed interest in Butler's thought, as well as in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  25
    Dror Ehrlich (2007). R. Joseph Albo's Discussion of the Proofs for the Existence of God. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 15 (2):1-37.
    In his Sefer ha-'Ikkarim [Book of Principles] R. Joseph Albo discusses Maimonides' proofs for the existence of God. The following paper offers an analysis of Albo's discussion of the proofs, advancing two theses: (1) Albo's main argument in his central discussion is that proofs for the existence of God cannot be based on the theory of the eternity of the universe. This argument, however, is contradicted by his other remarks on the topic, which appear elsewhere in the Sefer ha-'Ikkarim. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  3
    Ann Michelini (2000). The Search for the King: Reflexive Irony in Plato's Politicus. Classical Antiquity 19 (1):180-204.
    Platonic dialogues are self-concealing, presenting ideas by indirection or in riddling form, often exploring a difficulty or aporia without arriving at a solution. Since philosophers have begun to see Plato's work as imbued with irony, double meaning, and ambiguity, literary techniques that accommodate such layered meanings become a necessary adjunct to interpretation. The dialogue Politicus explores through an aporetic process a central Platonic concern, the relation between ideal and real. Close analysis of the important section dealing with law and constitutions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  14
    M. Jason Reddoch (2011). Philo of Alexandria’s Use of Sleep and Dreaming as Epistemological Metaphors in Relation to Joseph. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):283-302.
    Dreams are used figuratively throughout Greek literature to refer to something fleeting and/or unreal. In Plato, this metaphorical language is specifically used to describe an epistemological distinction: the one who has false knowledge or opinion is said to be dreaming while the one who has true knowledge is said to be awake. These figures are also central to Philo of Alexandria's philosophical language in De somniis 1-2 and De Iosepho. Although scholars have documented these epistemological metaphors in Plato and related (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  11
    T. K. Abbott (1887). Lexicons to the Greek Testament A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, Being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 726. 36s. Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. By Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated From the Latest German Edition by William Uewick, M.A. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 943. 38s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (04):106-109.
    A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. and T. Clark. 1886. 4to. pp. 726. 36s.Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. by Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated from the latest German Edition by William Uewick, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  5
    Lauren F. Pfister (2013). Sublating Reverence to Parents: A Kierkegaardian Interpretation of the Sage‐King Shun's Piety. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):50-66.
    In the Mengzi there is a hypothetical situation relating how the ancient sage-king Shun 舜 would respond if his father had committed murder. This has recently become a source of debate among Chinese philosophers. Here we will apply arguments made by Johannes de silentio (Kierkegaard's pseudonym) about the “teleological suspension of the ethical” related to the action of the biblical Abraham, and link them up to alternative interpretations of the actions of Shun. This challenges the current and traditional interpretations (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  5
    A. J. Musson (1999). Turning King's Evidence: The Prosecution of Crime in Late Medieval England. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (3):467-480.
    This paper provides a re-assessment of the significance of turning king's evidence in late medieval England through a re-examination of the use of approvers' appeals as a method of prosecution. It puts forward the hypothesis that the process was not only popular with felons, but also actively encouraged by the Crown. Exploring attitudes towards confessions and their admissibility, it compares and contrasts contemporary Continental prosecution practices and considers the extent to which the English legal system was developing a form (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  2
    Silvio A. Bedini (1993). Of ‘Science and Liberty’: The Scientific Instruments of King's College and Eighteenth Century Columbia College in New York. Annals of Science 50 (3):201-227.
    A measure of the interest in and extent of science teaching in colonial American colleges may be judged to a large degree by their investment in scientific instruments and apparatus. Fairly adequate records of acquisition of these teaching aids have been preserved by Harvard, Yale, William and Mary, and Dartmouth Colleges, and have been published. The scientific collections of other colleges that have not been previously studied are those of the College of Philadelphia , College of New Jersey , College (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  5
    Patricia Springborg (2011). Hobbes's Fool the "Insipiens", and the Tyrant-King. Political Theory 39 (1):85 - 111.
    Hobbes in Leviathan, chapter xv, 4, makes the startling claim: "The fool hath said in his heart, 'there is no such thing as justice,"' paraphrasing Psalm 52:1: "The fool hath said in his heart there is no God." These are charges of which Hobbes himself could stand accused. His parable of the fool is about the exchange of obedience for protection, the backslider, regime change, and the tyrant; but given that Hobbes was himself likely an oath-breaker, it is also self-reflexive (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  10
    G. L. Cawkwell (1981). The King's Peace. Classical Quarterly 31 (01):69-.
    Nothing about Xenophon's Hellenica is more outrageous than his treatment of the relations of Persia and the Greeks. It was orthodoxy in the circle of Agesilaus that Theban medizing, barbarismos, had sabotaged the plans for a glorious anabasis and recalled him to the defence of his city . Not until the Thebans woo and win the fickle favour of the King , does anything like detail emerge. In the regrettable interlude, the less said the better. If the third speech (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  9
    Dror Ehrlich (2007). R. Joseph Albo's Discussion of the Proofs for the Existence of God. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 15 (2):1-37.
    In his Sefer ha-'Ikkarim [Book of Principles] R. Joseph Albo discusses Maimonides' proofs for the existence of God. The following paper offers an analysis of Albo's discussion of the proofs, advancing two theses: Albo's main argument in his central discussion is that proofs for the existence of God cannot be based on the theory of the eternity of the universe. This argument, however, is contradicted by his other remarks on the topic, which appear elsewhere in the Sefer ha-'Ikkarim . (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  3
    Julie A. Davies (2012). Poisonous Vapours: Joseph Glanvill's Science of Witchcraft. Intellectual History Review 22 (2):163-179.
    (2012). Poisonous Vapours: Joseph Glanvill's Science of Witchcraft. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 163-179. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.693741.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Richard Smith (2014). Montage and Tableau in King Vidor's Stella Dallas. Film-Philosophy 18 (1):70-91.
    The final moments of King Vidor's melodrama, Stella Dallas is famous as a tableau of exquisite pathos and feeling. This paper examines Stanley Cavell's reading of Vidor's tableau of an unknown woman in relation to Linda Williams's earlier feminist reading, it examines Cavell's dispute with Williams and seeks to offer a different reading of the film that takes the contemporary art historical discourse about tableau as its guide, and comes to the conclusion that Vidor's tableau anticipates the 'return to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  1
    John Tinkler (1987). The Rhetorical Method of Francis Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII. History and Theory 26 (1):32-52.
    Classical rhetorical theory distinguished three kinds of genera of oratory - the judicial, the deliberative, and the demonstrative- and there are features of each in Francis Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII. The demonstrative genus provided the basic shape of classical and humanist rhetorical history, while the deliberative and judicial methods also contributed significantly. The judicial method in particular may be very important for modern standards of history-writing. The fact that Bacon employed rhetorical strategies to shape (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000