Search results for 'Joseph Simonian' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joseph Simonian (2005). The Paradoxes of Chemical Classification: Why `Water is H2o' is Not an Identity Statement. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (1):49-56.score: 240.0
    A puzzle for identity statements using massnouns, central to the expression of chemicaltypes, arises if one accepts that both `Wateris H2O' and `Ice is H2O' are identitystatements, since they jointly entail that`Water is ice'. The puzzle is resolved if itcan be shown that the `is' of such statementsis not the `is' of identity.
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  2. H. W. B. Joseph (1938). Order and Life. By Joseph Needham, Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, and Sir William Dunn Reader in Biochemistry, Cambridge. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1936. Pp. X + 178. Price 8s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (49):93-.score: 180.0
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  3. Credit Risk (2011). Joseph Simonian 840 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660, USA; Email: Joseph. Simonian@ Pimco. Com. Mind 13 (3).score: 150.0
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  4. Terence Rajivan Edward (2013). Joseph Raz on the Problem of the Amoralist. Abstracta 7 (1):85-93.score: 24.0
    Joseph Raz has argued that the problem of the amoralist is misconceived. In this paper, I present three interpretations of what his argument is. None of these interpretations yields an argument that we are in a position to accept.
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  5. Matthew Walhout (2010). Looking to Charles Taylor and Joseph Rouse for Best Practices in Science and Religion. Zygon 45 (3):558-574.score: 24.0
    People discussing science and religion usually frame their conversations in terms of essentialist assumptions about science, assumptions requiring the existence (but not the specification) of criteria according to which science can be distinguished from other forms of inquiry. However, criteria functioning at a level of generality appropriate to such discussions may not exist at all. Essentialist assumptions may be avoided if science is understood within a broader context of human practices. In a philosophy of practices, to label a practice as (...)
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  6. Gary Richmond & Ben Udell (2014). Joseph Ransdell and the Communicational Process of Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (4):457-466.score: 24.0
    Joseph Morton Ransdell left a record of experimentation with the communicational process of philosophy from 1992 to his passing in 2010. This record includes the Arisbe website and the peirce-l e-forum and its archives, of which the earliest are not on the Internet, but may yet be recovered and made available. Philosophy’s communication process, and the possibility of creating and developing a telecommunity, as Ransdell called it, were among his chief theoretical and practical interests. Such interests were focused in (...)
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  7. James R. Griesemer (1990). Modeling in the Museum: On the Role of Remnant Models in the Work of Joseph Grinnell. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 5 (1):3-36.score: 24.0
    Accounts of the relation between theories and models in biology concentrate on mathematical models. In this paper I consider the dual role of models as representations of natural systems and as a material basis for theorizing. In order to explicate the dual role, I develop the concept of a remnant model, a material entity made from parts of the natural system(s) under study. I present a case study of an important but neglected naturalist, Joseph Grinnell, to illustrate the extent (...)
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  8. Sarah Moses (2009). "Keeping the Heart": Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.score: 24.0
    This essay considers eighteenth-century Anglican thinker Joseph Butler's view of the role of natural emotions in moral reasoning and action. Emotions such as compassion and resentment are shown to play a positive role in the moral life by motivating action and by directing agents toward certain good objects—for example, relief of misery and justice. For Butler, moral virtue is present when these natural affections are kept in proper proportion by the "superior" principles of the moral life—conscience, self-love, and benevolence—which (...)
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  9. Martin Clifford Underwood (2009). Joseph Rotblat and the Moral Responsibilities of the Scientist. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):129-134.score: 24.0
    Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished scientists and peace campaigners of the post second world war period. He made significant contributions to nuclear physics and worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He then became one of the world’s leading researchers into the biological effects of radiation. His life from the early 1950s until his death in August 2005 was devoted to the abolition of nuclear weapons and peace. For this he was awarded the (...)
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  10. Martin C. Underwood (2013). Joseph Rotblat, the Bomb and Anomalies From His Archive. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):487-490.score: 24.0
    Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat made significant contributions to nuclear physics and worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He walked out of the Manhattan Project after working there for less than a year, the only scientist to do so. Rotblat gave a comprehensive account of his time at Los Alamos. His Archive is now becoming available and papers contained therein are inconsistent with some aspects of his account. The reasons as to how such anomalies and contradictions could occur (...)
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  11. Richard Bellon (2006). Joseph Hooker Takes a "Fixed Post": Transmutation and the "Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany", 1844-1860. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1 - 39.score: 24.0
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for special (...)
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  12. Jim Endersby (2011). A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.score: 24.0
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward (...)
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  13. Richard Bellon (2001). Joseph Dalton Hooker's Ideals for a Professional Man of Science. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):51 - 82.score: 24.0
    During the 1840s and the 1850s botanist Joseph Hooker developed distinct notions about the proper characteristics of a professional man of science. While he never articulated these ideas publicly as a coherent agenda, he did share his opinions openly in letters to family and colleagues; this private communication gives essential insight into his and his X-Club colleagues' public activities. The core aspiration of Hooker's professionalization was to consolidate men of science into a dutiful and centralized community dedicated to national (...)
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  14. Gabriel Ernesto Andrade (2006). El problema de la teodicea en el pensamiento de Joseph de Maistre. 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 11:71-92.score: 24.0
    El problema de la teodicea ha sido una de las grandes preocupaciones del pensamiento religioso en Occidente: si Dios es absolutamente bueno y omnipotente, ¿cómo puede existir el mal en el mundo?, y ¿por qué sufren los virtuosos y gozan los impíos? En la Antigüedad, el Libro de Job intentó ofrecer una respuesta que perduró hasta tiempos modernos. En el siglo XVII, Leibniz ofreció una respuesta mucho más racionalizada, propia de los tiempos modernos. Joseph de Maistre, un contrarrevolucionario del (...)
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  15. Catherine Legg (2014). “The Meaning of a Thought is Altogether Something Virtual”: Joseph Ransdell and His Legacy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (4):451-456,.score: 24.0
    Joseph Ransdell (1931–2010), who received his Ph.D in philosophy from Columbia University in 1966, where he was advised by Sidney Morgenbesser, and spent most of his career at Texas Tech University, offered an original and focused challenge to academic philosophy at the end of the Second Millennium. His guiding philosophical passion was understanding how communication might best encourage and support truth seeking. This introduction to a special edition of the Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society which is devoted (...)
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  16. Ivona Kollárová (2013). The Reading Ideal and Reading Preferences in the Age of Joseph II. Human Affairs 23 (3):344-358.score: 21.0
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  17. Alan Tapper (2002). Joseph Priestley. In Philip B. Dematteis Peter S. Fosl (ed.), British Philosophers 1500–1799. 307-23.score: 21.0
  18. Joseph Raz (1997). The Active and the Passive: Joseph Raz. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):211–228.score: 18.0
  19. Paula Gaido (2011). The Purpose of Legal Theory: Some Problems with Joseph Raz's View. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (6):685-698.score: 18.0
    This article seeks to clarify Joseph Raz’s contention that the task of the legal theorist is to explain the nature of law, rather than the concept of law. For Raz, to explain the nature of law is to explain the necessary properties that constitute it, those which if absent law would cease to be what it is. The first issue arises regarding his ambiguous usage of the expression “necessary property”. Concurrently Raz affirms that the legal theorist has the following (...)
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  20. Alasdair Macintyre & Joseph Dunne (2002). Alasdair Macintyre on Education: In Dialogue with Joseph Dunne. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (1):1–19.score: 18.0
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  21. George Pavlakos, Douglas Lavin, Niko Kolodny & Ulrike Heuer (2012). Discussion: Three Comments on Joseph Raz's Conception of Normativity. Jurisprudence 2 (2):329-378.score: 18.0
    This section is a discussion of Joseph Raz's Conception of Normativity introduced by Georgios Pavlakos.
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  22. Arthur J. Dyck & Carlos Padilla (2009). The Empathic Emotions and Self-Love in Bishop Joseph Butler and the Neurosciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):577-612.score: 18.0
    In Joseph Butler, we have an account of human beings as moral beings that is, as this essay demonstrates, being supported by the recently emerging findings of the neurosciences. This applies particularly to Butler's portrayal of our empathic emotions. Butler discovered their moral significance for motivating and guiding moral decisions and actions before the neurosciences did. Butler has, in essence, added a sixth sense to our five senses: this is the moral sense by means of which we perceive what (...)
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  23. Joseph Mendola (2009). Review of Joseph Heath, Following the Rules: Practical Reasoning and Deontic Constraint. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).score: 18.0
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  24. Hartley Lachter (2008). Kabbalah, Philosophy, and the Jewish-Christian Debate: Reconsidering the Early Works of Joseph Gikatilla. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 16 (1):1-58.score: 18.0
    Joseph Gikatilla's early works, composed during the 1270s, have been understood by many scholars as a fusion of Kabbalah and philosophy—an approach that he abandoned in his later compositions. This paper argues that Gikatilla's early works are in fact consistent with his later works, and that the differences between the two can be explained by the polemical engagement during his early period with Jewish philosophy and Christian missionizing. By subtly drawing Jewish students of philosophy away from Aristotelian speculation and (...)
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  25. Alan Donagan (1991). Moral Absolutism and the Double-Effect Exception: Reflections on Joseph Boyle's Who is Entitled to Double-Effect? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (5):495-509.score: 18.0
    Joseph Boyle raises important questions about the place of the double-effect exception in absolutist moral theories. His own absolutist theory (held by many, but not all, Catholic moralists), which derives from the principles that fundamental human goods may not be intentionally violated, cannot dispense with such exceptions, although he rightly rejects some widely held views about what they are. By contrast, Kantian absolutist theory, which derives from the principle that lawful freedom must not be violated, has a corollary – (...)
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  26. T. Bloom (2009). Just Open Borders? Examining Joseph Carens' Open Borders Argument in the Light of a Case Study of Recent Somali Migrants to the Uk. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):231 – 243.score: 18.0
    This essay examines Joseph Carens' open borders argument in the light of a case study of recent Somali migrants to the UK. It argues that, although arguments for significantly more open borders are compelling, they must take into account existing domestic injustice in receiving states as well as existing global injustice.
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  27. Lucy Ransdell (2014). On Joseph Ransdell. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (4):449-450,.score: 18.0
    My father would have loved the idea of me writing this introduction on behalf of my family, a task which is, to be frank, a little intimidating, given this audience that he held in such high esteem. My father’s mind could take him anywhere, to many places where—especially in the last year of his life—his body could not. Anyone lucky enough to have conversed with him knows that with Dr. Joseph Ransdell (Joe to many, and Dad to his daughters), (...)
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  28. Dror Ehrlich (2007). R. Joseph Albo's Discussion of the Proofs for the Existence of God. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 15 (2):1-37.score: 18.0
    In his Sefer ha-'Ikkarim [Book of Principles] R. Joseph Albo discusses Maimonides' proofs for the existence of God. The following paper offers an analysis of Albo's discussion of the proofs, advancing two theses: (1) Albo's main argument in his central discussion is that proofs for the existence of God cannot be based on the theory of the eternity of the universe. This argument, however, is contradicted by his other remarks on the topic, which appear elsewhere in the Sefer ha-'Ikkarim. (...)
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  29. R. Jay Wallace (ed.) (2004). Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Reason and Value collects 15 new papers by leading contemporary philosophers on themes from the work of Joseph Raz. Raz has made major contributions in a wide range of areas, including jurisprudence, political philosophy, and the theory of practical reason; but all of his work displays a deep engagement with central themes in moral philosophy. The subtlety and power of Raz's reflections on ethical topics make his writings a fertile source for anyone working in this area. Especially significant are (...)
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  30. Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2003). Rights, Culture, and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The volume brings together a collection of original papers on some of the main tenets of Joseph Raz's legal and political philosophy: Legal positivism and the nature of law, practical reason, authority, the value of equality, incommensurability, harm, group rights, and multiculturalism.
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  31. Leon J. Niemoczynski (2012). The One, the Many, and the Trinity: Joseph A. Bracken and the Challenge of Process Metaphysics. [REVIEW] American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 33 (3):277-281.score: 18.0
    Process metaphysics has had a more limited impact in Roman Catholic theology than it has had in Protestant theology. In The One, the Many, and the Trinity, Marc Pugliese traces the development of Roman Catholic theology synthesized with process theology as it is found in the thought of Joseph A. Bracken, S. J. As the title indicates, Bracken’s process perspective concerning the Trinity is the main focus of the book. The One, the Many, and the Trinity consists of four (...)
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  32. William O. Reichert, Natural Right in the Political Philosophy of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon.score: 18.0
    When Professor Georges Gurvitch, the highly esteemed occupant of the chair of philosophy at the University of Strausbourg before World War ll and the author of a series of brilliant studies in the pluralist philosophy of law, referred to Pierre—Joseph Proudhon as the central figure in the development of modern social and judicial philosophy, the basis of his highly flattering judgment was the philosophy of law that serves as the basis of Proudhon’s mutualism, a socio-legal conceptualization that had not (...)
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  33. David Paulsen & Brett McDonald (2008). Joseph Smith and the Trinity: An Analysis and Defense of the Social Model of the Godhead. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):47-74.score: 18.0
    The theology of Joseph Smith remains controversial and at times divisive in the broader Christian community. This paper takes Smith’s trinitarian theologyas its point of departure and seeks to accomplish four interrelated goals: (1) to provide a general defense of “social trinitarianism” from some of the major objections raised against it; (2) to express what we take to be Smith’s understanding of the Trinity; (3) to analyze the state of modern ST and (4) to argue that, as a form (...)
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  34. Douglas Hedley (2011). “The Monstrous Centaur”? Joseph de Maistre on Reason, Passion and Violence. Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):71-81.score: 18.0
    This essay remarks upon a seeming paradox in the philosophical anthropology of Joseph de Maistre (1753–1821). He presents a traditional Platonic asymmetry of reason and the passions. This is put to the service of an Origenistic-universalistic theology that revolves around questions of guilt, punishment and redemption and a theory of sacrifice. Maistre is far from being the irrationalist that many political theorists observe, even if he presents an antagonistic relationship between reason and passions, the rational self and its desires. (...)
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  35. Solange Missagia Matos (2013). Imaginário religioso: o simbolismo do herói à luz de Joseph Campbell e Carl Gustav Jung. 2011. Horizonte 11 (29):409-411.score: 18.0
    DISSERTAÇÃO DE MESTRADO MATTOS, Solange Missagia. Imaginário religioso: o simbolismo do herói à luz de Joseph Campbell e Carl Gustav Jung. 2011. 115 folhas. Dissertação (Mestrado) – Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais, Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Religião, Belo Horizonte.
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  36. Eric J. Mohr (2014). Joseph Schear (Ed): Mind, Reason, and Being-in-the-World: The McDowell–Dreyfus Debate. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):239-242.score: 18.0
    Joseph Schear provides us with a much-needed compilation of this whole “battle of myths” that began when Hubert Dreyfus presented a challenge to John McDowell’s theory of perception with his 2005 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association. Although, back then, the terms of the debate were presented in the context of McDowell’s reading of Aristotle and phronēsis, they have since been taken up in their own right. Dreyfus claims that conceptual capacities cannot be pervasive in perceptual experience as (...)
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  37. Clark Glymour, Review of Joseph E. Earley, Sr. (Ed.), Chemical Explanation: Characteristics, Development, Autonomy. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Magnani, Lorenzo (2001), Abduction, Reason, and Science: Processes of Discovery and Explanation. New York: Kluwer Academic/ Plenum Publishers. Magnani. Lorenzo, and Nancy Nersessian (eds.) (2002), Model-Based Reasoning: Technology, Science, Values. New York: Kluwer Academic/ Plenum Publishers. Joseph E. Earley, Sr. (ed.), Chemical Explanation: Characteristics, Development, Autonomy, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 988. New York Academy of Sciences (2003), 370 pp., $130.00 (cloth).
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  38. Hanoch Sheinman (2006). Book Review: Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):244-249.score: 18.0
    Reason and Value collects fifteen brand-new papers by leading contemporary philosophers on themes from the moral philosophy of Joseph Raz. The subtlety and power of Raz's reflections on ethical topics--including especially his explorations of the connections between practical reason and the theory of value--make his writings a fertile source for anyone working in this area. The volume honors Raz's accomplishments in the area of ethical theorizing, and will contribute to an enhanced appreciation of the significance of his work for (...)
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  39. M. Jason Reddoch (2012). Philo of Alexandrias Use of Sleep and Dreaming as Epistemological Metaphors in Relation to Joseph. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):283-302.score: 18.0
    Dreams are used figuratively throughout Greek literature to refer to something fleeting and/or unreal. In Plato, this metaphorical language is specifically used to describe an epistemological distinction: the one who has false knowledge or opinion is said to be dreaming while the one who has true knowledge is said to be awake. These figures are also central to Philo of Alexandria's philosophical language in De somniis 1-2 and De Iosepho . Although scholars have documented these epistemological metaphors in Plato and (...)
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  40. Anthony Freeman (2006). Joseph A. Goguen: Editor JCS 1994-2006. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (6):5-6.score: 18.0
    It is a sad duty to report the death of Joseph Goguen (1941-2006) on July 3rd, shortly after a three-day Festschrift Symposium, organized by colleagues from across the world, to mark his 65th birthday and to celebrate his retirement from the University of California at San Diego.
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  41. Joseph Agassi, Joseph Agassi.score: 18.0
    Analogies have been traditionally recognized as a proper part of inductive procedures, akin to generalizations. Seldom, however, have they been presented as superior to generalizations, in the attainability of a higher degree of certitude for their conclusions or in other respects. Though Bacon de6nitely preferred analogy to generalization~, the tradition seems to me to go the other way — until the recent publication of works by Mary B. Hesse {[2], pp. 21-28 and passim) and, perhaps, R. Harre {[lj, pp. 23-28 (...)
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  42. Joseph F. Chorpenning (1997). The Enigma of St Joseph in Poussin's Holy Family on the Steps. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 60:276-281.score: 18.0
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  43. Gerald G. Osborn (1986). Joseph Lister and the Origins of Antisepsis. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 7 (2):91-105.score: 18.0
    In the mid-nineteenth century when Joseph Baron Lister was beginning his surgical career, bold new theories of medicine were being proposed with increasing frequency. Many of these new theories were in conflict as to how the body functioned and how disease and injury should be approached. They all conflicted more, however, with the older theory of vitalism which they were gradually replacing. Lister believed in vitalism and was quite bothered by the new theories, but did not react to them (...)
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  44. Patricia A. Ward (1980). Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition: Platonism and Romanticism. Droz.score: 18.0
    WARD Joseph Joubert and the Critical Tradition Platonism and Romanticism LIBRAIRIE DROZ SA 11, rue Massot GENEVE 1980 ...
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  45. Jack Fruchtman (1983). The Apocalyptic Politics of Richard Price and Joseph Priestley: A Study in Late Eighteenth Century English Republican Millennialism. American Philosophical Society.score: 18.0
    Preface Once when Joseph Priestley was contemplating the political developments of his time, he told his friend Theophilus Lindsey that they motivated him ...
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  46. Brett McDonald (2008). Joseph Smith and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):47-74.score: 18.0
    The theology of Joseph Smith remains controversial and at times divisive in the broader Christian community. This paper takes Smith’s trinitarian theologyas its point of departure and seeks to accomplish four interrelated goals: (1) to provide a general defense of “social trinitarianism” from some of the major objections raised against it; (2) to express what we take to be Smith’s understanding of the Trinity; (3) to analyze the state of modern ST and (4) to argue that, as a form (...)
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  47. Nicola Pedone (1995). Musicologia E Fenomenologia in F. Joseph Smith. Axiomathes 6 (2):211-226.score: 18.0
    In the last two decades an increasing number of musicians, musicologists and philosophers in the United States of America have dealt with questions of philosophy of music on a phenomenological basis. F. Joseph Smith certainly deserves mention as one of the first and most innovative of these authors. Sections 1 and 2 of the paper sketch a portrait of Smith against the background of the current situation in America, where there is a strong awareness of the need (...)
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  48. Nina Pelikan Straus (2013). JOE-ANSWERS A Conversation with Joseph Frank. Common Knowledge 19 (3):399-410.score: 18.0
    This interview with Joseph Frank — best known as the author of a five-volume biography of Dostoevsky (published 1976 – 2002) and of Spatial Form in Modern Literature (1945) — was conducted in 2012 at Stanford and is published here, shortly after his death at age ninety-four, as a memorial to him. The conversation highlights Frank's representation of Dostoevsky as a critic and a satirist of the nihilist intelligentsia of nineteenth-century Russia — a portrayal that runs counter to the (...)
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  49. Carolina Armenteros & Richard Lebrun (eds.) (2011). Joseph de Maistre and His European Readers: From Friedrich von Gentz to Isaiah Berlin. Brill.score: 18.0
    Long known solely as fascism s precursor, Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821) re-emerges in this volume as a versatile thinker with a colossally diverse posterity whose continuing relevance in Europe is ensured by his theorization of the ...
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  50. Anja Schwarz (2013). Im Maschinenraum der Zivilisation

    Rhythmen in Joseph Conrads Heart of Darkness.
    Zeitschrift für Kulturphilosophie 2013 (1):53-65.
    score: 18.0
    Rhythmus figuriert in Joseph Conrads Heart of Darkness als wirkmächtige Sinneserfahrung, die Körper affiziert und auf diese Weise Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen Menschen und Maschinen oder aber Europäern und »Barbaren« herstellt. Er wird somit zu einem zentralen Ort der Aushandlung von Ängsten vor der Ansteckung durch das Fremde, wie sie für die britische Literatur zur Zeit der Jahrhundertwende typisch waren.
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