1. Magdalena Wiktoria Wiktoria Sliwinska, Manali Khadilkar, Jonathon Campbell-Ratcliffe, Frances Quevenco & Joseph T. Devlin (2012). Early and Sustained Supramarginal Gyrus Contributions to Phonological Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Reading is a surprisingly difficult task that, at a minimum, requires recognizing a visual stimulus and linking it with its corresponding sound and meaning. Neurologically, this involves an anatomically distributed set of brain regions cooperating to solve the problem. It has been hypothesized that the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) contributes preferentially to phonological aspects of word processing and thus plays an important role in visual word recognition. Here, we used chronometric transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the functional specificity and timing (...)
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  2. Cathy J. Price & Joseph T. Devlin (2011). The Interactive Account of Ventral Occipitotemporal Contributions to Reading. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (6):246-253.
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  3. Joseph T. Devlin, Matt H. Davis, Stuart A. McLelland & Richard P. Russell (2000). Efficiency, Information Theory, and Neural Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):475-476.
    We contend that if efficiency and reliability are important factors in neural information processing then distributed, not localist, representations are “evolution's best bet.” We note that distributed codes are the most efficient method for representing information, and that this efficiency minimizes metabolic costs, providing adaptive advantage to an organism.
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