Search results for 'Joshua Armstrong' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joshua Armstrong & Jason Stanley (2011). Singular Thoughts and Singular Propositions. Philosophical Studies 154 (2):205 - 222.score: 240.0
    A singular thought about an object o is one that is directly about o in a characteristic way—grasp of that thought requires having some special epistemic relation to the object o, and the thought is ontologically dependent on o. One account of the nature of singular thought exploits a Russellian Structured Account of Propositions, according to which contents are represented by means of structured n-tuples of objects, properties, and functions. A proposition is singular, according to this framework, if and only (...)
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  2. Joshua Armstrong & Ernest Lepore (2011). On Expression Identity: A Critical Notice of Robert Fiengo and Robert May, De Lingua Belief. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):569-579.score: 240.0
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  3. D. M. Armstrong, John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) (1993). Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays in Honor of D.M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    D.M. Armstrong is an eminent Australian philosopher whose work over many years has dealt with such subjects as: the nature of possibility, concepts of the particular and the general, causes and laws of nature, and the nature of human consciousness. This collection of essays, all specially written for this volume, explore the many facets of Armstrong's work, concentrating on his more recent interests. There are four sections to the book: possibility and identity, universals, laws and causality, philosophy of (...)
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  4. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.score: 120.0
     
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  5. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Place and Armstrong's Views Compared. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge. 33--48.score: 120.0
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  6. P. Simons, S. Mumford & D. Armstrong (2005). Critical Discussion of David Armstrong, Truth and Truthmakers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):253.score: 120.0
     
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  7. David M. Armstrong (1959). Mr Arthadeva and Naive Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (May):67-70.score: 90.0
  8. David M. Armstrong (1963). Max Deutscher and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):246-249.score: 90.0
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  9. David M. Armstrong (1964). Vesey on Bodily Sensations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (August):247-248.score: 90.0
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  10. David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.score: 90.0
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  11. A. D. Sanger (1903). Book Review:National Education. H. E. Armstrong, H. W. Eve, Joshua Fitch, W. A. Hewins, John C. Medd, T. A. Organ, A. D. Provand, B. Reynolds, Francis Stoves, Laurie Magnus. [REVIEW] Ethics 13 (3):395-.score: 72.0
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  12. David M. Armstrong (1968). A Materialist Theory of the Mind. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This classic work of recent philosophy was first published in 1968, and remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In A Materialist Theory of the Mind , D. M. Armstrong provided insight into the debate surrounding the relationship of the mind and body. He put forth a detailed materialist account of all the main mental phenomena, including perception, sensation, belief, the will, introspection, mental images, and consciousness. This causal analysis (...)
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  13. D. M. Armstrong (1983). What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the (...)
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  14. D. M. Armstrong (2004). Truth and Truthmakers. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Truths are determined not by what we believe, but by the way the world is. Or so realists about truth believe. Philosophers call such theories correspondence theories of truth. Truthmaking theory, which now has many adherents among contemporary philosophers, is the most recent development of a realist theory of truth, and in this book D. M. Armstrong offers the first full-length study of this theory. He examines its applications to different sorts of truth, including contingent truths, modal truths, truths (...)
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  15. D. M. Armstrong (2010). Sketch for a Systematic Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    David Armstrong sets out his metaphysical system in a set of concise and lively chapters each dealing with one aspect of the world.
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  16. D. M. Armstrong (1997). A World of States of Affairs. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Armstrong's analysis, which acknowledges the "logical atomism" of Russell and Wittgenstein, makes facts (or states of affairs, as the author calls them) the ...
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  17. D. M. Armstrong (1989). A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This major new work by David Armstrong is a contribution to recent philosophical discussions about possible worlds. Taking Wittgenstein's Tractatus as his point of departure, Armstrong argues that non-actual possibilities and possible worlds are recombinations of actually existing elements and as such are useful fictions. Included is an extended criticism of the alternative possible worlds approach championed by the American philosopher David Lewis.
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  18. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Dispositions: A Debate. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Dispositions are essential to our understanding of the world. IDispositions: A Debate is an extended dialogue between three distinguished philosophers - D.M. Armstrong, C.B. Martin and U.T. Place - on the many problems associated with dispositions, which reveals their own distinctive accounts of the nature of dispositions. These are then linked to other issues such as the nature of mind, matter, universals, existence, laws of nature (...)
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  19. David Armstrong, Combinatorialism Revisited.score: 60.0
    The object of this paper is to argue once again for the combinatorial account of possibility defended in earlier work (Armstrong, 1989, 1997). But there I failed fully to realise the dialectical advantages that accrue once one begins by assuming the hypothesis of logical atomism, the hypothesis that postulates simple particulars and simple universals (properties and relations) at the bottom of the world. Logical atomism is, I incline to think, no better than ‘speculative cosmology’ as opposed to ‘analytic ontology’, (...)
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  20. D. M. Armstrong (1989). Universals: An Opinionated Introduction. Westview Press.score: 60.0
    In this short text, a distinguished philosopher turns his attention to one of the oldest and most fundamental philosophical problems of all: How it is that we are able to sort and classify different things as being of the same natural class? Professor Armstrong carefully sets out six major theories—ancient, modern, and contemporary—and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of each. Recognizing that there are no final victories or defeats in metaphysics, Armstrong nonetheless defends a traditional account of universals (...)
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  21. David M. Armstrong (2002). Vérifacteurs pour des vérités modales. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale (2):491-507.score: 60.0
    Revenant sur la question des vérifacteurs, D. Armstrong demande ici d'abord comment concilier le maximalisme (toute vérité a un vérifacteur) et la relation de nécessitation (toute vérité contingente peut servir de vérifacteur pour une vérité nécessaire quelconque). L'A. examine quel sens métaphysique donner à la notion d'implication, et s'il y a un sens à admettre une contingence de re. Il traite à ce niveau des possibilités pures, examine le cas des aliens chez <span class='Hi'>David</span> Lewis, puis pose la question (...)
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  22. Isobel Armstrong (2000). The Radical Aesthetic. Blackwell Publishers.score: 60.0
    In stark opposition to this anti-aesthetic project, Isobel Armstrong evolves a new poetics, forging an alternative aesthetic discourse by remaking its ...
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  23. John Anderson, David Armstrong & Creagh Cole, Front Matter.score: 60.0
    'With this scheme, John Anderson joins a very distinguished line of philosophers who have presented us with a set of categories. We have first Plato (the doctrine of Highest Kinds in his dialogue The Sophist), then Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, and Samuel Alexander.' - D. M. Armstrong, from the introduction. Space, Time and the Categories presents a unique record of personal influence and inspiration over three generations of philosophers in Australia, England and Scotland. This work is a vitally important text (...)
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  24. Karen Armstrong (1993/2004). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.score: 60.0
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the three dominant monotheistic religions of the world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From (...)
     
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  25. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Campbell. In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D M Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  26. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Jackson's "Block's Challenge". In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D.M. Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  27. David M. Armstrong (1984). Self-Profile. In R. J. Bogdan (ed.), D. M. Armstrong. Reidel. 3-51.score: 60.0
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  28. Karen Armstrong (2006). The Great Transformation: The Beginning of Our Religious Traditions. Knopf.score: 60.0
    In the ninth century BCE, the peoples of four distinct regions of the civilized world created the religious and philosophical traditions that have continued to nourish humanity to the present day: Confucianism and Daoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, monotheism in Israel, and philosophical rationalism in Greece. Later generations further developed these initial insights, but we have never grown beyond them. Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, for example, were all secondary flowerings of the original Israelite vision. Now, in (...)
     
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  29. John Armstrong (2004). The Secret Power of Beauty. Allen Lane.score: 60.0
    A graceful and lucid study of the power of beauty and the deep significance it has in our lives In defining beauty and our response to it, we are often caught between the concrete and the sublime. We wish to categorize beauty, to clearly label its parts, and yet we wish also to celebrate its mysterious-and at times mythical-power. Armstrong's response is a discursive and graceful journey through various and complementary interpretations, leading us from Hogarth's belief that the essence (...)
     
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  30. David M. Armstrong (2005). Four Disputes About Properties. Synthese 144 (3):1-12.score: 30.0
    In considering the nature of properties four controversial decisions must be made. (1) Are properties universals or tropes? (2) Are properties attributes of particulars, or are particulars just bundles of properties? (3) Are properties categorical (qualitative) in nature, or are they powers? (4) If a property attaches to a particular, is this predication contingent, or is it necessary? These choices seem to be in a great degree independent of each other. The author indicates his own choices.
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  31. David M. Armstrong (1963). Is Introspective Knowledge Incorrigible? Philosophical Review 62 (4):417-32.score: 30.0
  32. David M. Armstrong (1999). The Mind-Body Problem: An Opinionated Introduction. Westview Press.score: 30.0
    The emphasis is always on the arguments used, and the way one position develops from another. By the end of the book the reader is afforded both a grasp of the state of the controversy, and how we got there.
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  33. David M. Armstrong (1979). Three Types of Consciousness. In Brain and Mind. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 69). 235.score: 30.0
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  34. Chris Armstrong (2009). Global Egalitarianism. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.score: 30.0
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
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  35. David M. Armstrong (1991). Searle's Neo-Cartesian Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Issues 1:67-71.score: 30.0
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  36. D. M. Armstrong (1993). A World of States of Affairs. Philosophical Perspectives 7:429-440.score: 30.0
  37. D. M. Armstrong (1978). Naturalism, Materialism and First Philosophy. Philosophia 8 (2-3):261-276.score: 30.0
    First, The doctrine of naturalism, That reality is spatio-Temporal, Is defended. Second, The doctrine of materialism or physicalism, That this spatio-Temporal reality involves nothing but the entities of physics working according to the principles of physics, Is defended. Third, It is argued that these doctrines do not constitute a "first philosophy." a satisfactory first philosophy should recognize universals, In the form of instantiated properties and relations. Laws of nature are constituted by relations between universals. What universals there are, And what (...)
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  38. D. M. Armstrong (1974). Infinite Regress Arguments and the Problem of Universals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):191 – 201.score: 30.0
    What is it for a particular to have a property? many proposed analyses of this situation may be called relational accounts. The particular has some relation, R, To some entity p. R may be the relation of falling under, Being a member of, Resembling or "participating." p may be a predicate, A concept, A class, A paradigm instance or a form. A number of arguments seek to prove that all these accounts are involved in various vicious infinite regresses. These arguments (...)
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  39. David M. Armstrong (1973). Epistemological Foundations for a Materialist Theory of Mind. Philosophy of Science 40 (June):178-93.score: 30.0
    A philosophy might take its general inspiration from (1) commonsense; (2) careful observation; (3) philosophical argumentation; (4) the sciences; (5) "higher" sources of illumination. It is argued in this paper that it is bedrock commonsense, and the sciences, which are the most reliable foundations for a philosophy. This result is applied to the discussion and defense of a materialist theory of the mind.
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  40. Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong (1984). An Argument Against David Lewis' Theory of Possible Worlds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):164 – 168.score: 30.0
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  41. D. M. Armstrong (2003). Review of Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra's Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):285 – 286.score: 30.0
    Book Information Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals. By Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra. Clarendon Press. Oxford. 2002. Pp. xii + 238. £35.
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  42. D. M. Armstrong (1988). Are Dispositions Ultimate? Reply to Franklin. Philosophical Quarterly 38 (150):84-86.score: 30.0
  43. Robert W. Armstrong (1996). The Relationship Between Culture and Perception of Ethical Problems in International Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1199 - 1208.score: 30.0
    This research study sought to identify whether there is a relationship between ethical perceptions and culture. An examination of the cultural variables suggests that there is a relationship between two of Hofstede's cultural dimensions (i.e., Uncertainty Avoidance and Individualism) and ethical perceptions. This finding supports the hypothetical linkage between the cultural environment and the perceived ethical problem variables posited in Hunt and Vitell's General Theory of Marketing Ethics (1986).
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  44. John M. Armstrong (1997). Epicurean Justice. Phronesis 42 (3):324-334.score: 30.0
    Epicurus is one of the first social contract theorists, holding that justice is an agreement neither to harm nor be harmed. He also says that living justly is necessary and sufficient for living pleasantly, which is the Epicurean goal. Some say that there are two accounts of justice in Epicurus -- one as a personal virtue, the other as a virtue of institutions. I argue that the personal virtue derives from compliance with just social institutions, and so we need to (...)
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  45. D. M. Armstrong (1986). In Defence of Structural Universals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (1):85 – 88.score: 30.0
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  46. Review author[S.]: D. M. Armstrong (1993). The Identification Problem and the Inference Problem. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):421-422.score: 30.0
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  47. Aurelia Armstrong, Foucault and Feminism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
  48. Adrian Heathcote & D. M. Armstrong (1991). Causes and Laws. Noûs 25 (1):63-73.score: 30.0
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  49. D. M. Armstrong (1982). Laws of Nature as Relations Between Universals and as Universals. Philosophical Topics 13 (1):7-24.score: 30.0
  50. David M. Armstrong (1968). The Headless Woman and the Defense of Materialism. Analysis 29:48-49.score: 30.0
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