Search results for 'Joshua D. Guttman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    William M. Farmer & Joshua D. Guttman (2000). A Set Theory with Support for Partial Functions. Studia Logica 66 (1):59-78.
    Partial functions can be easily represented in set theory as certain sets of ordered pairs. However, classical set theory provides no special machinery for reasoning about partial functions. For instance, there is no direct way of handling the application of a function to an argument outside its domain as in partial logic. There is also no utilization of lambda-notation and sorts or types as in type theory. This paper introduces a version of von-Neumann-Bernays-Gödel set theory for reasoning about sets, proper (...)
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  2.  4
    René Lavendhomme, Thierry Lucas & Sequent Calculi (2000). François Lepage, Elias Thijsse, Heinrich Wansing/In-Troduction 1 J. Michael Dunn/Partiality and its Dual 5 Jan van Eijck/Making Things Happen 41 William M. Farmer, Joshua D. Guttman/A Set Theory. [REVIEW] Studia Logica 66:447-448.
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  3.  15
    O. D. (1978). The Middle Platonists 80 B.C. To A.D. 220. Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):475-476.
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  4.  12
    A. B. D. (1964). Approche Contemporaine d'Une Affirmation de Dieu. Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):633-633.
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  5.  13
    C. D. (1964). Descartes, Complément À l'Histoire d'Une Préface Méconnue. Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):626-627.
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  6.  9
    A. D. Sanger (1903). Book Review:National Education. H. E. Armstrong, H. W. Eve, Joshua Fitch, W. A. Hewins, John C. Medd, T. A. Organ, A. D. Provand, B. Reynolds, Francis Stoves, Laurie Magnus. [REVIEW] Ethics 13 (3):395-.
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  7. A. D. Sanger (1902). National Education, by H. E. Armstrong, H. W. Eve Joshua Fitch W. A. Hewins John C. Medd T. A. Organe A. D. Provand, B. Reynolds, Francis Stoves and Laurie Magnus. [REVIEW] Ethics 13:395.
     
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  8. A. D. Sanger (1903). National EducationH. E. Armstrong H. W. Eve Joshua Fitch W. A. Hewins John C. Medd T. A. Organ A. D. Provand B. Reynolds Francis Stoves Laurie Magnus. [REVIEW] International Journal of Ethics 13 (3):395-398.
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  9. Regna Darnell (2015). Joshua A. Bell; Alison K. Brown; Robert J. Gordon .Recreating First Contact: Expeditions, Anthropology, and Popular Culture. Xii + 261 Pp., Illus., Bibls., Index. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2013. $49.95. [REVIEW] Isis 106 (2):495-496.
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  10. Peter Singer (2005). Ethics and Intuitions. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):331 - 352.
    For millennia, philosophers have speculated about the origins of ethics. Recent research in evolutionary psychology and the neurosciences has shed light on that question. But this research also has normative significance. A standard way of arguing against a normative ethical theory is to show that in some circumstances the theory leads to judgments that are contrary to our common moral intuitions. If, however, these moral intuitions are the biological residue of our evolutionary history, it is not clear why we should (...)
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  11.  56
    Joshua Wilburn (2014). Is Appetite Ever 'Persuaded'?: An Alternative Reading of Republic 554c-D. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3).
    Republic 554c-d—where the oligarchic individual is said to restrain his appetites ‘by compulsion and fear’, rather than by persuasion or by taming them with speech—is often cited as evidence that the appetitive part of the soul can be ‘persuaded’. I argue that the passage does not actually support that conclusion. I offer an alternative reading and suggest that appetite, on Plato’s view, is not open to persuasion.
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  12.  5
    Jerome F. D. Creach (2012). Joshua 13–21 and the Politics of Land Division. Interpretation 66 (2):153-163.
    Joshua 13–21 makes the remarkable claim that the Lord conquered, possessed, and gave the land as a gift to Israel. Although these chapters likely originated in political concerns of Israelite kings, the theological cast of the material outstrips any political motivations that gave rise to the material. The enduring role of this section of Joshua is to shape a society devoted to and dependent on God.
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  13. Richard D. Nelson (forthcoming). Book Review: From Joshua to Calaphas: High Priests After the Exile. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (1):98-100.
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  14. Richard D. Nelson (forthcoming). Book Review: Joshua. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (4):418-420.
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  15.  36
    D. Miller (2010). Philosophy, Politics, Democracy * by Joshua Cohen. Analysis 71 (1):202-204.
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  16.  4
    D. M. Jones (1958). A New Approach to Greek and Latin Literature Joshua Whatmough: Poetic, Scientific and Other Forms of Discourse. A New Approach to Greek and Latin Literature. (Sather Classical Lectures, Vol. Xxix.) Pp. Xii+285. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press (London: Cambridge University Press), 1956. Cloth, 37s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (02):136-139.
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  17.  16
    D. Ellis Evans (1972). Ancient Gallic Dialects Joshua Whatmough: The Dialects of Ancient Gaul: Prolegomena and Records of the Dialects. Pp. Xix+85+1376; 4 Maps. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1970. Cloth, $30.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (02):243-245.
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  18.  5
    D. M. Jones (1958). Language Joshua Whatmough: Language: A Modern Synthesis. Pp. X + 270. London: Secker and Warburg, 1956. Cloth, 25s. Net. The Classical Review 8 (01):56-57.
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  19.  1
    Joshua C. Gregory (1928). History of Science Teaching in England. By D. M. Turner M.A., B.Sc. (Lond.), Head of Science Department, Wycombe Abbey School; Research Assistant, University College, London. (London: Chapman & Hall, Ltd. 1927. Pp. X + 208. Price 7s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 3 (10):256-.
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  20. Joshua Barlaz (1955). Review: D. Shulz, Mathematics, its Nature and Methods; D. Shoulz, The New Mathematics; D. Schultz, Ways of Thinking in Natural Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):288-288.
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  21. Joshua Barlaz (1955). Shulz D.. . Hatteva' Wehaaretz, Vol. 7 , Pp. 184–185.Shoulz D.. . Hatteva' Wehaaretz, Vol. 7 , Pp. 286–290.Schultz D.. . Hatteva' Wehaaretz, Vol. 8 , Pp. 407–408. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):288.
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  22. Joshua Finkel (1928). Ozar MassaothJ. D. Eisenstein. Isis 11 (1):147-149.
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  23. P. D. Foster (1934). Joshua or Judges? New Blackfriars 15 (168):203-211.
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  24. Joshua O. Leibowitz (1965). Plotting the Anatomical WatershedAndreas Vesalius of Brussels, 1514-1564C. D. O'Malley. Isis 56 (3):362-365.
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  25.  37
    Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen (2009). Pushing Moral Buttons: The Interaction Between Personal Force and Intention in Moral Judgment. Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
  26.  15
    Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen (2008). Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment. Cognition 107 (3):1144-1154.
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  27. Martin D. Yaffe & Richard S. Ruderman (eds.) (2013). Reorientation: Leo Strauss in the 1930s. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction; Martin D. Yaffe and Richard S. Ruderman -- 1. How Strauss Became Strauss; Heinrich Meier -- 2. Spinoza's Critique of Religion: Reading Too Literally and Not Reading Literally Enough; Steven Frank -- 3. The Light Shed on the Crucial Development of Strauss's Thought by his Correspondence with Gerhard Krüger; Thomas L. Pangle -- 4. Strauss on Hermann Cohen's 'Idealizing' Appropriation of Maimonides as a Platonist; Martin D. Yaffe -- 5. Strauss on the Religious and (...)
     
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  28. Joshua D. Greene (2014). Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for Ethics. Ethics 124 (4):695-726.
    In this article I explain why cognitive science (including some neuroscience) matters for normative ethics. First, I describe the dual-process theory of moral judgment and briefly summarize the evidence supporting it. Next I describe related experimental research examining influences on intuitive moral judgment. I then describe two ways in which research along these lines can have implications for ethics. I argue that a deeper understanding of moral psychology favors certain forms of consequentialism over other classes of normative moral theory. I (...)
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  29.  16
    Joshua D. K. Brown (forthcoming). Natural Objects. Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-18.
    This paper introduces a framework for thinking about ontological questions—in particular, the Special Composition Question—and shows how the framework might help support something like an account of restricted composition. The framework takes the form of an account of natural objects, in analogy with David Lewis’s account of natural properties. Objects, like properties, come in various metaphysical grades, from the fundamental, fully objective, perfectly natural objects to the nomologically otiose, maximally gerrymandered, perfectly non-natural objects. The perfectly natural objects, I argue, are (...)
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  30.  36
    Joshua D. Greene (2007). Why Are VMPFC Patients More Utilitarian? A Dual-Process Theory of Moral Judgment Explains. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):322-323.
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  31.  3
    Jonathan D. Cohen Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom (2008). Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment. Cognition 107 (3):1144.
  32. Joseph M. Paxton & Joshua D. Greene (2010). Moral Reasoning: Hints and Allegations. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):511-527.
    Recent research in moral psychology highlights the role of emotion and intuition in moral judgment. In the wake of these findings, the role and significance of moral reasoning remain uncertain. In this article, we distinguish among different kinds of moral reasoning and review evidence suggesting that at least some kinds of moral reasoning play significant roles in moral judgment, including roles in abandoning moral intuitions in the absence of justifying reasons, applying both deontological and utilitarian moral principles, and counteracting automatic (...)
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  33. Joshua D. Greene (2012). Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment. Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
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  34. Fiery Cushman, Liane Young & Joshua D. Greene (2010). Multi-System Moral Psychology. In John Michael Doris (ed.), The Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press
  35.  17
    Joshua D. K. Brown & James W. Garson (forthcoming). A New Semantics for Vagueness. Erkenntnis:1-21.
    Intuitively, vagueness involves some sort of indeterminacy: if Plato is a borderline case of baldness, then there is no fact of the matter about whether or not he’s bald—he’s neither bald nor not bald. The leading formal treatments of such indeterminacy—three valued logic, supervaluationism, etc.—either fail to validate the classical theorems, or require that various classically valid inference rules be restricted. Here we show how a fully classical, yet indeterminist account of vagueness can be given within natural semantics, an alternative (...)
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  36. Joshua D. Greene (2011). Emotion and Morality: A Tasting Menu. Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
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  37. Joshua D. Reichard (2013). Of Miracles and Metaphysics: A Pentecostal‐Charismatic and Process‐Relational Dialogue. Zygon 48 (2):274-293.
    This article is comprised of a dialogue between Pentecostal-Charismatic and Process-Relational theologies on the perennial issue of miracles. The language of supernaturalism, widely employed by Pentecostal-Charismatic theologians, is contrasted with the metaphysical naturalism of Process-Relational theology; it is proposed that a philosophically and scientifically sensitive theology of miracles is possible through a synthesis of both traditions. Themes such as nonmaterialism over materialism, spiritual experience, and prayer for healing miracles are explored. A theology of miracles, mutually informed by both Pentecostal-Charismatic and (...)
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  38.  23
    Joshua D. Margolis (1999). Toward an Ethics of Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):619-638.
    The organization is importantly different from both the nation-state and the individual and hence needs its own ethical models and theories, distinct from political and moral theory. To develop a case for organizational ethics, this paper advances arguments in three directions. First, it highlights the growing role of organizations and their distinctive attributes. Second, it illuminates the incongruities between organizations and moral and political philosophy. Third, it takes these incongruities, as well as organizations’ distinctive attributes, as a starting point for (...)
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  39.  13
    Joshua D. K. Brown (2015). Chemical Atomism: A Case Study in Confirmation and Ontology. Synthese 192 (2):453-485.
    Quine, taking the molecular constitution of matter as a paradigmatic example, offers an account of the relation between theory confirmation and ontology. Elsewhere, he deploys a similar ontological methodology to argue for the existence of mathematical objects. Penelope Maddy considers the atomic/molecular theory in more historical detail. She argues that the actual ontological practices of science display a positivistic demand for “direct observation,” and that fulfillment of this demand allows us to distinguish molecules and other physical objects from mathematical abstracta. (...)
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  40.  5
    Joshua D. Margolis (1998). Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people inbusiness organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in turn, (...)
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  41.  40
    Joshua D. Goldstein (2011). New Natural Law Theory and the Grounds of Marriage. Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):461-482.
    New natural lawyers--notably Grisez, Finnis, and George--have written much on civil marriage's moral boundaries and grounds, but with slight influence. The peripheral place of the new natural law theory (NNLT) results from the marital grounds they suggest and the exclusionary moral conclusions they draw from them. However, I argue a more authentic and attractive NNLT account of marriage is recoverable through overlooked resources within the theory itself: friendship and moral self-constitution. This reconstructed account allows us to identify the relation between (...)
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  42. Amitai Shenhav, David G. Rand & Joshua D. Greene (2012). Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):423.
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  43.  14
    Joshua D. Greene (2015). The Rise of Moral Cognition. Cognition 135:39-42.
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  44.  3
    Joshua D. Margolis (1998). Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people inbusiness organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in turn, (...)
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  45. Joshua D. Crabill (2013). Suppose Yalcin is Wrong About Epistemic Modals. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):625-635.
    In “Epistemic Modals,” Seth Yalcin argues that what explains the deficiency of sentences containing epistemic modals of the form ‘p and it might be that not-p’ is that sentences of this sort are strictly contradictory, and thus are not instances of a Moore-paradox as has been previous suggested. Benjamin Schnieder, however, argues in his Yalcin’s explanation of these sentences’ deficiency turns out to be insufficiently general, as it cannot account for less complex but still defective sentences, such as ‘Suppose it (...)
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  46.  9
    Joshua D. Greene (2015). Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Journal Name: The Law & Ethics of Human Rights Issue: Ahead of print.
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  47. Joshua D. Greene, Finding Faults: How Moral Dilemmas Illuminate Cognitive Structure.
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
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  48.  19
    Samuel M. McClure, Matthew M. Botvinick, Nick Yeung, Joshua D. Greene & Jonathan D. Cohen (2007). Conflict Monitoring in Cognition-Emotion Competition. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press
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  49.  30
    Sabine Roeser & Joel Rickard (2014). Moral Knowledge and Intuitions. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):173-176.
    After decades of being met with suspicion or even disdain the epistemic role of intuitions – and specifically the school of ethical intuitionism – has seen a revival. This revival has been undertaken by both leading moral philosophers such as Jonathan Dancy and Robert Audi and moral psychologists like Jonathan Haidt and Joshua Greene.See Jonathan Dancy, Ethics Without Principles (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), Robert Audi, The Good in the Right. A Theory of Intuition and Intrinsic Value (Princeton: Princeton (...)
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  50.  16
    Samuel R. Aybar, Joshua D. Harlan & Won J. Lee (1991). John Rawls. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 1 (1):38-47.
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